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£^€ NEW YORK 




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THE OLDEST THEATRICAL PUBLICATION IN AMERICA 



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THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



May 2, 1917 



"THE SPIRIT OF THE HOUR 



SI 



WHAT KIND OF AN 

AMERICAN 



ARE YOU? 



Off the press just a few days'and_has; proved more powerful than all other patriotic songs in the field — stopping all shows 

worm by What Kind Of An American Are You? 

LEW BROWN and Music by • 

CHAS MCCARRON ALTON TILZER 

Marcia Moderato ____ =? k , K pm 'S v & w 




This land of the f ree __ 
This coun - try's been dared . 



Is for 
bat they 11 



i 4 m 4 ],j v r. i to t j , v m \ nr^ ^ 

T nn .r.<ffA> »« _ Or Tnr an -y one at all, who Is seek-lngLlb-er- ty W» 



you and for me 



Or for an-y one at all, who Is seek-ln&Llb-er - ty. 



find m pre-pared, And to try and gain our aim, not a pen-ny will be spared— We 




wel-come ev - 'ry stran-ger, and we help him all we can: And now that we're In 

are a friendly na-tlonaad we al-ways look for peace__We*re wait - ed and we've 




dan-ger, we de-peod on ev-'ry man The Stars and Stripes are call -log yon tt, 
walt-ed hop-ins that this war would cease. The en - e - my a - cross the sea won't 
rail 




lenda help -lug hand, If you re true blue. It's np toyou to show Just where yon stud. 

takeoargqodaa-Ttae So now Its up to ev-'ry man to make some sac- rl- flee — 

CHORUS 
a tewspo _. _p 




do If they tram-pie on Old Glor-y, will yon think that they are right?— or will yon stand be- 




blndyour land, and fight with alLyour might?_-What klndnf an A- mer-i-can are yon Thalia 




ques-t ion you'll have to ans-wer to. 



If the Star Spang-led Ban-ner don't make yon stand and 

n - : : me 




cheer.Then what are yon do-ing o-ver here?. 



CopyrlRht MCMXVU by Broadway Music Corporation 1*5 W,*6 , *> St. NY. 
All Rights Reserved Irternationml Copyright Seeared 

The Publisher rtfml il the right to the use of this Copyrighted work upon the parts of Inslrvia&JX.£trviig 
to reproduce Michauicallil 

The. Greatest Popular Patriotic Song of This Generation 



WILL VON TILZER, President 



BROADWAY MUSIC CORP- i«w.«thST.. new york city 

**"^^^«^*^ ww*-m ■ "iVLriW ww-^« . H5 N. CLARK ST., CHICAGO, ILL. 



Copyright, 1917, by the Clipper Corporation. 



Founded by 
FRANK QUEEN, 1853. 



NEW YORK, MAY 2, 1917 



VOLUME LXV— No. 13 
Price. Ten Cents 



MUSIC FIRMS 
FORM NEW 

ASS'N 

TO CUT OUT PAYING SINGERS 



At a meeting of music publishers, held 
Friday afternoon in the offices of the Na- 
tional Association of Vaudeville Managers 
the Music Publishers' Protective Associa- 
tion was formed and temporary officers 
elected. 

The object of the new organization is, 
according to its members, to better busi- 
ness conditions of the mnsic publishing 
industry and its efforts will begin with 
the elimination of payments to vaudeville 
singers for the introduction of songs in 
theatres. 

A majority of the local publishers were 
present and another meeting was held yes- 
terday at which plans to secure as members 
all the leading publishers of the country, 
were discussed. 

The new organization has set Sunday, 
May 8. as the last day upon which pay- 
ments in any form, either direct or indirect, 
will be made to singers and any infraction 
of the rules will be met with severe fines 
as a penalty. Each member of the or- 
ganization is to furnish a satisfactory bond 
guaranteeing his actions during the term 
of the contract which he executes with 
the society. The term of the contract 
which the members have signed is for two 
years, after which the organization is to 
go on along the same lines, providing it 
has worked out successfully. 

An executive board of three members, 
not connected with the music publishing 
business will be appointed to hear all com- 
plaints in regard to any infraction of the 
rules of the organization as to the pay- 
ing of singers. This committee will, if any 
member be found guilty, have the power 
to inflict a fine ranging from $1,000 to 
$2,500. 

TEe* society has the support of the 
Vaudeville Managers Protective Associa- 
tion, which, through its representative, Pat 
Casey, stated to the mnsic publishers, that, 
shonld any performer attempt to sing a 
sons from the catalogue of any firm or 
publisher not a member of the new or- 
ganization, for which he was receiving pay 
in any form, in any of the theatres con- 
trolled by the managers association, that 
song would be immediately eliminated from 
his repertoire and he would be forbidden 
to sing it in any of ttie houses. 

According to the estimates furnished by 
those who have made a study of the situa- 
tion, music publishers are paying singers 
over $200,000 a year for the introduction 
of songs upon the professional stage, an 
amount which, in view of the increased 
coat of production, has practically- wiped 
out all profit for the publisher, especially 
in view of the fact that while all com- 
modities have advanced in price during the 
past year, sheet music is sold at the same 
low price which has prevailed for years. 

With the exception of the salaries paid 
to a few of the officials of the Publishers* 
Society, the members believe that the enor- 
mous amount paid to singers will be saved 
and the sales of music not affected in any 

(Cfmtinied on page 4.) 



ACTRESS ROBBED OF WATCH 

Jersey CrtT, N. J., April 28. — The 
police are investigating the loss of a 
watch by Miss Georgia Philput, an actress, 
who had been appearing in the entertain- 
ment provided by the West Side Business 
Men's Association to boom their section 
through a carnival. According to her story, 
she was being escorted back to New York 
by two young men to whom she had been 
introduced, when, at the Grove Street 
station of the Hudson and Manhattan 
tubes she gave her handbag into the care 
of the men for a few moments. When she 
returned the men were gone, but the bag 
was there, she says. Upon lifting it she 
found that the bottom had been ripped 
out and the watch taken. She gave the 
Hotel Calvert, New York, as ber address. 



"GIRL WITH MILLION" STRANDED 

Tbenteaulau, Wis.. April 28. — After a 
run of two weeks, starting at Prairie du 
Chien, where they had only a $65 audience, 
"The Girl With a Million" stranded here. 
Thad and Irma de Monica wired to Harry 
Ashton for return fare to Chicago. Will- 
iam Conley, a billposter, produced the 
show under the firm name of Conley & 
Williams, later inducing a grocer's clerk 
to act as angel. A benefit was given here 
for the fourteen stranded performers, but 
the money realized went to hotel keepers 
for board bills, and the performers received 
nothing. 



TABLOID DIRECTOR KILLS SELF 

Terre Haute, Ind.. April 28.— Edward 
Mnkin. musical director of "The Sunny 
Side of Broadway." Max Bloom's tabloid 
playing the Hippodrome last week, slashed 
his wrists and throat last Sunday morning 
at the Croxton Hotel and died in a hospital 
an hour later. Persons working in the 
same act said that he had appeared worried 
for a week or more, and Saturday night 
worked only through the first show, say- 
ing thnt he was ill. The body was taken 
to the home of his mother. Mrs. Edward 
Makin. at Hamilton, Can. 



ACTOR HELD AS ALLEGED FORGER 

New Orleans, April 28. — H. M. Heath, 
a former actor, was arrested here last 
week by Pinkerton and Federal agents, on 
charges of alleged forgery, which, it is 
said, netted him over $12,000 in six weeks. 
It is claimed by the authorities that he 
disguised himself as an army officer and 
forged the signature of H. H. Brennon, 
chief ordnance officer, at Washington. It 
is also said that while in Chicago he cashed 
a check for $75, upon making a $5 purchase 
at A. G. Spalding & Co.'s store. 



FAMOUS CRITIC RETIRES 

CrNCTNWATl. Ohio, April 30. — Montgom- 
ery Phister. dramatic editor of the Com- 
mercial Tribune for thirty-five years and 
one of the deans of the profession in the 
United States to-day, announced his retire- 
ment. Ill health was the cause. 

Mr. Phister will leave soon for the West, 
where he hopes to recuperate his health. 
His successor on the Commercial has not 
been announced. 



NELL MORGAN MARRIED 

Nell Morjran. who was one of the 
original ball-room dancers at Reisen- 
weber's, under the management of Pat V. 
Kyne, was married Sunday afternoon in 
Murray's to Harold Hutchings, son of W. 
R. Hutchings, the millionaire ship builder 
of Brooklyn. 



OUSTED, RATS 

FORM NEW 

CLUB 

CALL SELVES "THE WANDERERS" 



After being ousted from the White Rats 
Club House last week, about 125 loyal 
White Rats held a meeting last Friday and 
organized a new club called "The Wan- 
derers," establishing quarters at 218 West 
Fiftieth Street Each of the members con- 
tributed $1 and from this amount the rent 
of the club rooms was paid and the neces- 
sary furniture to equip the quarters pur- 
chased. 

The new organization is composed of the 
"Old Guard" of White Rats who had im- 
plicit faith in Mountford and his policies 
and stuck to him to the end. When they 
were informed last week that all was over 
and that they would have to vacate the 
club house, all of them expressed their in- 
dignation without reserve, making remarks 
and statements not highly complimentary 
to their late international executive. One 
of them who was considered on the "in- 
side" and supposed to have the confidence 
of Mountford then spoke up and said ; 

"Well, we can get along without him. 
Come on, boys, get together and keep the 
White Rats agoing." 

This statement seemed to impress those 
of the "Old Guard" present, and a con- 
ference was held at which means were de- 
vised for the continuation of the organiza- 
tion. 

One of the men present suggested that, 
as long as they were turned out to "wan- 
der," it would be a good idea to name their 
club "The Wanderers." 
' All those present agreed that it would 
be advisable to confine their activities to 
the social field. 

It is said that the "White Rats" title is 
dead forever, as the members of the new 
organization feel that it will never again 
bear the prestige with performers that it 
has in the past. 

It is said that the new organization will- 
endeavor to get away, as much as possible, 
from any identification with the White 
Rats and that the officers of the club will 
be selected from among those who have 
never held office in the older organization. 

A Dr. Freeman is president of the organ- 
ization, and among the most active mem- 
bers are James Marco, Harry Miller and 
George Kingsbury, all of whom were said 
to have been in the confidence of Mount- 
ford. Since the abandonment of the strike, 
however, they are said to have broken off 
friendly relations with him. 

Miller, who was active in securing the 
aid of the Hebrew Trades Council during 
the White Rats strike, is to be the organ- 
izer for the Wanderers. 



ROCK HAD OBJECTIONS 

In view of the fact that Frances White 
and Frankie Faye, recently married, are 
on the same bill at the Royal next week, 
it was the desire of Manager Egan to send 
out wedding announcements to his patrons, 
but, it is said that the scheme was nipped 
in the bud by William Rock, who would 
have none of it. As a result the idea was 
abandoned, at least for the present. 



SIXTEEN MANAGERS ARRESTED 

Memphis, Term., April 28. — Sixteen 
managers of theatres and moving picture 
houses here were fined in the City Court 
and bound over to the grand jury "for vio- 
lation of a municipal statute prohibiting 
the operation of theatres and movies on 
Sunday. They were arrested last Sunday 
and the Theatrical Managers* Association, 
recently formed here, retained council to 
carry the test case to the Supreme Court, 
if necessary. 

The managers are Arthur Lane, of the 
Orpheum Theatre; F. G. Weiss, of the 
Lyceum; Mrs. Greene, of the Queen; J. 
F. Duthie, of the Princess; A. R. Richards, 
of the Beauty; J. W. Ruth, of the Em- 
pire No. I; J. B. Annis, of the Majestic 
No. 2; G. N. Currier, of the Majestic No. 
1 ; E. P. Moore, of the Empire No. 2; 
C. M. McElvay, of the old MajeBtic No. 
1 ; C. F. Bridges, owner of all the Majestic 
Theatres; A. Barrasso. Sam Zarilli, J. 
Maceri, M. Frank and M. J. Vosse. 



"DE LUXE ANNIE" OPENS 

Atlantic ClTT, April 30. — "De Luxe 
Annie," a new production of Arthur Ham- 
merstein's. made its initial bow for ap- 
proval at the Apollo Theatre here to-night, 
after having been brought down from 
New York on Saturday by Lyle D. 
Andrews. 

The piece proved to be a comedy, with 
a good cast, which included Jane Grey, 
Vincent Serrano, Thnrlow Bergen, Harrold 
Hartsell, Mary Hall. Minnie Milne, .Tack 
McBride, Dore Davidson. Percy Pollock, 
John C. Leach and Edward Mackay. 

"TIGER ROSE" HAS PREMIERE 

Wilmington, Del., April 30. — David Be- 
Insco's latest production. "Tiger Rose," 
was given its premiere at the Playhouse 
here to-night. It is from the pen of Will- 
ard Mack and is the play over which A. 
H. Woods brought a legal action against 
Belasco and Mack. Those in the cast are 
Lenore Ulrich. Thomas Findlay, William 
Courtleigh, Willard Mack, Horace Braham, 
Fuller Mellish. Pedro de Cordoba, Edwin 
Holt, Edward'Mack, Arthur J. Wood, and 
Jean Farrell. • 



FIND ACTOR'S BODY IN C A VE-IN 
In clearing away the debris of the col- 
lapsed subway excavation at Hanson 
Place. Brooklyn, workmen, on Monday, 
discovered the body of Clair Dockery, the 

Hippodrome actor, who has been missing 
since the cave-in occurred on April 17. 



SEIZE JULIA ARTHUR'S HOME 

Boston, April 30. — The War Depart- 
ment has confiscated the summer home of 
Julia Arthur, located in the Boston har- 
bor, and will at once begin the work of 
turning it into a fort. 



ERLANGER'S HOME BURNED 

Lawrence, L. I., April 30. — A. Is. Er- 
langer's beautiful summer home here was 
almost entirely destroyed by fire last Friday 
afternoon. 



ELTINGE SEASON EXTENDED 
Kansas City, April 28. — Instead of 
closing here this week, Julian Eltinge will 
play two weeks at the Blackstone, Chi- 
cago, closing there May 10. 

COL. CHAS. SEELEY DEAD 

Elmiba, N. T„ April 29.— Chas. W. See- 
ley, the circus man, died yesterday at his 
borne here of cancer, for which disease he 
had undergone several operations. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



May 2, 1917 



ACTS MUST NOT 

PLAY CABARETS 

IS ORDER 

FANCHON AND MARCO CANCELED 



Standard vaudeville acta that have 
been performing in cabarets, in addition 
to appearing in vaudeville theatres, were 
notified last week that, in the future, 
they must choose between the two fields. 
This order was issued through agents who 
book big time and neighborhood theatres 
in the United Booking Offices. 

During the past few months a number 
of standard acts have been appearing at 
cabarets along Broadway, in addition to 
playing vaudeville dates. The United 
Booking office had its attention called to 
this by the managers of various theatres, 
especially those in whose vicinity cabarets 
were conducted. These managers com- 
plained that acts which were booked to 
play in their theatres had previously ap- 
peared at cabarets in the neighborhood 
and their prestige as performers in the 
theatre had greatly deteriorated on that 
account. 

When the United Booking Office took 
the matter up it sent out men to check up 
the cabaret shows in the city. 

At the time the Palais Royal was sched- 
uled to open it was learned that several 
standard acts were engaged to appear in 
the show there. The performers were 
sent for and explained they did not know 
it was considered opposition to the the- 
atres. They were told they could com- 
plete their engagement at the place, but 
that, if they desired to obtain vaudeville 
work in the future, they should not renew 
their contracts. However, in this particu- 
lar establishment the vaudeville show did 
not make a very favorable impression 
with the patrons and, as a result, the 
majority of the acts cancelled. 

Fanchon and Marco, who are appearing 
at Shan ley's Broadway establishment, 
have been playing the neighborhood the- 
atres around New York in addition to 
their engagement at the restaurant dur- 
ing the past few months. A few weeks 
ago they played the Eighty-first Street 
Theatre, and were so well liked by the 
audience that Managing Director Shak- 

man arranged to have them play a return 
date at the house the last half of this 
week. 

Last Thursday he was notified by the 
United Booking Offices, where he obtains 
his acts, that it would not be advisable 
for him to play this act again, as they 
were playing the "opposition." After re- 
ceiving this word from the booking offices, 
Shakman cancelled the engagement of the 
team and their "Jazz'' band, and substi- 
tuted another act in their place on his 
bill. 

It is said that in the future acts that 
axe now playing cabarets will not he con- 
sidered for vaudeville bookings even 
though they will renounce cabaret work. 

The Loew, Fox and Moss circuits, how- 
ever, have not invoked the ruling. At 
the present time, there are several acts 
appearing on these circuits that are play- 
ing cabarets. 

PUBLISHERS ORGANIZE 

(Continued from page 3.) 

The present membership of the new 
organization is about twenty, consisting of 
the majority of the large popular music 
publishers of New York and to this list, 
the organizers plan to add the names of 
the prominent publishers in other cities. 

The dues of the society have been ar- 
ranged upon a sliding scale basis, the 
larger houses being placed in Class A and 
-paving a much higher rate than the smaller 
•ones, which will be designated as Class B. 



AGENT PLEADS FOR WIFE 

Cincinnati, April 30.— Capt Stanley 
Huntley Lewis, special publicity manager 
for "The Crisis" and known for twenty-five 
years in the show world as an advance 
agent, was removed from the Hotel Monro 
to the Jewish Hospital, Cincinnati, April 
18. His recovery is very doubtful, the 
breakage of both ear drums owing to 
abscesses having caused a total loss of 
hearing, and aggravated Bright's disease 
adding to the complications. The Elks are 
sparing no pains for his comfort. Any 
chance he might have for recovery is 
nullified though because of his grief over 
the absence of bis wife, for whom he calls 
continually and who is said to be with the 
Washburn Carnival. 

Capt. Lewis says he is not in need of 
funds. All that he desires is the presence 
of his wife, to whom be has been wedded 
over twenty years. He blames a married 
couple with the Washburn show for the 
estrangement. 



CASTLE HERE ON VISIT 

Vernon Castle arrived in town last 
■week for a five days' vacation, after thir- 
teen months abroad in the Royal Flying 
Corps in England. He was wearing the 
Croix de Guerre, which he received from 
the French government, for bravery. 



KLAW CHANGES HOUSE POLICY 
Seattle. Wash., April 28. — Marc Klaw, 
of Klaw and Erlanger, when in the city 
recently, announced that the Metropolitan 
Theatre, of which they are owners, will 
hereafter house all road shows coming to 
this city. George T. Hood, formerly man- 
ager of the Moore Theatre, will be man- 
ager of the Metropolitan in place of Lewis 
Haase, who goes East to take charge of a 
house near New York City. 



NEW HOUSE FOR WASHINGTON 

Washington, D. C, April 22. — "Tom" 
Moore, manager of the Strand and Gar- 
den motion picture theatres here, has pur- 
chased a site at F and Eleventh Streets 
on which be will erect a big theatre for 
pictures. It will be an up-to-date struc- 
ture, with a seating capacity of 3,000. 



"THE LOVE MILL" POSTPONED 

Chicago, April 29. — Announcement is 
made by Manager Harry J. Powers that 
Andreas Dippel's latest musical produc- 
tion, "The Love Mill," . which was 
scheduled to open here last Sunday, but 
failed to do so, will open next Sunday. 



OLIVER IN ADVANCE OF SHOW 

Decatur, 111., April 28. — W. L. Oliver, 
of this city, will have the advance on Geo. 
Engesser's "What Happened to Ole.'.' The 
show will play under canvass the coming 
season, opening May 14 at St. Peter, 
Minn. Oliver left for Chicago, April 23. 



DONALD GALLAHER MARRIES 

Philadelphia. April 28. — Donald Gal- 
Iaher and Beatrice Noyes. both of "The 
Country Cousin" company, appearing a. 
the Broad St. Theatre, were mnrried here 
last week. 




MANY SHOWS TO 

CLOSE THIS 

WEEK 

END OF SEASON IN SIGHT 



The first bell indicating the ending of 
the season of 1916-17 has been sounded, 
for this week marks the closing of three 
attractions that have run in new York 
for from four to more than Beven months, 
and several that have entertained New 
Yorkers for lesser periods. 

These closings portend that the season 
will be remarkable for its briefness as 
well as for its big business. It is rarely 
that the season ends before the latter 
part of May or the first of June, so that 
the present one looks to be weeks shorter 
than the average. 

One of the long run shows closing, first 
place belongs to "The Big Show" at the 
Hippodrome, which opened last Fall. This 
closes with 425 consecutive performances 
to its credit. 

Maude Adams is in her last week at the 
Empire in "A Kiss for Cinderella," and 
with her final performance on Saturday 
night will conclude a stay of twenty 
weeks. It was originally intended Miss 
Adams should stay for eight weeks, but 
big attendance warranted two extensions 
of the original booking. 

"The Wanderer," which has been one 
of the season's big hits also closes on 
Saturday night after a run of nearly four 
months, during the greater portion of 
which period capacity business has ruled. 

"The Cose of Lady Camber" concludes 
its stay at the Lyceum, while Arnold 
Daly in "The Very Minute" ends his 
stay at the Belasco, which house will close 
its doors for the season. 

"The Century Girl" closed its long run 
last Saturday and the sole entertainment 
at that house till next Fall will be fur- 
nished in the Cocoanut Grove on the 
roof. 



NEWS STANDS MUST GO 

As a result of the work of widening 
Sixth Avenue and the building of stations 
for the new Subway in the Rialto district 
the Bureau of Encumbrances has ordered 
the removal of several news stands along 
these thoroughfares. All of the stands 
along Sixth Avenue will be eliminated with 
the exception of one located at Forty-sixth 
Street after June 1. The news stand on 
the Forty-fifth Street aide of the New York 
Theatre building will not be granted a new 
license after Jane 1, and at that time the 
news stand at Broadway and Forty-seventh 
Street will be compelled to change its loca- 
tion on the side street by being moved fifty 
feet east of its present location. 



Among the other closings are "The 
Fugitive," with Emily Stevens at the 
Thirty-ninth Street Theatre; "Colonel 
Newcome," which Sir Herbert Tree has 
been giving at the New Amsterdam; 
"Come Out of the Kitchen." with Ruth 
Cbatterton at the Cohan; the Washington 
Square Players, at the Comedy; the Col- 
ored Players at the Garrick, and the 
Aborn Opera Co. at the Academy of 
Music, Brooklyn. 

LADY AGNESE 

Lady Agnese. whose attractive photo 
adorns the front cover of this week's Clip- 
per, a short time ago brought to America 
six pretty Irish Colleens, and presented 
them in vaudeville in a typical "Irish 
Evening at Home." 

The act consists of singing*, dancing and 
playing the real Irish harp in a very en- 
tertaining way, and has made a decided hit 
wherever it has appeared. In fact, it is 
declared to be one of the most pleasing 
acts that has appeared for some time. 



BROADHURST COMPLETES CAST 

The completed cast for "Over the 
'Phone," George Broadhurst's new comedy, 
which will be produced at Nixon's Apollo, 
Atlantic City, the week of May 14th. con- 
sists of Henry Kolker. W. J. Ferguson, 
Will Deming. Alma Belwin, Joseph Allen, 
Marion Yantine. Elizabeth Crandall, J. R. 
Armstrong and Adin Wilson. 



FROLIC CLOSING EARLIER 

With the going into effect of the 
Mayor's one o'clock closing order last 
Monday night, the midnight performances 
of the "Ziegfeld Frolic" and the Cocoanut 
Grove show were started at 11:30 p. m. 
and ended promptly at one o'clock. This 
rule was also observed at all of the Broad- 
way restaurants which have revues. All 
of them were started from a half to an 
hour earlier than usual 'and, when the 
closing hour arrived, all of the entertain- 
ment was over. It was learned that a 
good many establishments which are 
housing revues will discontinue them 
shortly and go back to the old style of 
entertainment. 



CAIRNS BROS. OPEN TENT SHOW 

Bixte Mound, ID., April 28. — The Cairns 
Bros. Tent Show opened here last Satur- 
day to good business. They have got en- 
tire new uniforms for their ball team this 
season. Mrs. J. W. Rickard, the mother 
of the Seven Cairns Boys, will travel with 
the show this season. 



STETSON AND HUBER 
In Vaudeville 



ALBERT LEONI ENLISTS 

Washington, April 28. — Albert Leoni, 
assistant treasurer of the Gayety Theatre, 
has resigned to enlist in the U. S. Navy. 



ARUSS SUES FOR $25,000 

Alleging a breach of contract by the 
Herbert Brenon Film Company, George 
Arliss has brought suit against the com- 
pany for $25,000. Arliss says be entered 
into an agreement with the Brenon Com- - 
pany last November to stand in front of 
the camera five hours a day for five weeks, 
bnt that when he was ready to carry out 
his part of the contract, the company re- 
fused to let him do so. 



ELMENDORF AT THE ELTINGE 

A, H. Woods will present Dwight L. 
Elmendorf at the Eltinge Theatre, for a 
series of illustrated lectures. His first 
lecture, given Sunday evening, May 13, 
will be "Around the World in Two Hours." 
These lectures are to be given in Phila- 
delphia the greater part of next week. 



"ON GUARD" CLOSES 

Atherton Brownell's "On Guard" closed 
Sunday night. Under its original title of 
"The Master of Anns" and with a re- 
organized company, beaded by Paul Caze- 
neuve, and with a more adequate produc- 
tion, the play will fill Canadian bookings, 
in the Fall. 



BROOKE STAGING NEW PLAY 

Clifford Brooke, who staged "Peter Ibbet- 
son" is now staging George Broad- 
hurst's new comedy "Over the 'Phone." 
"Quinneys" and "Our Betters" are among 
the other successful plays staged by Mr. 
Brooke recently. 



GUS HILL TAKING REST 

Gus Hill is taking a week's vacation 

from his office, spending his time at his 
Summer borne in Locust, X. J., which he 
is getting into sbape for the Summer sea- 
son. 




COONEY SISTERS 
On the Loew Time 



May. 2, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



N.V.A. TO GET WHITE RATS 

CL UB HOUS E, IS REPORT 

Financial Transactions of Last Week, Disclosing Plentiful Supply 

of Money for All Creditors, Start Rumors to 

That Effect Along Broadway 

From developments which took place 
this week in the affairs of the White Rats 
and the financial problems surrounding 
their clubhouse, many persons familiar 
with the situation would not be surprised 
to see the National Vaudeville Artists, 
Ine, sheltered, shortly, by the building 
which less than a month ago was the 
abode of Harry Mountford and his ad- 
herents. 

These conclusions were based upon a 
series of financial transactions which 
have extended over the past ten days, in 
which most of the White Rats indebted- 
ness has been wiped out and nearly all 
creditors have had their obligations satis- 
fied. 

When it was found by Mountford that 
the organization could no longer afford to 
conduct the clubhouse and meet its in- 
coming bills, he notified the Mutual Bank, 
which held $69,600 of first mortgage 
twenty year six per cent gold bonds as 
security for a loan of $45,000 of the fact, 
and the bank officials immediately placed 
the bonds on sale at a Wall Street auction 
room These bonds were put up last Fri- 
day and, as the pledgee did not redeem 
them, the bank bought them in for $100. 
This action by the bank placed in its 
hands the majority of the $125,000 bond 
issue of the White Rats Realty Corpora- 
tion. 

It is believed in theatrical circles that 

when this transaction took place there 

were persons interested in the movement 

~ who were desirous of obtaining control of 

the clubhouse. 

That a plentiful supply of money is 
forthcoming from somewhere was demon- 
started ten days ago when a check was 
issued to Jacob J. Lubell who held a chat- 
tel mortgage on the White Rats clubhouse 
furnishings for $5,000. It was signed by 
Mountford and countersigned by the pres- 
ident of the Mutual bask. At the same 
time $2,000 .was paid to Bassillios Maya- 
siodis, who had the restaurant privilege 
for the clubhouse, to vacate the premises 
immediately. This check was also signed 
by Mountford. 

After these matters were disposed of, 
it is said that Mountford assigned the 
leasehold of the ground on which the club- 
house stands to a man named Cochrane, 
a clerk in another bank. The leasehold 
was obtained by the club on September 
20, 1911, and was to run for a period of 
twenty-one years from May, 1911, with a 
renewal option of twenty-one years more. 
The rental for the leasehold was $7,500 
and taxes per annum. 

It in said that Cochrane will hold this 
leasehold until papers of incorporation for 
a corporation to-be called the "229 West 
Forty-sixth Street Company" have been 
accepted by the Secretary of State, at 
Albany. Then he is to transfer it to the 
corporation. The identity of the incor- 
porators could not be learned the early 
part of this week. 

At the present time there is $15,500 
outstanding taxes against the property, 
the April rent of $625 for the leasehold 
is overdue and other outstanding obliga- 
tions of the organization amounting to 
several thousand dollars will have to be 
satisfied. 

The Cupper representative was in- 
formed that the persons who were to take 
over the property will pay all these debts 
and that they would also assume the re- 
sponsibility for the payment of the Gold 
Bonds when they became due. One-third 
of the face value of these bonds is pay- 
able in January, 1919, another third in 
January, 1926, and the last third in Jan- 
uary, 1932. 

There was a meeting of the bondholders 
hut week at the offices of the Columbia 
Trust Co., trustee of the bond issue, and 



all were assured by the officials of that 
institution that they would receive pay- 
ment in full for their bonds at the time 
the various installments matured. 

Mountford was given sufficient money at 
the time the leasehold was assigned to 
settle all the outstanding debts of the 
organization. It was said that the major- 
ity of them were settled by him. 

The books of the club were taken to the 
offices of the Mutual bank last week, 
where they will be gone over by expert 
accountants and, if the examination 
proves satisfactory, it was learned that a 
substantial amount of money will be 
turned over to the White Rats in addi- 
tion to the liquidation of all their debts. 
When one of the persons acquainted 
with the details of the transaction was 
seen by a Clipper representative regard- 
ing the future of the clubhouse, he said 
that it could only be used for a clubhouse 
and that it was quite likely the new cor- 
poration which would take it over intend- 
ed to use it for such purposes. 

None of the officers of the White Rats 
were allowed to have any part in this 
transaction. Mountford assumed full re- 
sponsibility for the transaction. 

W. J. Fitzpatrick, international presi- 
dent of the White Rats, has been at his 
home in Waterbury, Conn., since the sus- 
pension of the strike, and is said to have 
had no knowledge of Mountford's opera- 
tions. Several members of the Board of 
Directors of the club, when asked regard- 
ing the financial transactions, said that 
Mountford had not taken them into his 
confidence and that they had no knowl- 
edge of the details of the club's financial 
affairs. 

The White Rats left the clubhouse last 
Wednesday morning. All of the house 
help and office help were discharged at 
the time. 

At a meeting held the previous evening, 
Mountford told the members that they 
were to leave the place the following day 
and that all the White Rats business would 
be left in abeyance until he had returned 
from a vacation which he would start on 
shortly. Several members at the meeting 
suggested that they get club rooms, but 
this did not appeal to the International 
Executive. He told them that he would 
shortly take offices where he would trans- 
act the business of the club, but that they 
would not have any club or lounging 
rooms at this time. 

A few days later he rented an office in 
a bnilding- at Broadway and Fortieth 
Street, where be and James Fitzpatrick. 
who was the bookkeeper of the White 
Rats, are installed. There is no name on 

the door of the office and only through 
making a canvas of the building, going 
from floor to floor, can the offices be lo- 
cated. None of the employees of the 
building appear to know the name of the 
tenants of the office or the nature of their 
business. 

Mountford. sinco leaving the White Ruts 
clubhouse, has taken up his residence at 
the Broadway Central Hotel. 

It was learned on Monday that those of 
the members who stuck to Mountford 
throughout the strike, are very angry at 
him and declare they will have nothing 
further to do with the international exec- 
utive in the future. 



YIDDISH THEATRICALS PROSPER 

The prosperity of the present theatrical 
season has not been confined to English 
productions, as Edwin A. Relkin. known 
as the combined K. & E. and Sbubert 
Office for Yiddish plays, can testify. He 
is in the height of bis busy season, and 
is managing tours of the following com- 
panies: Jacob P. Adler and company, in 
"The Three Generatins" ; Bessie Thom- 
ashefsky and the Peoples Theatre Co., in 
"Winsome Susie" ; "Clear Conscience" 
company, with Max Gabel and Jennie 
Goldsteine ; Mme. Kenny Lipzin and com- 
pany in "The Red Lights"; David Kessler 
and company in "Motfee Gnnov"; Malonia 
Lobel and company in "The Saleslady," 
and Prager-Juvelier company in "God's 
Gift." Besides these road companies, 
Relkin is managing and supplying the 
attraction for the Peoples Theatre, Gabel 
Theatre and Kessler Theatre, New York: 
the Liberty Theatre, East New York, 
Arch Street Theatre, Philadelphia, and 
Empire Theatre, Chicago. He also man- 
ages the Grand Theatre, New York, which 
will be run the entire Summer as a stock 
burlesque house. 



MOTHER OF NAN MADIGAN DIES 

AvEBTiXPARK, N. Y., April 28. — Mrs. 
Kate V. Madigan, a non-professional, the 
mother of Nan Madigan and wife of Pat 
Madigan, died here recently after an illness 
of three months. 



NEW "FOLLIES" REHEARSING 

Rehearsals of the "Follies of 1917" be- 
gan last Monday under the personal di- 
rection of Florenz Ziegfeld. The show 
opens May 28 in Atlantic City. 



"HER SOLDIER BOY" MOVES 

"Her Soldier Boy," with Clifton Craw- 
ford, moved from the Astor to the Lyric 
on Monday night. There is only one 
change in the company. 




GAMBOL AUCTION MAY 15TH 

The auction sale of seats for the open- 
ing performance of the Lambs' Gambol 
will be held on Tuesday afternoon. May 
15, at 4 o'clock, in the Hudson Theatre. 
The principal auctioneers will be Irving 
Cobb, Augustus Thomas, -Frank Tinuey, 
Leon Errol, William Collier, Clifton 
Crawford, Andrew Mack, George V. Ho- 
bart, R H. Burnside, George McFarland 
and Jack Hazzard. The Lambs will gam- 
bol for an entire week at the New Am- 
sterdam Theatre, beginning Sunday night, 
May 27. 

THEATRE PHOTOGRAPHER DIES 

Philadelphia, April 28. — Frederick 
Giitekunst, a few years ago one of the best 
known theatrical photographers in the 
country, died at his home here yesterday. 
He was born In Germany eighty-five years 
ago and come to America when a boy. He 
opened a gallery in Arch street in 1854, 
and conducted it for more than sixty years. 



KEMBLE ACQUIRES THEATRE 

Wm. H. Kemble, the Brooklyn motion 
picture manager, last week signed con- 
tracts whereby he becomes lessee of the 

Brighton Beach Music Hall for a term 
of years. The policy of the house has 
not been announced, but it can be stated 
that, it will be given over wholly or in 
part to the exhibition of motion pictures. 



BENJAMIN CHAP1N 

Benjamin Chapin, the world renowned im- 
personator of Abraham Lincoln, has just re- 
leased the first group of Lincoln pictures which 
he runs under the general head of "The Lincoln 
Cycle." 

In the "released group he treats of My 
Mother," "My Father." "Myself" and "The 
Call to Arms.'' 

Mr. Chapin portrays first the father and then 
the President and he makes each a separate 
and distinct character. Of course his work as 
President Lincoln is the best, for bis portrayal 
is Lincoln to the life. He looks and acts like 
the martyred President. He carries out to 
the minutest detail his every characteristic as 
handed down by Lincoln's biographers, and so 
closely has he studied them that a gray haired 
man was heard to remark "if I Believed in 
the supernatural 1 should sav President Lin- 
coln had come to life again. 



"DOC" POTTER WINS SUIT 

"Doc" Potter has recovered $62 
against Charles Daniels, of the Grand 
Opera Honse, Brooklyn, for the loan of 
some horses, donkeys and a wagon which 
Potter alleged had never been paid for. 
August Dreyer appeared in court as Pot- 
ter's attorney. 

"WHAT NEXT7" MOR05COS NEXT 

"What Next" is the title of a new 
musical comedy which Oliver Morosco will 
give an early try-out at the Burbank 
Theatre, Los Angeles. This is the third 
work written in collaboration by Oliver 
Morosco, Elmer Harris and Earl Carroll. 



MARKS PURCHASES THEATRE 

New Orleans, La., April 28. — M. 
Marks, for some time manager of the Ideal 
Theatre, bas purchased the interests of bis 
partners, Messrs. Jacobs and Landy, and 
will have exclusive charge of the bouse 
hereafter. 



LYCEUM, WASHINGTON, SOLD 

Washington, April 28. — The old Ly- 
ceum Theatre has changed hands once 
more. It was sold last week at auction 
for $68,500 to Charles C. Knnpp. acting as 
ngent for the Empire Circuit Co. 

START NEW FALL RIVER HOUSE 

FALL Kiveb, Mass., April 28. — Contrac- 
tors began work this week on the new 
Kmpire Theatre to be built for A. A. Spiti 
of Providence, R. I. It is to be completed 
for opening by Labor Day. 



LONDON WANTS BESS FRANKLYN 

Bessie Franklyn, who finished her sea- 
eon with* the closing of "Chin Chin," is 
wanted for a London musical revue, but 
moms to favor another contract with the 
Dillingham forces. 



IDA GOLD MARRIED 

Oakland, C»l., April 28.— Ida Gold, 
who was prima donna of Rock and Fulton's 
"Candy Shop," bas been married to Paul 
Ascli, who was musical director of the came 
orennizntinn. 



EMILY STEVENS TO DO COMEDY 

Oliver Morosco has engaged Emily 
Stevens to appear in August at the Mo- 
rosco Theatre in a comedy especially 
written for her by Frederic and Fanny 
Hatton. " 



BERNHARDT IMPROVES 

Mme. Bernhardt is slowly improving, 
according to the statement of her phy- 
sicians, who announce that her general 
condition is encouraging. 

G1BNEY CLOSES SEASON 

William Gibney, advance agent for C. 
R. Reno's "Human Hearts" company, 
closed April 21, after tilling a season of 
sixty-six weeks. 



OAKLAND CLOSES CABARETS 

Oakland, Cal., April 28. — Cafes and 
cabarets here were all closed down last 
week by the Woman's Welfare League. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



May 2, 1917 



^^^r^ %J* 




LOEW AGENTS TO 

FIGHT FOX 

OFFICE 

CANCELLED ACTS CAUSE TROUBLE 

Tbe Vaudeville Artists Representatives, 
an organization composed of agruts who 
book acta in the Loew offices, held a meet- 
ing last Friday at which it was decided to 
adopt summary measures shortly, regard- 
ing tie arbitrary cancellation of standard 
acts playing Pox time. The agents con- 
tend that, alter many acts have played 
either the Loew, United or Moss circuits 
and have come to be considered standard 
acts, they are cancelled as soon as they hit 
Fox time. On an average, five or six of 
them are cancelled after the first perfor- 
mance each Monday and Thursday, the 
agents declare. 

This treatment of acts, has been going 
on all season, the agents declare, and the 
Loew agents who have placed acts in Fox 
houses seem to be greatly put out over the 
matter. They have taken the question up 
with the Fox people but get no satisfaction 
they say. 

They declare that the system is very 
harmful to them. All season, they state, 
they have been booking acts under conjunc- 
tive contracts, by which, after a turn com- 
pleted the Fox time, it went right into 
Loew time. However, when man; of the 
turns received a cancellation notice in the 
Fox houses, they refused to work the Loew 
time, going to other circuits. 

This move on the part of performers 
naturally hit the pockets of the agents, and. 
after persistent efforts to remedy the situa- 
tion they began to rebel and have decided 
to take matters into their own hands, they 
state. 

The agents that are booking acts through 
the Loew office are Irving Cooper. Chas. 
J. Fitzpatrick, Mark Levy, Harry Pincus. 
Billy Atwell. Frank Rohm Agency. Louis 
Pincus, Wesley & Duffus, Abe Thalheimer. 
M S. Epstein, Lou Leslie. Samuel Baer- 
witz, Tom Jones, and Harry Shen. 

EGAN PLANS RECRUITING WEEK 

Next week is what Chris Egan style* 
"recruiting week at the Royal." In eon- 
junction with the recruiting station now 
outside of the theatre, Major Hughes, of 
the United States Recruiting Office, and 
Majors Corbett and Wright, of the Second 
Field Artillery, will address the audience 
at each performance. There will also be 
five-minute recruiting talks from the stage 
by prominent Rronx officials. A battery 
of field artillery will parade in front of the 
theatre. 



ANNA CHANDLER SUIT DROPPED 
Mrs. Anna Dreyex, who retained ao 
attorney to begin suit against Anna 
Chandler for $10,000 damages, which she 
said she sustained through the actress 
alienating the affections of David Dreyer. 
has decided to drop the suit. Dreyer is 
Miss Chandler's pianist. 

MABEL HAMILTON TO DO "SINGLE" 

Mabel Hamilton, formerly of Clark and 
Hamilton, will return to vaudeville in a 
"single" act written for her by Blanche 
Merrill. M. S. Bentham win manage the 
act 



BLANCHARD TRIAL POSTPONED 

The trial of Charles A. Blanchard, which 
was to have been heard last week, has 
been postponed until May 21. 

OFFER NEW ACT AT KEENEYS 

Harry Lang, Bnd Williamson and Jack 
Howard opened Monday at Keeney*a, 
Brooklyn, with a new act. 



81ST EXECUTIVES CHANGE 

Eddie Cline, formerly treasurer of the 
Alhambra Theatre, is now treasurer of 
the Eighty-first Street Theatre. Frank 
Girard, formerly manager of the Orpbeum 
Theatre, Brooklyn, is now house manager 
of this house, which will remain open all 
Summer, playing vaudeville and feature 
pictures twice daily as heretofore. 



BLACKFACEACTS 

ARE REGAINING 

POPULARITY 



HODGES TO BE DRUGGIST 

Robert Henry Hodges, who was active 
in the White Bats movement, and, as a 
result, was placed on the "undesirable" 
list of the Vaudeville Managers' Protect- 
ive Association, is negotiating for the 
purchase of a drug store at Freeport, 
Long Island. It is said that Hodges will 
no longer pursue his theatrical career. 

MULLER AND KIRK REHEARSING 

Maud Muller, formerly of Muller and 
Stanley, and more recently doing a single 
turn, and Ethel Kirk, formerly of Kirk 
and Forgarty, are rehearsing a new act 
which will shortly be shown in a local 
house. The act is going to be styled after 
the old Melville and Stetson turn. 



MANY PLAYING ON BIG TIME 



ATLANTIC CITY TO OPEN LATE 

Atlantic Cttt, N. J., May 1. — Keith's 
Theatre here will not open its season until 
July 2. The management expects to 
equal the Palace Theatre, New York, in 
tbe excellence of its bills. 



That vaudeville is seemingly, going back 
to the days of minstrelsy and blackface, is 
becoming more and more apparent with 
the increased number of bookings that 
blackface performers are receiving on the 
big vaudeville circuits and the hearty ova- 
tions such acts are now being accorded by 
vandeville audiences. 

With his ear to the ground, Lew Dock- 
stader has been quick to catch the trend 
of the times and is preparing a new min- 
strel production which will soon see vaude- 
ville. 

Probably never before has the Orpheum 
Circuit had so many blackface and min- 
strel acts making its rounds. Among them 
are the Seven Honey Boys; Blue Bert 
Kenny, of Kenny and Nobody ; Ren Deeley : 
Harry Fern ; Lew Dockstader, and Walter 
Weems. 

Among the blackface and minstrel acts 
on tbe U. B. O. time are Mclntyre and 
Heath ; Tennessee Ten and Eddie Leonard. 




JULIAN ELT1NGE 

Julian Eltinge closes his season in Chicago, May 19th. "Cousin Lucy" has been 
doing a capacity business all over America, this having been Mr. Eltinge's longest 
tour and covering more territory than ever before. 

Mr. Eltinge will now start rehearsals on the playlet he wrote for Miss Jane 
Oaker, and it will be seen in the vaudeville houses within a fortnight. 



TINNEY IN COCOANUT GROVE 

When the "Century Girl" closed Frank 
Tinney returned to Freeport where he in- 
tended taking a well earned rest. But it 
seems that Tinney's contract with the 
Dillingham-Ziegfeld offices require seven 
more weeks before he will be at liberty, 
so, starting last Monday night, he inter- 
polated his act at the Cocoanut Grove as 
part of the performance and will finish out 
the season there. 



BROWN AFTER WALKING RECORD 

George N. Brown, who has just com- 
pleted a tour of the Orpheum Circuit, is 
going to try to lower the world's walking 
record between Philadelphia and New 
York, and has retained Dixon Van Valk- 
enberg, publicity director of the Winfred 
St. Claire companies, to train him for 
the proposed hike, which will be made 
some time in June. 



DARLING AIDING U. S. 

Lieutenant Daley, of the Eighth Coast 
Artillery, is making a plea for recruits 
from the stage of the Colonial Theatre dur- 
ing the intermission at every performance. 
He pays a high tribute to Manager Al 
Darling, claiming that Darling was the first 
to put a recrniting station in front of his 
theatre. 



WILKENS SIGNS WITH MUTUAL 

Jacksonville, Fla., April 28. — Charlie 

Wilkens, formerly of Wilkens and Wilkens, 
has signed a two year contract with the 
Mutual Film Co. and will appear as star 
comedian in a series of comedy pictures to 
be made by the American Film Corpora- 
tion, to be released through Mutual. He 
will make a trip to New York about June 1. 



AUTO TOUR FOR TOWLE 

Joe Towle, who, beginning Aug. 5, will 
play the entire Orpheum tour, opening at 
the Orpheum, San Francisco, will make 
the trip to the coast in his new Stutz 
roadster, leaving his summer home at Free- 
port the middle of July. 

SAM MANN CLOSES 

Sam Mann and his company of six hava 
closed their season for the Summer after 
playing eight weeks with Aaron Hoffmann's 
new act "The Question." They resume 
early in August. 



LEVAN HAS NEW ACT 

Ed. Levan has prepared a novel ar- 
rangement of melodies and illuminated 
slides, which he will shortly introduce ia 
the two-a-day. He calls it a historical 
education, accompanied by martial mel- 
odies. 



LOWE WITH DURAND 

Maxim P. Lowe, formerly of the H. B. 
Marinelli office, but who*recently conduct- 
ed his own vaudeville office, is now lo- 
cated in the offices of Paul Durand. 



HUSSEY HAS NEW ACT 

Jimmy Hussey will do a new act in the 
form of a sketch next season in which he 
will be assisted by four others. No title 
has as yet been given the sketch. 



ACROBAT SURRENDERS GUNS 

George Bratta, a vaudeville acrobat, 
surrendered five revolvers to Police Head- 
quarters last week because he was an 

unnaturalized German resident. 



LOEW THEATRE FOR LOUISVILLE 

LotnBvnxE, Ky„ April 28. — It ia re- 
ported that Marcus Loew is planning the 
erection of .a $250,000 vaudeville theatre 
in this city. 



NEW BANKOFF & GIRLIE ACT 
Bankoff and Girlie are preparing a new 
girl act. Their old act will again take the 
road with a new couple of principals. 



May 2, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 




RIVERSIDE 

• "Circumstances over which we have no 
control have made us late this afternoon," 
said James J. Morton, when at 2:45 he 
appeared to introduce the first act, and, 
in consequence, the performance was a 
late one, almost lapping over into the 
evening. 

The "circumstance" was Jean Adair's 
automobile, which is built on' such mas- 
sive lines as to prevent its entrance 
through the theatre's back door, and as a 
result the entire stage crew was kept 
busy for hours before the big car could 
be got onto the stage. 

Ameta, the Parisian mirror dancer, gave 
her familiar repertoire, which pleased 
greatly, her fourth number, the dance 
Fleur de Lys, being particularly well exe- 
cuted and brought numerous recalls. 

Brierre and King, new to the Riverside, 
started slowly, but as the act progressed 
it picked up wonderfully until at the 
finish it scored one of the substantial hits 
of the bill. 

James B. Carson, in "The Models 
Abroad," duplicated the big success he has 
met in all local houses. It is difficult to 
conceive of a better miniature musical 
comedy than this. Its plot is consistent, 
the lyrics clever, music good and the entire 
company is a capable one. It will doubt- 
less be as lasting a vehicle for him as the 
famous "Bed Heads." 

Leo Beers, with bis blonde baby grand 
piano, his modish attire and air of assur- 
ance, played several selections admirably, 
whistled a couple of numbers well and 
sang badly. As he has no voice to speak 
of he should at least cultivate enuncia- 
tion, as that is the only way in which he 
can hope to put over his songs. Whether 
he affects a lisp or is merely careless, 
many of his words are almost unintel- 
ligible. 

Jean Adair, in "Maggie Taylor — 
Waitress," closed intermission, and this 
gem of a sketch met with its usual en- 
thusiastic reception. - 

Miss Adair makes of the poor waitress, 
who for fifteen years has been hoping and 
praying for her boy's return, one of the 
most lovable stage mothers seen in many 

seasons. Although comedy predominates 
throughout, Miss Adair made so much of 
the few pathetic portions that there were 
many wet eyes in the audience, when she 
recognizes in the rich stranger, who is to 
take her away from poverty, her long lost 
boy. 

Daisy Jean, billed as one of Belgium's 
social leaders, who has entered vaudeville 
Kg a means of raising money for her poor 
countrymen, is a musician of talent and 
ability. She performs well upon a num- 
ber of instruments, so well, in fact, that 
her billing matter, as far as it goes to 
make friends for her act, is really unneces- 
sary. She has sufficient ability to hold a 
late spot on any bill. 

Joe Laurie and Aleen Bronson found 
many friends present who missed their 
supper to witness "Lost and Found," the 
clever act which they have been present- 
ing for several seasons. This pair is in- 
deed a clever one- and their offering was 
keenly appreciated. 

Bock and White found the going excep- 
tionally hard in the closing spot, especial- 
ly as it was long after the usual supper 
hour when they came on and that portion 
of the audience left in the theatre was 
growing restless. Position is everything, 
even on a' vaudeville bill as Bock and 
White, at the conclusion of Monday after- 
noon's performance, were doubtless ready 
to admit. 

They curtailed the act considerably, and 
Miss White, who is still in very poor 
voice, sang but little. She appears in 
need of a rest, especially her voice, which 
is beginning to show the strain of a long 
season. W. V. 



SHOW REVIEWS 

(Continued on page 11) 



PALACE 

The bill started off with Herbert's Dogs, 
who do various stunts assisted by cats and 
pigeons. Herbert has three dogs on the 
style of Meeban's leaping hounds, but Her- 
bert is not the showman Meehan is. The 
act started slowly and finished fast. 

George Lyons, in the second spot, did not 
set anything on fire, although most of hia 
talk is done in rhyme. His playing on the 
harp is, as usual, up to the standard. One 
song could be dispensed with, but the re- 
mainder just fit hia style of entertainment. 
A little dash of pep, a trifle more rag-rime 
or even the making of the camp stool in 
which he sits, more presentable, would fix 
matters up a trifle. 

Nina Payne was on third and was the 
big hit of the first part. 

Miss Payne has a select routine of dances 
that no one will copy from her for the 
simple reason that there is hardly anyone 
who has the ability to do them. Her of- 
fering is not alone artistic, but is a fast 
moving treat to vaudeville, and her brief 
attempt at pantomime disclosed that she 
also possesses histrionic talent. 

Doyle and Dixon were on fourth, with a 
neat routine of dance steps and some 
pointed songs, concluding with the "Rube" 
sheriff number they were identified with in 
"The Century Girl." They also were a big 
bit with their nimble footwork and ability 
as eccentric dancers. 

Montgomery and Perry closed the first 
part. Billie Montgomery uses two pianos 
in this act and plays both well. Outside 
of this, there is little to the act excepting 
the harmonica playing of the colored mem- 
ber, who is not billed. Several gags are 
old and the usual piano business is too 
familiar to dwell upon. 

Dp to this point only one woman had 
appeared on the stage. 

After intermission, George McKay and 
Ottie Ardine supplied the first really good 
laugh of the show. Besides new wardrobe, 
gags and dances, the act proved more than 
diverting on account of its being real vaude- 
ville without any frills. McKay has 
greatly improved as a light comedian, and 
Miss Ardine looks better and dances bet- 
ter than ever. 

Sam Bernard followed with a routine of 
talk and songs which are reviewed more 
fully under New Acts. 

After Bernard came dainty Ethlyn Clark 
and Joseph E. Howard in what the pro- 
gram describes as "a revue produced under 
the personal direction of Howard, who con- 
ceived this idea of introducing bis melodies 
surrounded by atmosphere." This act is 
also reviewed under New Acts. 

The show- as a whole ran smoothly and 
let out early on account of the omission 
of "Patria." 

Business was of capacity calibre. 

S. X. H. 



ROME THEATRE CHANGES 

Rome, N. Y., April 30. — The Carroll 
Theatre here will change its policy next 
week from playing musical tabloid acta 
to operating a vaudeville show. Five acts 
and motion pictures are to constitute the 
program. The bill will change on Mon- 
day and Thursday. 



LUKE WILSON HONORED BY ELKS 

Luke Wilson, the oldest living gymnast, 
was the guest of honor and chief per- 
former at an entertainment Saturday 
night at the Elks Club in Forty-third 
Street. Wilson is about eighty years of 
age, and for half a centur y wa s a mem- 
ber of the famous trio of Wilson Broth- 
ers, which included Luke, Leo and Mi- 
chael. He has been an honored Elk for 
nearly half a century. At present he is 
employed as stage hand at the Hudson 
Theatre. 



COLONIAL 

An excellent bill is provided at the 
Colonial this week. 

Although Billy Abbott and Elmore White 
open the show, they deserve a better posi- 
tion. However, there seems to be no other 
logical place for them, unless they change 
spot with Eddie Kane and Jay Herman 
(New Act) who open the second half of 
the bill. Anyway, they put over a num- 
ber of popular songs well, their Italian 
number and Hawaiian parody scoring par- 
ticularly heavy. They received a warm 
hand at Monday's matinee from what 
proved to be a rather cold audience. 

They were followed by the five Kita- 
muras, featuring Roman and Tommy Kita- 
mura. This quintette represent the last 
word in Japanese acts, for everything about 
the turn spells class. The contortionist 
does a particularly effective bit of work, 
and received gratifying applause. 

Frank Orth and William J. Dooley have 
a "nut" offering entitled, "The Fool De- 
tective." At times the lines begin to get 
tiresome and, if several references to 
"Mabel and Charlie" could be eliminated, 
the act would be the better for it. The 
"nut" is very clever, bis dancing being par- 
ticularly so. His falls caused many laughs. 
The other member of the team makes a 
good straight. The hand-shaking episode 
was an entertaining piece of business. 

Emma Cams received a good hand upon 
her entrance. Assisted by Larry Comer, 
she went over for a smashing hit. She gets 
a lot of fun out of the fact that she baa 
reduced considerably of late and the ladies 
at the matinee seemed to enjoy her refer- 
ences to means of getting thin. She sang 
her numbers very well indeed, and the 
Irish-Hawaiian number was particularly 
well thought out, showing her at her best. 
She gives most performers cards and 
spades in putting over a patirotic number. 
She put every ounce of pep she possessed 
into a musical plea asking everyone to 
"root for Uncle Sam." 

The dance at the end of her turn was 
well done and received the laughs it de- 
served. 

Larry Comer contributed several song 
numbers to the act which went over suc- 
cessfully. 

Truly Shattuck and Marta Golden found 
the audience difficult to reach, despite the 
fact that they are a clever duo. Miss 
Gold en '8 song concerning the family goings- 
on when the minister comes to tea, 'was 
well rendered. The hat song dragged a bit. 
The pair's impression of a jazz band isn't 
so far from right. Miss Shattuck playing 
a ukelele, while her partner plays both a 
bass drum and a hair-comb. This business 
is the strongest thing in the act, and they 
wisely use it as a closer. 

The next act proved to be another girl 
team, composed of Iva Lancton and Bonnie 
Gay lord. The audience seemed to. like the 
idea of the offering, when the girls, appear- 
ing first in blackface, have a fight upon 
the stage which they continue in their 
dressing rooms (scene 2) as they are pre- 
paring for the street. 

The girls are a clever pair and have hit 
upon a novel idea. Miss Lancton's high 
kicking, in the closing number, is deserving 
of special mention. 

Nat M. Wills has changed bis material 
considerably since this reviewer saw him 
last at the Palace, and has improved his act 
thereby. Practically every gag is sure-fire, 
and his comedy telegrams earn their usual 
quota of laughs. His singing at the end 
of the turn rather detracted from the act, 
and it would probably be wiser for him to 
ccnfine his act to monologue and telegrams. 
The Nightons Statues closed the show. 
Three men with good physiques do some 
classy posing, after which they perform gym- 
nastic feats with considerable skill. H. G. 



ROYAL 

After a Hearst-Patbe News Pictorial, 
Albert Donnelly opened the vaudeville show, 
billed as "the fellow who talks with his 
fingers." By that, it is meant that a 
screen is lowered and the house darkened 
except for a light near the screen, which 
enables him to produce shadow effects on 
the screen with his hands. 

The second spot was occupied by Van 
and the Ward Girls in "Classified Jazz," 
which they are pleased to style: "Not a 
band but a big noise." The act abounds 
in rough stuff, but the Royal audience liked 
Van's kidding with the girls, and laughed 
at everything the trio did. The ballad 
which closed the act started seriously 
enough and ended very cleverly, making a 
nice closer to an original turn. 

Julie Ring and Co. found the third 
spot only luke warm. In John Hymer's 
playlet, "Twice a Week," they experienced 
a little difficulty in getting all the humor- 
ous points of the playlet over successfully. 

The playlet takes place just 'outside of 
a cemetery gate. She has come to put 
flowers on her dead husband's grave ; be 
has come to pay respect to the memory of 
bis late wife. Due to the fact that the 
gate is locked and that the sexton is hav- 
ing a hard task finding the key to fit the 
broken lock, the pair find themselves fac- 
ing each other before the gate and start 
to chat the time away until the sexton 
finds the key. Tie culmination of the 
conversation is the discovery that their 
late better-halves had been untrue to them 

during life and bad, in fact, been each 
other's affinities. 

"The Race of Man," a scenic novelty 
depicting all races in song, followed. It 
has improved so greatly since its last re- 
view in the Clippee that it was hardly 
recognizable as the same offering. With 
the possible exception of the Indian, every 
change has been made for the better, until 
now the act is in tip-top shape and did 
the next thing to stopping the show at the 
Royal on Monday night- 

The headline curtain was pulled up on 
Clark and Hamilton, who closed the first 
half of the bill. This pair bad no difficulty 
In getting over for a big hit, and Clark's 
comedy delighted the audience. Miss Ham- 
ilton made a very charming appearance 
and only disappointed because she did not 

have more to do in the act. 

Clark's piano comedy becomes a trifle 
tiresome and would go over better if there 
were not so much of it. The gag about 
not even 'knowing King Henry VIII waa 
ill, is as old as King Henry himself and 
the quicker forgotten the better. 

The waiter in the act did all that was re- 
quired of him satisfactorily. 

The second half of the bill was opened 
by Leah Nora. This "happy smile girl" 
looked as happy and pretty as ever and 
went through her usual repertoire of songs. 
The man at the piano played two short 
solos. The first one has been played by 
too many pianists and was hardly done 
justice to by Lynn. The second selection 
was much better. The act went over well. 
It fell to J. Francis Dooley and Corinnr 
Soles, in "Will Yer Jim?' to stop the 
show. This clever duo seemed to be per- 
fectly at home at the Royal from the min- 
ute they first came on, and had the entire 
house with them throughout the act. 

Nevertheless, bits of business here and 
there seem reminiscent of other acts. The 
gag about whether she did wrong when 
she took a drink is being used by another 
act. The business of sitting down on the 
drop curtain steps is being used by Orth 
and Dooley. And the business of Dooley 
taking the audience into bis confidence 
about hia partner has been pulled off by 
several performers. If the team wish to re- 
main individual they should be more care- 
ful in the choice of their material and busi- 
ness, although, as a whole, it Is original. 

Dooley was forced to make a thank-you 
speech before the pair could bow off. 

The Great Mankichi and Co. closed the 
show and will be reviewed under New Acts. 

H. G. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



May 2, 1917 



AMERICAN 

The Meynards, two women, gave one of 
the best equilibristic acta seen hereabouts 
for some time. 

These women are among the few in their 
line appearing before the public. They open 
with head-to-head and hand-to-hand work 
which ranks with the very beat. After a 
good routine of this the nnderstander holds 
a twelve-foot perch on the top of which 
her partner does various stunts and winds 
op with a head-stand. As a finish, the 
smaller one makes a head-slide on a little 
affair on wheels on a twelve-foot slide held 
by her partner. 

The nnderstander is a big, strong woman 
and her partner is a remarkable gymnast. 
They present a showy act and scored a 
solid hit. 

Orben and Dixie, man and woman, offer 
an act made up of southern songs and 
dances. They open with a song and the 
woman follows with a coon-shouting num- 
ber. The man joins her and they break 
into a dance. They then do a rag song 
and dance and the man follows with a 
dance made up of the oddest steps imagin- 
able. 

For an encore they gave a dance on the 
levee in which they both step to the ac- 
companiment of a harmonica played by the 
woman and finish with her partner doing 
more eccentric steps. They make a good 
appearance, and are ace high as delineators 
of Southern darkey stuff. Their act met 
with pronounced success and was recalled 
four or five times. 

Mario and Trevette presented their ex- 
cellent singing act and came in for a full 
share of appreciation. They open with the 
"Misererie" from "II Trovatore." Miss 
Trevette then renders a popular song 
which she follows with an imitation of 
Anna Held singing one of her well-known 
songs. Sig. Mario then sings the Carrio 
song from "I Pagliacd" They then sing 
a duet and, for an encore, sing an old- 
time Italian song. They vocalise well and 
the approval accorded them was well de- 
served. 

Dave Tharsby does an excellent single 
comedy act. He renders four songs, 
evidently his own special numbers, which 
are away from the usual run and all have 
an irresistible comedy twist. He also has 
a lot of patter made for laughing purposes 
only. He had his audience with him from 
the start. Thursby is a very clever en- 
tertainer with a pleasing personality and 
would go in any company. He scored the 
comedy hit of the bill- 

"Oh ! You Devil" is the title of a sketch 
presented by Herman Becker, which em- 
ploys the services of two men and two 
women principals and six chorus girls. 
There are two sets used, the full stage one 
being a thing of beauty. The chorus does 
good work, but there is little else to recom- 
mend the act, which is in no way enhanced 
by the broad lines spoken by the black- 
face comedian and the man playing the 
DeviL 

After the intermission Gertie De Milt, 
"The Girl With the Smile," showed her 
wares, which brought her success. She 
sang three songs, which brought her favor 
and then gave a clog dance which pleased 
so well that she was forced to respond with 
an encore. For this she danced an Irish 
reel, in which she introduced a few High- 
land fling steps. 

Harry Stafford, assisted by a man and 
woman, presented a sketch called, "Money 
Talks." It tells of a newly married couple 
who have gone on their honeymoon with 
two or three dollars as their capital. They 
locate in a seaside hotel, which they dis- 
cover, belongs to the husband's father. They 
also discover that the hotel is about to be 
sold and the husband, by a clever ruse, 
gets an option on it and sells the option 
for $650. The sketch is cleverly con- 
structed on a good idea and is well played. 
It was wen liked. 

_ Joe Burns and Murry Kissen were a big 
hit in their offering. They are clever com- 
edians and have good material which they 
know how to put over. The audience liked 
this offering and applauded liberally. 

Richard WaUy. assisted by Mile. Jessica, 
presents a rather novel juggling act in 
which he juggles various articles, but his 
best work is done with billiard balls and 
cues. B. W. 



SHOW REVIEWS 

(Continued oo page u) 



FIFTH AVENUE 

Nothing seems to interfere with the at- 
tendance at this bouse, and the bills ar- 
ranged by Manager Quaid week after week, 
please the patrons. 

Scranton, Bell and Scranton, two men 
and a woman, presented a tight wire act 
that belongs up among the top-notchers. 
They do an exceptionally good routine, one 
or two of their stunts being away from 
those usually done by wire performers. 

One of their most attractive feats is a 
cake walk on the wire in which all three 
perform. Their finish is novel and daring. 
The shorter of the men and the woman 
each stand on a pedestal at either end of 
the wire and turn a rope while their part- 
ner does a rope-skipping stunt from the 
center. The applause accorded the act was 
hearty and well deserved. 

Jean De Lisle and Sara do a sister turn 

somewhat different from the usual ran. 
They start in the regulation soubrette dress 
singing a duet. Then follow a single by 
one of the team, with an Italian song. Her 
partner then appears as a Dutch emigrant 
girl and does a yodeling song and wooden 
shoe dance. They finished dressed as cow- 
girls, doing an appropriate song and dance 
and scored a hit. 

Gordon Eldrid and company, a man and 
three women, presented "Won by a Leg," 
which proved to be a well-written comedy 
sketch. The material is bright and well 
put together. 

It tells of a girl who, in order to learn 
whether a young man loves her or not, pre- 
tends to be dead. The young man returns 
after an absence of a month and, to test 
her love for him, pretends he lost a leg 
in a railroad accident The man did good 
work and his little company gave him good 
support. The skit opens in one and closes 
in full stage boxed scene, both special sets. 
The act went over in good shape. 

Charles Olcott in "A Comic Opera In 
Ten Minutes" scored one of the big hits 
of the bin. He does a travesty of comic 
opera which, while the idea Is not new, 
has a newness as he does it. He kept his 
audience laughing from start to finish and 
was liked so well that he was called on 
for an encore. 

Beyer's "Petticoat Minstrels," with good 
singing and dancing and a few minstrel 
jokes, came in for a good share of ap- 
proval. 

John and Mae Burke presented their 
skit, "A Rag Time Soldier," to good results. 
They open in one with a lot of good patter 
filled with laughs and then go to fuU stage 
with singing and burlesque piano playing. 
They finish in one and Burke shows what 
a capital pianist be is. Mrs. Burke sings 
several songs and is a good foil for the 
comedy of her husband. They met with 
pronounced success. 

The Three Bobs, in dosing position, held 
the audience. Dressed in tennis suit, busi- 
ness suit, and as a tramp, respectively, they 
presented a clever juggling act, using vari- 
ous clubs. Tbey have a weU trained buU 
terrier which does a number of clever 
stunts. The act scored a wen-earned hit. 

Mabel Burke was beard in a wen ren- 
dered Mustrated song and had to respond 
to an encore. 

The featu-e film was the last installment 
of the "Patria" picture, in which Mrs. Ver- 
non Castle starred. The closing scenes of 
this serial are sensational in the extreme, 
and show a battle on the Mexican border 
between the Mexicans and the force of 
Patria'a men which ends in a victory for 
the latter. 

The Hearst-Pathe' pictures presented 
many of the stirring current events per- 
taining to our entrance into the European 
war, showing scenes in various parts of 
the country. E. W. 



n 



JEFFERSON 



The Three Brittons offer a good routine 
of selections on musical instruments and 
were warmly received. The violinist, who, 
it was announced, had won a first prize 
in the Royal Conservatory of Belgium, 
pleased with his classical number. 

Delight, Stewart and Hardy aing a Uttle 
and dance fairly well. 

Bob Quigley and company in a sketch 
entitled "The Little House Under the HUL" 
got very few laughs with their slow mov- 
ing vehicle. The characters are Dish and, 
while the dialect is good, the comedy was 
not funny. The sketch seemed to run too 
long, so much so, in fact, as to prove un- 
interesting. 

Jack Strauss, a singing comedian, went 
over very big. His impersonations were 
especially liked, the imitation of a colored 
boy singing a coon song getting a big hand. 
He finished with a patriotic song that re- 
caned him. 

Lottie Williams and company touched the 
heart strings of the audience with their 
sketch entitled, "The Bowery CamiUe," and 
scored a big hit. The sketch is full of 
human interest, the unhappy ending mak- 
ing it vividly real. 

Ned, an artist, has befriended a poor 
girl, who becomes his model, and they fail 
in love with each other. Ned asks the 
girl to marry him and she, in ecstacies, 
promises. He goes out to buy some brushes 
and his mother, with whom he has fallen 
out because he has taken up art, comes 
to take ber son home. She persuades the 
girl to give him up, pointing out the differ- 
ence in their modes of life, and the girl 
makes the supreme sacrifice, not only giv- 
ing up ail hopes of happiness, but lying to 
Ned and making him believe she has loved 
him for the money she can extract from his 
parents. 

^ Mumford and Thompson brought forth a 
big response from the audience with their 
songs and patter. It must be stated that 
their songs claimed the biggest applause. 

The Aeroplane Girls closed the show with 
their, performance on flying trapeze. 

S. W. 



SAYS WAR NEEDS THEATRES 

PrrrSBUBGH, April 28. — The Rev. Dr. 
William Norman Guthrie, of New York, in 
addressing the delegates to the seventh 
annual convention of the Drama League 
of America here said that the theatre is 
needed In time of war to alleviate the 
horrors of the battlefield. 



CITY 

The Elvira Sisters opened the show with 
gymnastic dancing, each of their numbers 
being appreciated. 

Billy De Vere rendered several songs, but 
gained little applause. His impression of 
Bert Williams was best liked. 

"Fun on the Farm," Fred Afdath's old 
vehicle "Hiram on the Farm," could elicit 
but few laughs from the audience. 

Jack Rose, nut comedian, saalatsJ by 

Earl Le h m an at the piano, was a big hit, 
and left the audience calling for more. 
They like his style and delivery, aU his 
songs going over big. His comments to 
the audience got the laughs, and he kept 
the audience in continual good humor. 
Lehman rendered a selection on the piano 
and Rose came out and sang "Oh, Johnny," 
which had already been sung by De Vere, 
but judging by the applause they didn't 
mind that. 

May Elinore and Violet Carlton engaged 
in songs and patter, but found it hard to 
put them over. They were fairly wen re- 
ceived. 

Harry Smith and company captured the 
laughing hit of the Mil with their sketch 
entitled "The Alimony Dodger." The ac- 
tion takes place on board a steamer, where 
a newly .married couple are going on their 
honeymoon. 

A policeman has been killed in a raid 
on a gambling den and a man, who thinks 
he is responsible, is escaping on the steamer 
with his wife following him. Each thinks 
the other is a detective and the new bride 
thinks the other woman is her husband's 
first wife. 

Harry Ellis registered a hit with his ren- 
dition of songs, in which the spirits of 
composers, whose songs he ragged, haunt 
him 

The Fridkowsky Troupe of Russian sing- 
ers and dancers closed the show. There is 
too much sameness about their dancing, but 
they pleased. S. W. 



GIRLS FROM THE FOLLIES 
HAVE NEW CAST 

AT THE OLYMPIC 

For their return date at the Olympic, 
New York, this week, Strouse and Frank- 
lin have provided an entirely new list of 
principals and the show pleased a good- 
sized crowd on Monday afternoon. 

The runway over the orchestra seats was 
used to good advantage for quite a few 
numbers. 

Louise Wolfe and Sedal Bennett were 
well cast in their respective roles and 
numbers. 

Ella Tavoleto was a gingery soubrette 
with vim and vigor as well as looks and 
voice. 

Laura Branner was a shapely leader, 
who appeared to particularly good advan- 
tage in the "Soldiers of TJ. S. A." patriotic 
ensemble. 

A newcomer in burlesque, and one who 
win be heard from, is Fred Binder, who 
played the Hebrew role in clever style, in- 
troducing acrobatic work of novel nature. 

Al Bush was the German comedian, who 
aided effectively. Harry Van lived up to 
his reputation as character man and dancer 
and George Grennan also had several good 
assignments. 

"Cohen's Midnight Frolic" is the title 
of the burlesque which kept everybody 
hustling. "Romany," "Keep on Playing 
Ragtime," "Pretty Baby," "Island Sur- 
rounded by Girls," by Fred Binder and the 
girls ; "AU Aboard for Chinatown,'.' "Iowa," 
"Oriental Land" and a toe dance by Mile. 
Reece were among the successful numbers. 
The chorus includes Laura Branner, 
Anna Spears, Margaret Ferguson, Dorothy 
Minor, Gene Clayton, Kitty Allen, IsabeUe 
Savoy, Belle FenneU, Viola Spaeth, Flor- 
ence Whitford, Carrie FenneU, Doris Bran- 
don, Anna Belmont, Helen Gibson, Vivian 
Hart, Christie Walton and Irene Clark. 

MERRY ROUNDERS 
PLAY REPEAT 
AT THE COLUMBIA 

Because they were here earlier in - the 
season the Merry Rounders are a return 
attraction at the Columbia, New Tork, this 
week. 

Abe Reynolds and George F. Hayes are 
the comedians and they succeed in handing 
out many laughs. 

Eileen Sheridan is the leading lady, and 
her songs include several clever numbers, 
notably the variations of "Do As Tour 
Mother Did," which was caned for again 
and again. Incidentally. Miss Sheridan got 
busy for the Actors' Fund and collected 
?145.39 at the matinee. 

Eugene Macgregor, Frank Ward, Kath- 
erine Beyer, Elizabeth Jane, Addison 
Voting and Marie Lamar, Dorothy Earle, 
George Lehman, Jack Gobrecht and Sam 
Goodman completed the cast. 

The Record Four gave good musical 
selections, and the specialty by Macgregor 
and Miss Jane was also wen liked. 

"Hawaiian Butterfly," led by Miss Sheri- 
dan, was a big hit, and Frank Ward enter- 
tained with his novel specialty. "The Seven 
Ages of Dancing" was a dancing revue of 
unusual interest. 



McINTYRJE SUED BY SON'S WIFE 
Chicago, April 30. — Mrs. Louise Mc- 
Intyre, singing in vaudeville under the 
name of Louie Da ere, has filed suit for 
$50,000 against her parents-in-law, James 
Mclntyre, of the vaudevflle team of Mc- 
Intyre and Heath, and Mrs. Maude Mc- 
lntyre, charging alienation of the affectiona 
of their son, to whom she had been mar- 
ried six years. 



HAZLETON THEATRE BURNED 

Hazutton, Pa., April 29.— Fire de- 
stroyed the Palace Theatre early Thursday 
morning, causing a $100,000 loss in prop- 
erty and stage effects, and players' belong- 
ings to the value of $6,000. 

JANE COOPER IS PICKET 

Washhtoton, April 28. — Jane Cooper, 
a member of "Tne Music Master" company, 
which played the Belasco Theatre last 
week, was one of the suffrage pickets in 
front of the White House gates. 



May 2, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 




HUNT AND DE MANBY 



Theatre — Eighty-first Street. 

Style^— Singing. 

Time — Seventeen minutes. 

Setting— Special in two. 

Ida Brooks Hunt, at ope time prima 
donna of "The Chocolate Soldier," and 
Alfred de Manby, assisted by George 
Halperia at the piano, present a ciasBi- 
cal repertoire of songs. 

The entire repertoire of songs used by 
the couple, with the exception of "Com- 
ing Thro' the Rye," are well rendered. 
That number was rendered without much 
spirit. 

Halperia is probably one of the best 
piano accompanists with any vaudeville 
act Too little time, however, is allowed 
him in the act to display bis talents as 
a soloist. He has jnat one number. If 
Miss Hunt were to eliminate "Coming 
Thro' the Rye" and would allow Hal- 
perin to substitute a piano solo in its 
place tie value of the act would be ma- 
terially Increased. 

The rendition of "Come Back to 
Mandalay" by de Manby seemed to be 
taken by the audience as the best number 
of the act for he was re-called four times 
at the Wednesday afternoon performance. 
Taking the act, as it is at present con- 
strued, it is just .an acceptable turn for 
the two-a-day house. A. U. 



NEW 

(Continued 



ACTS 



23) 



1 



PROF. ALBERT NECKELSON N 

Theatre — Proctor'* Txcenty-thiri St. 

Style — Magic. 

Time — Fifteen minute*. 

Setting — Fun ttage tpeoiat 

Prof. Neckeisonn's material in this 
turn is that used by magicians and the 
entire routine is neatly executed. 

It consists of producing doves and 
rabbits from an empty bowl, sleight of 
hand work with playing cards, changing 
colors of flags, producing coins from the 
air and dropping them into a hat. This 
latter stunt is worked in the audience, 
with Neckelsonn extracting the coins 
from the hair and other' parts of persons 
in the audience. He also extracts candy 
and clocks from the empty hat. His con- 
cluding stunt is to produce mounted flags 
from two small strips of cloth. 

The act is a pleasing one and will find 
bookings readily. A. TJ. 

KANE AND HERMAN 

Theatre — Colonial. 

Style — Musical skit. 

Time — Ten minutes. 

Setting— Special. 

The act is done in one, the drop rep- 
resenting the skyline of New York as 
seen from Jersey, which is rather at- 
tractive. 

Eddie Kane and Jay Herman style 
their turn "A Ragtime Cocktail." 

The patter is only fair, both assum- 
ing souse roles. Here and there in the 
act are sprinkled several song numbers, 
sung passably, the one about the rag- 
time cocktail being by far the best. 

These boys spoil several of their gags 
by telling the audience too much. For 
instance, one fellow asks the other not 
to hold a match too near his nose be- 
cause his nose is full of alcohol. There 

is' the punch, but, instead of stopping, 
he goes on to say that it might explode. 

Another instance is as follows: 
(Kane) "I want to ask you a favor." 
(Herman) "How much do you want I" 
Again the punch has been delivered, but 
Herman goes on to ask his partner if 
he is financially embarrassed. 

These are but two instances of many, 
and if this team would carefully go over 
their act and give more study as to how 
and when to land the punch in each 
gag, they would be surprised to notice 
tiie difference in laughs they would re- 
ceive in response. 

As it stands, the act gets by. H. 0. 



THE SUFFRAGETTE REVIEW 

Theatre — Avenue, Chicago. 
Style— Musical Tabloid. 
Time— One hour, fifteen minutes. 
Setting— Special, full. 

This offering bears testimony to the 
fact that the producers made sure of 
their material as well as of the people 
interpreting it. 

However, good plot and comedy dia- 
logue are more than counterbalanced, in 
spots, by "melody de luxe." Flo Bert 
got tremendous applause when she in- 
terpolated two popular songs, forcing 
four male principals to check their dia- 
logue, while she responded to encores. 
She is easily the "big reason" with the 
show. 

Bobby Bernard comes in for his share 
of laughs in the role of the bogus baron, 
who is schooled by his bosom friend, 
Con Connors, to pose as the inventor 
of a love elixir which captivates the 
leader of the suffragettes and causes 
no end of mix-up. Gertrude Madge, as 
master of ceremonies, vies with Miss 
Bert for first honors, at times. 

James Guilfoyle makes an ideal 
"con" man. Walter Brazee and Jack 
Sparke received much applause through- 
out. 

Plots appertaining to "fake" noble- 
men, phoney princesses and love elixirs 
are always acceptable, when done in a 
new way. This presentation is a good 
example of the "new way." The action 
takes place on the roof-garden of a 
Metropolitan hotel. C. N. 



SAM BERNARD 

Theatre — Palace. 

Style — Comedian. 

Time — Eighteen minute*. 

Setting — In one. 

Sam Bernard returns to vaudeville 
with practically everything he used be- 
fore excepting a new finishing stunt. 
He opens with a line of talk in which 
he uses the leader of the orchestra to 
feed him his gags, and, at the opening, 
the leader inquires if Bernard speaks 
various foreign languages. When it 
gets down to the question whether Ber- 
nard, with his dialect, speaks German, 
Bernard replies "not lately." 

Bernard has the same way of deliv- 
ering his material, making his feet, In 
the form of slide steps, emphasize the 
points of his gaga. As a finishing stunt 
he announces he will endeavor to im- 
personate J. W. Wallack playing "Fagin, 
the Jew" in "Oliver Twist," an imper- 
sonation he has not done for twenty- 
five years. 

Being of the younger generation it 
made little difference to the writer as 
to how he read his lines, acted, or 
looked, but the fall at the finish Monday 
afternoon was great. S. L. H. 



THE GREAT M ANKICHI & CO. 

Theatre — Royal. 
Style — Japanete novelty. 
Time — Eleven minute*. 
Setting— Special. 

There are three Japanese in this act, 
two men and a woman. They work in 
a special Japanese setting in which a 
bright red color predominates. 

The first stunt is performed by Man- 
bichi. It consists of balancing a parasol 
in various ways, with his feet. It is 
almost identical to the opening stunt of 
the Five Kitamuras and, therefore, 
ceases to be a novelty to one who has 
seen the quintette, although Mankichi 
does some very skillful work. 

The second stunt also smacks of the 
Kitamuras. Much of the same business 
is used in balancing a barrel, with his 
feet. 

The last portion of the act is devoted 
to the balancing of metal tops, which 
eeern to spin at a great rate of speed. 
The last time these tops are spun they 
are thrown upwards, releasing from 
above a quantity of American flags so 
that the act ends in a grand hurrah. 
The turn is a very passable closer. 

H. G. 



LEWIS & FEIBER 

Theatre — A Romero. 

Style— Comedy Skit. 

Time — Thirteen minute*. 

Setting — In one and two. 

With enough of a story to sustain the 
interest, and with catchy musical num- 
bers interspersed, Mabelle Lewis and 
Jess Felber present their romantic 
comedy skit, entitled "Ye Motor Inn." 

The pair have a lot of fun kidding 
each other, he making her believe that be 
is an insurance adjuster after she has 
disclosed to him that ber broken auto- 
mobile, which cost $500, is insured for 
$2,000. She makes him believe that she 
is the daughter of the Judge after he has 
disclosed to her that he was exceeding 
the speed limit in the car. An a matter 
of fact they have both been fibbing, and 
the act ends with a clever song concern- 
ing the telling of white lies. 

Jess Feiber is a cracker-jack pianist 
nnd accompanies several songs excel- 
lently. The girl is an entertaining 
comedienne. H. G. 



HOWARD & CLARK REVUE 



Theatre — Palace. 
Style — Musical Revue. 
Time — Thirty-five minute*. 
Setting — Special. 

Joseph E. Howard and Ethlyn Clark 
have brought a two-dollar flash act to 
Broadway which vaudeville can well af- 
ford to welcome with open arms. 

The idea is a setting of four different 
scenes, all introduced by a comely look- 
ing young woman, who describes what 
is going to take place and who reads 
her lines splendidly. The settings, 
themselves, bespeak good taste and up- 
to-the-minute style. A corking good 
company of singers and dancers num- 
bering about thirty figure throughout 
the act. 

The opening scene gives Howard an 
opportunity to introduce the various 
characters at a country club, and he 
sings four songs, accompanied by a 
quartette and Miss Clark, at different 
times. 

The next introduces some colored peo- 
ple in a noiay demonstration of singing 
and dancing in a levee scene. This 
scene is splendidly handled and full of 
pep. 

The next shifts to Chinatown, and in- 
troduces several Chinese songs and Miss 
Clark in a Chinese number, in which 
she shows a beautiful Chinese costume. 
Howard here sings his "pipe" song with 
big results. 

The finish shows a lotus forest and 
introduces some splendid dialogue be- 
tween MJsa Clark and Howard, and alio 
a patriotic number, which gives the en- 
tire company a chance to show its full 
strength. It also brings out a cute love 
song between Miss Clark and Howard, 
which is further enhanced by a rain ef- 
fect in which two black-face comedians 
allow the water to wash off the burnt 
cork. 

The act is a speedy affair, splendidly 
dressed and set and done in a showman- 
like manner that deserves headline bill- 
ing everywhere. Howard, at last, has 
put over a big-sized winner. S. L. H. 



MOSS MUST PAY DAMAGES 

According to a decision banded down 
last week by the Appellate Division of the 
Supreme Court, B. S. Moss will have to 
pay Mrs. Minnie Stamp $500 damages for 
injuries received when Mme. Andre's lions 
stampeded in the Eighty-sixth Street The- 
atre, of which be .was owner and manager 
at the time. The woman claimed her 
knee was injured in the panic and sued 
for $5,000. She was awarded $500. At- 
torneys for B. C. Moss appealed the 
order, which was affirmed with costs. 



PANIC AVERTED BY MANAGER 

A panic was narrowly averted last Fri- 
day evening by William H. Quaid. man- 
ager of Proctor's Fifth Avenue Theatre, 
who discovered a blaze within thirty feet 
of his theatre and immediately turned in 
an alarm, ordering his stage crew to as-. 
sist, after assuring the audience that there 
was no danger. 

TERRY S QUIT FOR SEASON 

Bare, Pa., April 28. — Arthur and Grace 
Terry closed their season here to-day and 
to-morrow leave for their ranch near Roy- 
dale, Alberta, Canada. They will be seen 
next season with one of the leading bur- 
lesque shows. 

WESTERN HOUSES CLOSE IN MAY 

Chicago, HI., April 30. — With the 
week of May 14, the U. B. O. houses of 
the middle west will close their present 
season and remain dark throughout the 
summer. 



MAY AND BILLY EARL 

Theatre — Proctor'* Twenty-third St. 

Style — Singing and Talking. 

Time — Fourteen minute*. 

Setting— Street. 

The opening of the turn shows two 
people meeting on the street with a 
woman leading a mongrel dog by a leash. 
This is the foundation for a routine of 
talk about the animal, which possesses no 
exceptional quality so far as humor or 
wit are concerned. The "gags" used have 
seen service in vaudeville for a consider- 
able period. Neither does there appear 
to be anything original in the entire 
routine of business done by the couple. 

However, the talk ia presented in a 
neat manner, which sort of covers np the 
fact that it is "moss-covered." The 
woman possesses ability as a comedienne 
and if she had the proper material could 
do it a great deal more justice than she 
does the present routine of "gags." The 
turn in its present shape is just an ac- 
ceptable one for an early spot in the 
neighborhood theatres. A. C 



LOUIS MANN HAS NEW SKETCH 

Louis Mann will shortly be seen over 
the United Time in a new playlet en- 
titled "The Good for Nothing," written by 
Samuel Shipman. 



FRED SPEARE ON UNITED TIME 

Fred Speare, who has been playing the 
Loew Circuit in "Everyman's Sister," ia 
due to open on the United Time early this 
month at the Albhambra Theatre. 



BILLY DE VERE 

Theatre — Folly, Brooklyn. 
S^yle — Singing. 
Tiaia- — Ten minutes. 

Setting— In one. 

Billy De Vere is a singer of popular 
and character songs. His first number 
is a novelty. This is followed by a sing- 
ing impersonation of Bert Williams. An 
Irish song about McGinnigan is the third 
number of his repertoire, and a souse 
number concludes the turn. 

The Bert Williams interpretation ia 
too long and monotonous. Otherwise, 
the songs are sung in a manner that will 
please small time audiences. The Irish 
song is by far De Vere's best. H. G. 



10 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



May 2, 1917 



"HIS LTTTLE WIDOWS" 
A LAUGHING SUCCESS 
AT THE ASTOR 



"HIS LTWia WIDOWS."— A comedy 
with music Book and lyrics by Bid* 
Joooaon lomi and William Our 
Duncan. Mole by William Schroeder. 
Produced Monday ereuiut, April 3<rtb, 
at the Aster theatre. 
OAST. 

Jack Orareon Robert Emmett Kan 

"BUf" Hale HART Hats 

"Pete" Lloyd Cuter DeHaren 

(of the Arm of Lloyd. Grayeon * Bale. 
Broken) 

Hotel Manager Dwight Dana 

AMJeh Smith Frank Lalor 

Blanche Hale France* Cameron 

Barry Jotaon Charles Prince 

Sandy Barr — Joan Bobb 

LocLnda Lloyd Julia Ralph 

Anaabelle Lloyd Flora Parker 

Morula Uoyd Battle Bark* 

Offldatlne Ebbr Wallace Camp 

Lily Grace Haley 

Dahlia Bemlce Haley 

Tulip Loclle Haley 

Bose Mabel Haley 

Pansy Alma Plckard 

Mignonette Tlolette Strathmore 

H yaclnt be .LiDClle Zlntheo 

Narclaaus Irma von Nagy 

Gnarda Walter Rowley. Frank Youou 



The familiar criticism of musical com- 
edies and light operas that are devoid of 
plot, in no way applies to Rida Johnson 
Young and William Gary Duncan's new 

£ieco which came to the Astor Theatre on 
[onday night and immediately took Tank 
with the best musical pieces of the year. 
The story of "His little Widows," con- 
sistent and amusing to a marked degree, 
begins with the rise of the curtain and 
continues almost uninterruptedly until its 
fall, and is so good throughout that the 
music, melodious and musicianly as it is, 
becomes almost an incident in the de- 
velopment of the plot, instead of being, as 
in musical shows, the main feature, with 
the plot and dialogue merely thrown in 
to furnish pegs upon which to hang songs 
and dance numbers. 

Lloyd Grayson, "Betaoicumfwyp eard 
Lloyd, three young New York brokers who 
have been taking a flyer in copper, find 
themselves bankrupt, the news being 
brought to them in the midst of a gay 
party which they are giving at a fashion- 
able restaurant. They are endeavoring to 
find some way in which the bill for the 
night's festivities can be met when upon 
the scene arrives Abijah Smith, a Mor- 
mon, who informs "Pete" Lloyd of the 
death of his uncle in Salt Lake City. By 
the terms of the uncle's will "Fete" is left 
a fortune of $3,000,000, which he must 
go to Utah to collect. Without funds the 
three join a theatrical company and jour- 
ney to Salt Lake, there to discover that in 
order to obtain the fortune "Pete" must 
marry the widows of the uncle, who prac- 
ticed polygamy to the extent of leaving no 
less than eleven wives to mourn him. 

"Pete" refuses, but his two friends 
urge him on, promising that as soon as 
the marriage ceremony is performed and 
the money obtained they will call in a 
U. S. judge who will annul the marriage. 
While "Pete" is considering "Lloyd" and 
"BUT' are carrying on love affairs of their 
own with two charming maids they have 
met in Salt Lake City. They are planning 
an elopement when "Pete" finally agrees 
to marry the widows and get the fortune, 
and then they discover that the two girls 
are also widows of the uncle. "Pete" goes 
through with the marriage, and while 
waiting for the arrival of the judge who 
will annul the marriage learns to his cha- 
grin that the official left that night for 
New York. 

Robert Emmett Eeane and Harry Tighe, 
in the roles of "Pete's" friends, were ex- 
cellent, and Frank Lalor, as the Mormon 
Abijah, was most amusing. Flora Parker 
and Hattie Burks, as the two young Mor- 
mon widows, were excellent, while Frances 
Cameron sang most acceptably. 

The four Haley sisters in a clever spe- 
cialty scored one of the hits of the evening, 
ows" to success. 
WHAT THE DAILIES SAT 
Sun — Cheerful lit of musical fluff. 
Herald — Lively comedy. 
World — Jiot pretentious but active. 
Tribune— A sure enough comic opera plot. 
Times — In amusing (koto. 



NEW MIDNIGHT FROLIC OPENS 
The fifth of the Ziegfeld ''Midnight 
Frolics" had its first showing last Tues- 
day night, and proved to be amusing and 
tuneful. Among the entertainers were: 
William Bock and Frances White, Ann 
Pennington, Will Sogers, Nate Leipzig, 
Jack McGowan, Lillian Scarlett, Sybil 
Carmen, Dane Claudius and Mme. Bucille. 
New Weybnrn staged the production with 
efficiency and the handsome setting was 
by Joseph Urban. Gene Buck wrote the 
words and Dave Stamper the music 

WHITNEY TO REVIVE "JOHNNY" 

F. C. Whitney win revive the patriotic 
military opera "When Johnny Comes 
Marching Home," beginning May 7, at the 
New Amsterdam Theatre. In the cast 
will be Nannette Flack, Edward Basse, 
Juanita Fletcher, Nelson Riley, Julia Gif- 
ford, Maurice Darcy, FJsa Garrette, Percy 
Parsons, Bonnie Boyce, Wilbur Cox, Amy 
Torrians, George Tallman, Harrison Gar- 
ret and Roy Raymond. 



NEW DRAMA LEAGUE HEAD 

Ptttsbuboh, Pa., April 30. — 3. Howard 
Reber, of Philadelphia, Pa., has been 
elected president of the Drama League of 
America to take the place of Percivoi 
Chnbb, of St. Louis, Mo., resigned. Reber 
was selected at the convention of the 
League just held here. It was decided to 
change the national headquarters of the 
League from Chicago to Washington, D. 
C, and to make its future policy one of 
co-operation and not of centralization. 



HOUSE CHANCES POLICY 
Corning, N. Yj May 1.— The Opera 
House here managed by Leon Harris will 
inaugurate its summer season next Monday 
by installing musical tabloid in place of 
vaudeville, which has been the policy this 
season. Walter Plimmer will book the 
house. 



MANAGERS TO AID U. S. 

A monster benefit for the United States 
Marine Corps Recruiting Service, will be 
held under the auspices of the theatre 
managers of Greater New York at the 
Hippodrome on Sunday, May 20. A fea- 
ture of the affair will be an exhibition 
drill by a battalion of United States 
Marines. 



"THE EYES OF YOUTH" DATE SET 

"The Eyes of Yonth," by Charles Guer- 
non, will be given its first presentation on 
any stage by the Shuberts Friday, May 
11, at Stamford, Conn. Following a week 
in Newark, N. J., it will be brought to 
one of the Shubert theatres here. The 
play requires the use of a revolving stage. 

SHUBERTS ACQUIRE "THE PAWN" 

"The Pawn," in which Frank Keenan 
appeared a few weeks ago, has been ac- 
quired by the Shuberts, who will present 
it at Wilmington, Del., next Saturday 
night. A week in Pittsburgh. Pa., will 
follow and the play will then be brought 
to New York. 



MOROSCO TO STAR LEO CARR1LLO 
Leo Carrillo is to be starred by Oliver 
Morosco in a new play especially written 
for him by Frederic and Fanny Hutton 
entitled "Lombardi Ltd." It will be tried 
out in Los Angeles in June, and is due 
in New York in August. 

ITHACA HAS NEW THEATRE 

Ithaca, N. Y, April 26.— The New 
Strand Theatre here, which was dedicated 
Monday night, has a seating capacity of 
1,700. It opened as a motion picture 
house under the management of Wm. A. 
Dillon. 



"RIP" PRODUCED IN OPEN AIR 

San Dieoo, Cal., April 28. — An open 
air production of "Rip Van Winkle" was 
staged to-day at Del Mar in the new 
Nature Theatre. Thomas Jefferson played 
the part of "Rip," made famous by his 
father. 



CENTURY GETS TRIO OF STARS 

Charles B. Dillingham and Florenz 
Ziegfeld, Jr., have engaged a number of 
new stars for next season's new musical 
show, including Raymond Hitchcock, Lew 
Fields and Julian Eltinge. 



"CHARM BIRD" OPENING TONIGHT 

New Haven, Conn., May 2. — "The 
Charm Bird," a new play by Mrs. Justine 
Lewis, is scheduled to open here tonight 
under the management of John Craig and 
the Messrs. Shubert. Mary Young plays 
the only female role in the plsy. 



"COUNTRY COUSIN" A HIT 

'"The Country Cousin" has made such 
a success in Philadelphia that lilaw & Br- 
langer have booked it for next Fall in New 
York. It will probably come to the New 
Amsterdam. 



LEHMAN'S WIFE SEEKS DIVORCE 

Louis Thomas Lehman, an actor, is be- 
ing sued for absolute divorce by his wife, 
Mrs. Effie Mae Lehman, who charges her 
husband with having left her and married 
another woman without having first ob- 
tained a divorce. 



BLANCHE RING GOES WEST 

Blanche Ring and Charles Winninger 
left for Los Angel es la st Saturday to ne- 

S'n rehearsals in "What Next," the new 
orosco-Harris-Carroll musical comedy. 



"GHOSTS" NEXT BILL AT COMEDY 

Ibsen's "Ghosts" will be revived for one 
week, beginning May 7, by the Washing- 
ton Square Players at the Comedy The- 
atre as their fifth bill of the season. Mary 
Shaw will play the role of Mrs. Alving. 



"PAYS TO ADVERTISE" CLOSES 

"It Pays to Advertise" closed its sec- 
ond year last week at Harrisonburgh, Va., 
and the members of the company have re- 
turned to Broadway. 



NASH FOR "DEAREST FRIEND" 

George Nash has been engaged to play 
the leading role in "Her Dearest Friend," 
the Owen Davis comedy which Selwyn & 
Co. are to produce May 21 in Atlantic 
City. 



DE BRULER IS PROMOTED 
Macon, Ga., May 1. — R. H. De Bruler 
has been made general manager of the 
Capitol, Palace and Princess Theatres 
here. 



TRENTON THEATRE ENDS SEASON 

Trenton, N. J., April 28. — Pat White's 
Gaiety Girls Co. closed the burlesque sea- 
son at the Grand Theatre this city to-night. 



TO PRESENT "DOLLARS AND SENSE" 

"Dollars and Sense," elaborated from 
the vaudeville playlet of the same title, 
will have its first performance May 21. 
Alan Brooks, the author and producer, will 
also have the principal role. 

"WALUNGFORD" POSTPONED 

"Get-Rich-Quick Wallingford," scheduled 
to open last Monday at the Cohen Theatre, 
is laying off a week for further rehearsals 
and will open next Monday instead. 



KANE ORGANIZING TABS 

Bob Kane, of Manhattan Opera company 
fame, is organizing several tabloid com- 
panies for summer productions. 



DUNN REPLACES CAMERON 

Jimmy Dunn has replaced Hugh Cam- 
eron in Oliver Morosco's production of 
"Canary Cottage." 



SUMMER TAB. IN ROCHESTER 

Rochester, N. Y., April 28.— The Avon 
Theatre will have a musical comedy tab 
for the summer season beginning next 
week. 



"HIGHWAYMAN" TONIGHT 

"The Highwayman" is scheduled to 
open at the Forty-fourth Street Theatre" 
to-night. 



MOROSCO SIGNS VAUDEVHXIANS 

Oliver Morosco has engaged Flannigsn 
and Edwards for his new show, "What 
Next" 



HALL BUYS SITE FOR THEATRE 

Newark, N. J.— Frank J. Hall, 
head of the Strand Theatre and Civilisa- 
tion Film Corp., has purchased the Board 
Street property, formerly owned and oc- 
cupied by the Third Presbyterian Church, 
for $000,000 cash and plans to build a 
photoplay house, seating over 8,000 people 
at a cost of $350,000. 

The house will be named the Rialto and 
work will be started at once. 



TO CONTEST BRADY WILL 

Mrs. Mary E. McGee, who claims to be 
a daughter of the half-sister of the late 
James Buchanan Brady, through her at- 
torney, Frank B. Hippie, is taking legal 
action to break the decedent's will. If 
her relationship can be established, Hippie 
will contest the will, and Mrs. McGee will 
be in a position to receive a one-third 
share of the $4,000,000 estate. 



DORA LD IN A BESTS FISCHER 

Doraldina, who is being sued by Clif- 
ford O. Fischer for alleged violation of con- 
tract, has filed a counterclaim of $840, 
and throngh her attorney has applied for 
an order to compel Fischer to submit to an 
examination to determine his status as 
manager and agent. The order was granted 
and Fischer moved to have It set aside, bnt 
his application was denied. 



WOODS HAS "MARY'S ANKLE" 

A. H. Woods is preparing for a new 
production in spite of the season's lateness, 
and is engaging the company for "Mary's 
Ankle," an elaboration of a vaudeville 
sketch by May Tully. Among those so far 
engaged are Walter Jones, Irene Fenwick, 
Zelda Sears and John Cumberland. The 
play will have an early tryout. 



PEGGY ONEIL GUEST OF HONOR 

Buffalo, N. Y., April 80. — Peggy 
0*Neil was guest of honor last night at 
the Press Club entertainment at the Ma- 
jectic Theatre. She gave parts from the 
first and second acts of "Peg o' My 
Heart," assisted by Henry Stamford, who 
took the leading man's part in the play. 

GIRLS TO INVADE WALL ST. 

Wall Street is to he invaded by the 
Follies and Cocoanut Grove beauties on 
May 10, when they will make an auto- 
mobile tour of the financial district sell- 
ing admission tickets to the Actors' Fund 
Fair, which opens at the Grand Central 
Palace May 12. 



WHITE RAT WINS APPEAL 

William Drier, a vaudeville performer, 
who was arrested March 20 last, charged 
with disorderly conduct, which grew out 
of the White Rats actors' strike, will not 
have to serve his sentence in jail, as the 
decision of the City Magistrate has been 
reversed. 



TO CONTEST HAYMAN WILL 

Through her attorneys, Mrs. Grace A. 
Seymour last Saturday began proceedings 
to set aside the will of the late Al Hay- 
man on the ground of undue influence. 
Mrs. Seymour, who is bequeathed $10,000 
by the will, was a niece of the testator. 

TWO SHOWS FOR GROVE 

It is planned to give two entirely dif- 
ferent shows at the Cocoanut Grove, in- 
stead of repeating the same performance 
at D o'clock and ll.no. This arrangement 
will not go into effect, however, before 
June 1. 



PEDRO DE CORDOBA MARRIES 

Pedro de Cordoba, the actor, was mar- 
ried Sunday to Antoinette Glover, of Louis- 
ville, Kentucky, in the Lady Chapel of 
St. Paul's Cathedral. 



WILSON WITH UNIVERSAL 

Jerome N. Wilson has been added to the 
publicity department of the Universal 
Film Manufacturing Co. as assistant to 
Edward Mullen. 



BOY BORN TO SMITHS 

An eleven-pound baby boy was born to 
Mr. and Mrs. Willie Smith April 22. • 



May 2, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



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NEW YORK, MAY 2, 1917 

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rime Work* Wonder* 

Time works wonders! It broadens our 
views and softens our hearts and lets us 
see through different eyes. But while it 
does this does it also lower our standard 
of morality T 

A little more than a decade ago, in 1005, 
to be exact, there was produced at the 
Garrick Theatre in this city, a play that 
caused such a storm of protest from the 
press that it was closed by the city au- 
thorities after one performance. This 
work was "Mrs. Warren's Profession," a 
work in whieh the author, George Bernard 
Shaw, attempted to teach a lesson 
through the medium of the great social 
problem. 

The advance publicity given it worked 
morbid curiosity up to that point that 
the speculators sold tickets for $5 and $10 
apiece and in several instances $50 was 
offered for a single seat. 

It was at that time considered the moat 
salacious stage work New York had seen 
and its very name was tabooed in polite 
society. The man more venturesome than 
his fellows who spoke of it did so in a 
subdued voice. Those who saw its single 
performance spoke of their having gone in 
the interest of social welfare and for days 
it was the topic of editorials in the daily 
press. It also served as the text of many 
a sermon, and the editor and minister 
concurred that the play spelled the de- 
cadence of our stage. 

A few years later the announcement of 
its revival at the Manhattan Theatre 
created a little newspaper talk, but only 
that stylo of talk which is engineered by 
the publicity promoter. It was presented 
with the full permission of the police. 
The papers on the following morning 
passed it up with little space and no 
comment, simply referring to it as a re- 
vival. It was withdrawn after a few per- 
formances because of lack of attendance. 

A few days ago it was again revived. 
This time by Mary Shaw, and so little in- 
terest did it arouse that few were even 
aware that it was to be done and, follow- 
ing the performances, just as few knew 
it had been given, for the papers either 
ignored it entirely or announced the event 
in two or three lines. 

"Mrs. Warren's Profession" was never 
a play. It was a treatise, but, as a 
treatise, If H were unfit for presentation 
twelve short years ago, it is unfit today. 
Or, if it is fit today it was fit twelve 
years ago. 



Answers to Queries 

W. W.— Fiddler and Shelton were in the 
height of their popularity in 1011. 

• * • 

B. T. F.— "Are You a Crook t" was pre- 
sented at the Longacre Theatre, not at the 
Aator, as you say. 

• • • 

E. G.— Yes, "H. M S. Pinafore" was 
given a very elaborate revival at the New 
York Hippodrome. 

• * * 

T. G. W. — It is generally conceded that 
Charlotte Cushman heads the list of great 
native American actresses. 

• • • 

R. T. R. — George M. Cohan wrote 
words and music of several pieces, among 
which was "Little Johnny Jones." 

• • * 

A. W. D., Battle Creek.— D wins. "Under 
Many Flags" was the attraction at the 
New York Hippodrome season of 1012-13. 

• • • 

L. R. T., Ozone Park. — Helene Mora is 
dead. She sang the song to which you 
refer. Bessie Bonehill sang the same 
song. 

• • • 

N. R. O., Yonkers. — "Wiaow by Proxy" 
was presented by May Irwin with herself 
in tbe title role. It was not much of a 
success. 

• a • 

D. L. D., FJmira. — Henry B. Harris and 
Jesse L. Lasky'e Folies Bergere was open 
during the summer of 1911. The venture 
was not successful. 

• • • 

B. D. M. — Nance 0*Neil was never under 
McKee Rankin's direction after she ap- 
peared in "The Lily" under David Bel- 
asco's management. 

• • • 

I, R. D. — You are right — the Bobby 
North who appeared in "Just a Wife" and 
the Bobby North well known in burlesque 
are one and the same. 

• • • 

H. T. J. — Julian Eltinge made his first 
appearance as an amateur in one of the 
Bank Clerks productions. He was famous 
on tbe vaudeville stage before be appeared 
in a play. 

• • • 

T. T. L.— "The Littlest Rebel" was pro- 
duced by A. H. Woods. It was given at 
the Liberty Theatre. "Gypsy Love," an- 
other Wood's production was presented at 
tbe Globe Theatre. 

• • • 

K. K., Alton.— "Bunty Pulls the 
Strings" was at William Collier's Com- 
edy Theatre (now the Comedy). "A But- 
terfly on the Wheel" held forth at tbe 
Thirty-ninth Street. 

• • • 

E. P. P. — There is no way in which the 
work of Edwin Booth can be compared 
with that of any actor living today. Such 
comparisons can only be made between 
contemporaneous actors. 

• • • 

A. A. B.. Bronx. — You have the date 
right, but not the year. "The Prisoner of 
Zenda" was first shown as a motion pic- 
ture Tuesday afternoon, February 18, 
1013, at the Lyceum Theatre. 



TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO 

T. K. Burk'a show opened at Covington, 
Ky. 

Bob Slavin was tendered a benefit at 
San Francisco. 

Joseph Jefferson opened the Actor's 
Fund Fair at Madison Square Garden, 
New York. 

New plays: "The Check Book"; "The 
Stolen Sabre"; "The Golden Ladder"; 
"•Imagination." 

Scribner and Smith's All New United 
Shows opened at Youngstown, Sam A. 
Scribner, manager; Neil Smith, treasurer; 
J. R. Tucker, agent; E. C. Abbey, side 
show. 

Gilmore's New Central Theatre, Phila- 
delphia, was ' burned. Thomas LoreHa. 
Flora LoreBa. V.' Ch'eltenV Fanchon' Con- 
gers, Wm. L. Brooks, Sarah Goldman were 
burned to death. 



CAMPBELL BOYCOTT WRONG 

Editor, New York Cuffxu: 

Dear Sir: I want to call your attention 
to an injustice that is being done Elmer 
Campbell, proprietor of the Regent Hotel, 
St. Louis, on account of the fact of his 
trying to collect a debt for room and 
board from George W. Seargeant, repre- 
sentative of the White Rats Actors' Union 
in St. Louis. 

Seargeant, in return, is trying to boy- 
cott Mr. Campbell's Hotel Regent. 

Now, Mr. Campbell has no fight with 
any act or any actors' association, and 
why this would-be dictator should be per- 
mitted to wreak his vengeance upon Mr. 
Campbell, is beyond any sane man's con- 
ception. 

Under the circumstances, I think it only 
justice to Mr. Campbell and his hotel to 
state that he has at all times been the 
friend of the actor and has helped very 
materially many performers who required 
help at odd times. His reputation is be- 
yond reproach. He has always run a first 
class hotel and is a gentleman of repute. 

Is there not some way of advising the 
profession that the present boycott is 
nothing more or less than the outcome of 
a business dispute and should not be rec- 
ognized by the profession at large! 

Very respectfully yours, 
Kerry O. Meaoher. 

Chicago, 111., April 28. 

WANTS STANDARD CURTAIN TIME 

Editor, New York Cupper: 

Dear Sir: I have been wondering why 
it is that the theatres of New York can- 
not have some standard time for starting 
performances. As matters now stand, 
performances are likely to begin any- 
where from 7:45 to 8:45 and, unless one 
makes it a point to ask what time the 
curtain will rise, he is likely to arrive at 
8:45 and find that the curtain has been 
up an hour, or arrive at 7:45 and find 
that he has an hour to kill. 

The Alhambra is a case in point. I 
went there one night a couple of months 
ago, arriving at 8:15 and found that the 
s&ow had started a half hour before. So, 
next time, I got there at 7:45 and found 
out that the show did not start until 
8:05. 

Very truly yours, 
George Tmarp. 

New York City. 

WANTS FLAG REVERED 

Editor, New York Clipper: 

Dear Sir: I am a performer of several 
years' standing, in fact I hove two chil- 
dren on the stage, and have little to com- 
plain of, for I have always had plenty of 
work and by being provident and putting 
something aside for a rainy day, I have 
a competence. The United States, of 
which, I am proud to say, I am a citi- 
zen, has been good to me since I have 
been under the protection of the "Stars 
and Stripes," and I honor tbe Flag of my 
country above everything. It therefore 
grieves me to see the Flag used for ad- 
vertising purposes by some of bur thea- 
tres. 

The Stars and Stripes on a flag pole 
from the roof of a theatre, or from a 
window is a patriotic display, but a rep- 
resentation of it in illuminated electric 
lights over the entrance of a theatre does 
not, in my opinion, come under this head, 
hut is more in tbe nature of an adver- 
tisement. 

'• A Performer. 



rialto rattles 



LUBOWSKA BOOKING HERSELF 

Editor, NEW York Clipper: 

April 23, 1017. 

Dear Sir— Will you kindly publish the 
following announcement for me? 

Mile. Lubowska begs to announce that 
she is no longer under the management of 
Carl E. Carlton, and that she is no farther 
connected -with Lnbowska, Inc., and is not 
responsible for any bills or business done 
under that name. 

Neither Carl E. Carlton or John Bar- 
rington have any authority to negotiate 
or book me or my act. 

An further business can be done with 
me direct or through any other agents or 
rdanagers. 

Thanking you, I am gratefully yours, 
Dehkkek Lubowska. 



RHYMED nrTERVTBW NO. 0. 

Listen, my children, and you shall hear 
of a theatrical lawyer's checkered career. 
Henry Saks Hechheimer is now an attor- 
ney who reached his place by a very long 
journey. Look at him now with his specs 
on his nose and his lawyerlike, know-so- 
much, dignified pose and then try to pic- 
ture him in davya now gone bye, the hero 
of evtrf young college girl's eye, when, aa 
a runner, he won victory and fame as the 
winner of many an athletic game. Then, 
having ambitions to try acting art, he got 
on the stage with a very small part, but. 
after appearing in this and that role, he 
found he aspired to a much higher goal, 
so he got his degree to practice at law, 
and now he's the beat actor you ever saw 1 



A SONG THEY ALL PLAY. 

John Murphy, the theatrical clerk of 
the Hotel Normandie, has been frequent- 
ing the theatres lately, and, upon return- 
ing from a show the other night, inquired 
of a friend whether or not the orchestras 
were being tipped for plugging the "Star 
Spangled Banner" because, since war has 
been declared, be notices that they are 
playing it at all the theatres. 

ROLLING STONES THAT PAID. 

A refutation of the axiom that "rolling 
atones gather no moss" is found in the 
fact that Clark Ross, who had "Rolling 
Stones" on the road last season, now sees 
a way clear to become a partner in a new 
dramatic agency. If it didn't gather 
moss, it surely gathered quite a little 
long green. 



A MASCULINE POINT OF VIEW . 

In the pictorial section of one of tho 
Sunday papers, there appeared a picture 
of Kitty Gordon wearing what was de- 
scribed as a "beige satin frock clouded in 
black tulle showered with gold paflette.'." 
She looked stunning, nevertheless. 

— — — *i 

ANSWERS TO QUERIES. 

B. K "Chic" Sale did not get his nick- 
name from chasing chickens. 

R. P.— Nat Wills is the handsomest 
man on the vaudeville stage today. 

H. K. — You do not mean Nellie Jitney. 
You mean Nellie Nichols. 



NEWS THEY NEVER PRINT. 

The Shoestring Moving Picture Com- 
pany wag incorporated last week with a 
cspital stock of $2,000,000 which tlicy 
wish they had. They hope to get enough 
suckers to subscribe to stock to pay the 
officers' salsrles. 

ONLY THE NAME IS FAST. 

Those ,who pass along Forty-eighth 
Street and see the sign, ''Rush Theatre" 
will be surprised to know that It has been 
in the course of construction for more 
than a year and a half. 

■ I*-; 

IN PERFECT FORM. 

Harry Steinfeld, the theatrical lawyer, 
after visiting the Hippodrome the other 
night, said that everyone should see 
Annette KeHerman, merely as a matter 
of form. 



A NEW PROCEDURE. 

When Edward Peple's new play is pro- 
duced in June, conditions will be re- 
versed, for once. For then, "The Jury" 
will be on trial. 



LETS HOPE NOT. 

When Hazzard Short starts his vaude- 
ville tour with a sketch by Robert Baron, 
wc hope that the tour will not he short 
and barren. 



WE WONDER. 

Sam Bernard is playing at the Palace. 
At 2.35 the other afternoon he was seen 
talkine to Marcus Loew in front of the 
theatre. 



MARIE, SWEET MARIE. 

Dainty Marie is to ap pear in a new 
Morosco play entitled. "The Clinging 
Vine." Query: Is she to have the title 
relet 



12 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



Maty 2, 1917 



LONDON 



PARIS 




varM 




BERLIN 



SYDNEY 



St 



LONDON AT A GLANCE 



LONDON, Eng., April 21. 
Harry Bay ia in town next week. 

Harpe and Harper were in Devonshire 
this week. 



Cooper and Balnea are in Warminster 
next week. 



The two Tomboys are doing well on the 
Mom Tour. 



Mabel' Percival closes to-night a fort- 
night at the Palladium. 

Phyllis and Giles opens at the Lyric, 
Liverpool, next Monday. 

Daisy Griff cloaea to-night a good week 
at the Empire, Grantham. 

Betancourt goes to the Grand, Clap- 
ham, a week from next Monday. 

The Kenna Brothers report good busi- 
with their show in the provinces. 



John Humphries has signed a contract 
with Alfred Butt to appear in revue. 

The Londonderry Opera House is now 
under the management of Barney Arm- 
strong. 

Sonia Shields was this week at the Pa- 
vilion, Glasgow, and plays North Shields 
next week. 



George Mozart will shortly present a 
new burlesque written for him by Chris 
Davis. 



Linden and Berridge, at the Royal, 

Edinburgh, this week, goes to the Electric 
Theatre, Falkirk, next week. 

The Hackett Quintette plays the Elec- 
tric Theatre, Falkirk, next week, and the 
Louvre, Parkhead, the week following. 

Young Ted Granville, according to re- 
port, has again been wounded. This time 
it was in action in Mesopotamia. 

Miss Leslie Elliott has booked up with 
Oswald St oil and the V. T. a until 1921, 
and with the L. T. V. until 1920. 

Vernon Watson has a new sketch, en- 
titled "The Bill Poster's Dream," In which 
he and his wife will goon appear. 



Daisy Dormer has recovered from the 
effects of her recent auto accident, in 
which she escaped with cuts and bruises. 

Harry Randall has joined the ranks of 
revue writers, having just completed one 
which is to have an early production. 
It has not been named as yet. 

The libel action brought by Oswald Stoll 
and the Alhambra Company, Ltd., against 
General Smith-Dorrien, has been disposed 
of, but the terms of the settlement have 
not all been disclosed. 



James W. Tate has added Arthur Ander- 
son to his office force. 



"Tin Gods," Carlton Brough's new act, 
is soon to be seen in town. 



The Grahams, in their new humanMar- 
ionette act, are now on the L. T. V. tour. 



Carter Livesy will revive his old-time 
success "The Would-Be Actors." 



Oiga Torby, the Russian prima donna, 
is booked for the London Theatres tour. 



The Coliseum, Shoreham, has not closed, 
all reports to the contrary notwithstand- 
ing. 



Harry M. Vernon's famous sketch, "The 
Case of Johnny Walker," la to be elabo- 
rated and pictnrixed into a five-reel film. 

"Down Texas Way" is the title of a 
new revue • that has been completed by 
R. Horsley and Foster Howard. 

The annual Shakespearean festival at 
the RoyaL Portsmouth, will be held for 
the two weeks beginning May 7. 

Fred Macree, chief engineer of the Stoll 
Theatre, has joined the colors in the elec- 
trical plant of one of the munition centres. 



George Formby, the comedian, has been 
ordered by the Court to pay the South- 
port-Palladium, Ltd., £ 175 for breach of 
contract. 

The West End Pier Pavilion, MoTe- 
cambe, which was recently destroyed by 
fire, was opened twenty-one years ago this 
month. 



Bruce Green has been elected chair- 
man of the Variety Artists' Benevolent 
Fund and Institution for the ensuing 
year. 



The Shaftesbury Theatre, London, has 
been sold by the trustees of the Lancaster 
estate to Joseph Benson, of Liverpool, for 
£70,000. 



H. B. Irving will revive "The Bells" at 
the Savoy Theatre to-morrow night, 
especially for soldiers and sailors. No 
civilians will be admitted. 



The Two Rascal j and Jess Jacobson are 
back from South Africa. The trip took 
thirty-two days instead of the usual 
seventeen or eighteen. 



For more than seven months at the 
Argyle Theatre. Birkenhead, there has 
been given a full performance one after- 
noon each week for the wounded soldiers. 



"Damaged Gooda" is to go on tour. 

Dora Lyric is oh the L. T. V. Tour. 

"Some" ended its run at the Vaudeville 
last Saturday. 



Malcolm Scott baa been-entrajred to pln.v 
the role of Emerald Bing, in "The Bing 
Girls Are There." at the Alhambra. He 
succeeds Wilkie Bard, who has been 
ordered to take a rest. 



It seems to he the general impression 
that the revue business is likely to be 
overdone, if it has not already reached 
that stage. And is H any wonder, with 
ten in London and seventy-odd in the 
provinces T 

Mary Anderson is to appear to-night at 
the Coliseum in "Pygmalion and Galatea," 
in which she will play her old role of 
Galatea, one of the successes of her early 
stage career. The cast will include Lady 
Tree, BaaQ Gill, Norman V. Norman, 
Lyall Swete and John Anderson, the son 
of the distinguished astreaa. 



Florrie Gallimore plays the Palace, 
Salisbury, next week. 

Roxy La Rocca was this week at the 
Empire, New Cross. 

The Campbells were this week at the 
Hippodrome, Belfast. 

Wal Langtry is booked on the Moss 
Empire's Tour tin 1926. 

"The Toreador" opens this week at 
Folkestone, a twice nightly tour. 

Edith Cole has completed a new play 
which is promised an early production. 

Billy Housini and company close to- 
night a good week at the Empire, Dublin. 



WAR POSTPONES STARRING TOUR 

London, Eng., April 26. — The produc- 
tion of "The Tick Tack Man," the musical 
comedy in which Daly and Healy are to 
star on the Moss Empire Tour, has beea 
postponed, owing to present restrictions 
on skilled labor and facilities. Meanwhile. 
Daly and Healy will continue to present 
their comedy dancing act. 

WILL SUCCEED "SEE-SAW" 

London, Eng., April 25. — "Nothing 
New" has been decided as the revue which 
is to succeed "see-saw" at the Comedy, and 
is now rehearsing. The cast includes 
Arthur Playfair, Ixia Hoey, Teddie Gerard, 
Betty Ward, Joan Morgan, Phyllis Monk- 
man, Jack Hulbert and Hngh Wright. 



Leslie Elliott, "the girl at the piano," 
is booked on the Controlling Tour till 1921. 

Arthur Helmore has introduced into his 
sketch "At Home" a dissertation on "Food- 
leas Eating." 



Stephen T. Ewart has returned to Eng- 
land after an absence of nearly three 
years in South Africa. 

Angel Blanco, the Spanish violinist, 
opens next Monday at the Queens The- 
atre, Castleford. 



The Dugardes. who have just returned 
from South Africa, are booked with the 
London Syndicate Halls. 



H. B. Irving has offered his services 
"for what they may be worth" to the 
Director-General of National Service. 



Herbert Ralph, acting manager of the 
Princess. Portsmouth, has been appointed 
acting manager of the Royal, same city. 

George Norman, who recently played 
the leading comedy role in the "Wait and 
Sec" revue, has joined the Flying Corps. 

The old Princess Theatre, in Oxford 
Street, win be opened as a twice-nightly 
music haH after the war, if present plans 
are carried out. 



Georee Miller, who is to present the 
Inte Fred Kinney's sketches, hns been en- 
gaged by John Hart, for the nantnmime 
at the Princess. Brixton, next Christmas. 



The Harrison Frewin Opera Co. began 
n two weeks' season at the Royal. Bir- 
kenhead, lart Monday. On April 30th the 
company begins at Swansea a long tour. 



By arrangement with Andre Chariot, 
Phyllis Monkman will continue to appear 
in 'the haUet entitled "A Deserted Gar- 
den." a feature of "Hanky Panky," Ernest 
C. Rolls* offering at the Empire. 

"The Jew," by Richard Cumberland, a 
playwright of the eighteenth century, win 
be revived on May 8th at the Strand The- 
atre, for the benefit of the Russian Jewish 
war sufferers. The play was originally ' 
produced in 1794 at Drury Lane, but 
has not been acted since 1831, when 
Elliaton, shortly before his death, appeared 
in U. 



In some of the large industrial towns 
of the Midlands, where the munition 
works make a preat demand upon the elec- 
tric sunoly. the curtailing of the current 
for use in theatres is being considered. 

The House of Commons has decided that 
the hody of persons calling themselves 
the Cinema Commission have no official 
authority, and that all license matters are 
dealt with by local licensing authorities. 



MANAGERS' PROFITS INCREASED 

London, Eng., April 28. — He managers 
of the nineteen West-End theatres which 
applied for an increase of percentage of 
profits, based on the production and run- 
ning cost of plays, have been granted aa 
increase to 15 per cent, by the Commission- 
ers of Inland Revenue. 



A brass tablet announcing the establish- 
ment of a memorial cot, was unveiled re- 
cently at Hereford General Hospital. The 
cot is in memory of the eieht little girls 
who lost their lives in the Garrick Theatre 
fire. 



LONDON TO SEE "IBBETSON" 
London, Eng., April 30.— Negotiations 
have been completed whereby "Peter 
Ibbetson" is to be revived for a Londoa 
run. It has only been presented here at a 
charity matinee before the war. 

"LONGLEGS" SUCCESSOR CHOSEN 

London, Eng., April 26. — "Come out of 
the Kitchen," which has enjoyed such a 
long New York run, is to follow "Daddy 
Longlegs" at the Duke of York's Theatre 
in the FaU. Gilbert Miller win prepare 
the production during the Summer. 

McKTNNELL AGAIN FOR AMERICA 

London, Eng„ April 27. — When "Gen- 
eral Post," the latest London success, is 
seen in America, there is every likelihood 
, that the company now playing it, includ- 
ing Norman McKinnell, will be taken 
over to present it. 

"DUTCH" NEGOTIATIONS ARE OFF 

London, Eng., April 28.— The tentative 
negotiations for an American presenta- 
tion of "Double Dutch," begun before its 
premiere here, have been called off and it 
is not likely the piece will be taken to 
New York. 



OVATION TO "OUR MARY" 

LONDON. Eng., April 30— Mary Ander- 
son was greeted with an ovation on her 
entrance last night at the Coliseum as 
Galatea, in "Pygmalion and Galatea." 
Lady Tree and others in the cast were also 
heartily received. 



NEW PLAYS FOR LONDON 

London, Eng., April 26.— Contracts 
have been signed for two more American 
successes and "Oh, Boy" and "The Tailor- 
made Man" are soon to be seen on the 
London stage. 



LONDON TO SEE VEILLE D'ARMES 

London, Eng., April 26.— Charles B. 
Cochran has secured the English and 
American rights to "La Veille d'Armes." 
a recent success in Paris, and wni soon 
present an English version in London. 

SAR^S FOR JAPAN MAY 9 

HONOLtrru, April 27. — T. Daniel Fraw- 
ley, -who is bound on a world's tour with 
his dramatic company, wfll sail from here 
for Japan on May 9. 



"BEAUCAIRE" WITH MUSIC 

London, Eng., April 28.— He musical 
version of "Monsieur Beaucaire," which 
is being prepared by Gilbert Miller, wffl 
soon have a London showing. 



May 2, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



13 




BRYANT CO. TO 

PLAY SUMMER 

PARK 

WILL OPEN AT LAKEMONT IN JUNE 



Ukqiokt, Pa., April 28. — The Mar- 
guerite Bryant Players, who have jngt 
closed an engagement at the Empire The- 
atre, Pittsburgh, will play a Summer en- 
gagement at Lakemont Park this season. 

The company opens to-night in Youngs- 
town, where it will play for six weeks, 
previous to company here. 

They will open here the first week in 
Jane and the players will include Marguer- 
ite Bryant, leading lady ; Frederick Cole- 
grove, leading man ; Charles Kramer, come- 
dian ; William Lemuel, heavy ; P. W. Wag- 
ner, director; Katbryne McHugh, char- 
acters ; Florence Arlington, second woman ; 
Matt McHugh, second man ; Perry Nor- 
man, character; H. Hudgings, scenic ar- 
tist, and Baby Princess, child parts. 

N. Hedge Holmes and Charles Kramer 
were in this city last week making ar- 
rangements for the appearance of the com- 
pany. The opening attraction has not yet 
been decided, but the company has an 
extended repertoire which it will present 
during its run here. 

MOZART PLAYERS CLOSING 

Elmira, N. Y„ May 1. — Wee and 
Reilly's Mozart Players will close their 
season of thirty-five weeks Saturday, offer- 
ing a hew play, as yet unnamed. The 
company will return Labor Day. 

JACKSON JOINS ROBINS CO. 

Newark, N. Y., April 28.— Thomas E. 
Jackson will conclude his engagement with 
"The Yellow Jacket" here tonight and 
will join the Edward Robins Players, 
opening in Toronto Monday. 

MISS MOORE GOES TO DENVER 

Denver, April 27. — Clara Louise Moore, 
until recently with "His Majesty, Bunker 
Bean," has joined the O. D. Woodward 
Stock Co., opening at the Denham Theatre 
next Sunday. 

A LICE FLEMING SUED 

Portland, Ore., April 28.— C. V. 
Everett, of this city, has brought suit for 
absolute divorce against Alice Fleming, 
now leading woman with the Jay Packard 
Stock Co., of Newark, N. J. 

BERT LEIGH MARRIES 

Ocala, Fla., April 28. — Bert Leigh, man- 
ager of the Hazele Burgess Players, ap- 
pearing at the Tampa Theatre, Tampa, 
was married recently to Virginia Sistrunk, 
at the home of the bride's parents, in this 
city. 



GETS PRODUCTION PART 

Washington, April 30. — Helen Hayes 
Brown has retired from the cast of the 
Poll Players, having 'signed a contract with 
the Selwyns to appear in the Madge Ken- 
nedy role in "Fair and Warmer." 

GEORGIA HARVEY FOR STOCK 

Georgia Harvey, having closed the sea- 
son with "Very Good Eddie," will go to 
Providence, B. I., next week to open in 
musical stock at the Providence Opera 
House. 



MISS MORELAND IN PORTLAND 

Portland, Me, April 28. — Beatrice 
Moreland joined the Sidney Toler Stock 
Co. Monday, opening in "The Girl from 
Out Yonder. 



NEW HAVEN CO. OPENS 

New Haven, Conn., April 30. — The 
dramatic stock company at the Hyperion 
Theatre closed its season Saturday night 
and the Hyperion Musical Players will 
open tonight presenting "The Spring Maid." 
The company will be headed by Venita 
Fitzhngh, as prima donna and the prin- 
cipals will include: Henry Antrim, tenor; 
Edward Basse, baritone; Harry Short, 
comedy roles ; Mary Kilcoyne, contralto ; 
Inez Bauer, Edward Beck, basso; Ralph 
Sipperly, second comedy roles; Antonio 
Buffuano, musical director and Lew Mor- 
ton, bis assistant. t 

There will be only three matinees a 
week instead of six, as with the dramatic 
company, and the scale of prices has been 
rearranged for the musical engagement. 
At the matinee performances, instead of 
the former scale of ten and twenty cents, 
the prices will be fifteen and twenty-five 
cents, and at night twenty-five, fifty and 
seventy-five cents. 



PLAYERS OPEN IN SYRACUSE 

Syracuse, N. Y., April 28.— The Knick- 
erbocker Players returned to this city for 
a Summer engagement, opening Monday 
night at the Empire Theatre in "It Pays 
to Advertise." The company is headed by 
Frank Wilcox and Minna Gombel and in- 
cludes Thomas Emery, Mrs. Adelaide Hib- 
bard, Halbert Brown, Elmer H. Brown, 
Harold Salter, Coralinn Walde, Nona 
KeUy and Charles Mather, stage director. 
"Romance" is underlined for next week. 



RUTH ROBINSON IN PHILADELPHIA 

PMTt.tnriBint, April 30. — Rnth Robin- 
son, the popular young leading woman, 
has returned from the Coast after a suc- 
cessful engagement with the Morosco Stock 
Co. in Los Angeles, and is now starring 
with the Knickerbocker Players here, 
where she is very popular and has scored 
heavily in the following plays since open- 
ing "A Pair of Sixes," "House of Glass" 
and 'The Girl of the Golden West." 



FOX CO. PLAYERS CLOSE 

Bartlett, Texas, April 26. — William B. 
Morse, beavies, and Marjorie Shrewsbury, 
leads, close with the Roy E. Fox Players 
Saturday, terminating an eight months' 
engagement, Miss Shrewsbury having re- 
placed Hazel Fox during her retirement. 

POST OPENING IN SAN DIEGO 

Saw Diego, Cat, April 29. — The Jim 
Post musical comedy stock company closed 
its engagement at the Majestic Theatre, 
San Francisco, Saturday night, and is 
scheduled to open here to-night for an in- 
definite run. 



GRACE HAYLE WITH ALBANY CO. 

Albany, N. Y., April 30. — Grace Hayle, 
who was a member of the Bleecher Players 
Stock Company last season, has been en- 
gaged for this season's stock. 

L1DDY HAS CO. IN CHARLESTOWN 

Ceablestows, W. Va., April 80. — P. F. 
Liddy is to open a summer stock season 
at the Plaza Theatre. The company un- 
der his charge is known as the Reed Ros- 
ser Players. 



NEW PLAY AT UNION HILL 

Union Hnx, N. J., April 28.— The 
Keith's Hudson Players are presenting a 
new play this week, entitled "The Dan- 
ger Line," by Herbert Henderson. 

WHEELING TO HAVE STOCK 

Albert S. Vees is in town engaging a 
company and plays, for a Spring and Sum- 
mer season at the Victoria Theatre, 
Wheeling, W. Vs., opening May 7. 

DOYLE STOCK GIVES NEW PLAY 

TjrDIANAFOtJB, IndL, April 28.— "In 
Walked Uncle," by Robert Doyle, had its 
initial performance with the Doyle Circuit 
Stock here last week. 



INDIANAPOLIS TO 

HAVE STOCK 

AT MURAT 

WALKER CO. OPENING MAY 14 



Indianapolis, Ind., April 28. — Flans 
have now been definitely completed for 
the inauguration of a Summer season of 
stock at the Murat Theatre. 

Negotiations have been under way for 
several weeks for the Stuart Walker 
Players and the engagement is now as- 
sured. They will open Monday, May 14 
with "It Pays to Advertise" as the initial 
attraction. Mr. Walker desired to insure 
a successful engagement or at least make 
it worth while for his company to come 
here, and a campaign was conducted for 
subscriptions. The resnlt is evidently 
satisfactory as the company would not 
otherwise open. 

The members of the company to play 
here are the same young men and women 
who appeared here during the regular 
season with the Portmanteau theatre and 
include Gregory Kelly, V. L. Granville, 
Edgar Stenli, Lew Bedbury; Leon Cun- 
ningham, Stuart Walker, Florence Woller- 
son, Nancy Winston, Judith Lowry, Agnes 
and Beatrice Maude. 

The plays to be given will be recent re- 
leases, some of them never before seen in 
Indianapolis. 



COMPLETE WORCESTER CO. CAST 

Worcester, Mass., April 28. — The new 
Poli Players, which opened recently at the 
Grand Theatre, is headed by Ivan Miller 
and Beth Merrill. In their support are 
Pete Raymond, George Arvine, Louis 
Haynes, Jack McGrath, Sam Godfrey, M. 
J. Briggs, Louise Snnford, Isolda IUion, 
Jane Stewart. George Arvine is director 

and Bill Barry local manager. 



MISS BONSTELLE HEADS RELIEF 

Jessie Bonstelle is at the head of the 
stock committee of the Women of the 
Stage War Relief organization. Stock 
women all over the country are organizing 
to give whatever assistance they are best 
capable of. 



SANGER AND JORDAN MOVE 

Sanger and Jordan, after occupying 
offices in the Empire Theatre Building for 
twenty-five years, have moved to the 
Times Building, where they have taken the 
entire seventeenth floor, together with the 
Authore* Film Co.. Inc. 



TERESA DAE CLOSES WITH CO. . 

Oklahoma City, Okla.. April 27. — 
Teresa Dae has left the cast of the Over- 
holser Players and is returning to New 
York for a two months' rest, before en- 
tering upon her other work. 



L. VERNE SLOUT RESTING 

L. Verne Slout closed a season of thirty 
weeks with the Clifton Mallory Players, 
and has returned to his home in Michigan 
for a short rest. 



ELIZABETH DAYE IN TOWN 

Elizabeth Daye, leading woman with the 
Chester Wallace Players, of Butler, Pa., 
is in town for a few days. 



WALTER DAVIS CO. CLOSES 

St. Mart's, Pa.. April 28.— The Walter 
Davis Stock Co. dosed its repertoire sea- 
son here last Saturday. 



LEWIS TO HAVE CO. AT BOSTON 

Gene Lewis and Olga Worth, who closed 
their company in Evansville, Indiana, re- 
cently, have been engaged to head the stock 
at Norumbega Park, Boston, opening 
Saturday, May 26. The season is for 
twelve weeks and the opening play will be 
"It Pays to Advertise," followed by "Hit 
the Trail Holliday," and the "Eternal 
Magdeline." 

Before going to Boston Mr. Lewi* will 
create three new parts for the American 
Press Association at the little playhouse 
at Mt. Vernon, supporting the picture star 
Ormi Hawley, the plays to be produced in 
pictures and the stories carried by the 
press simultaneously with the showing of 
the pictures. The most successful of the 
plays will be given a Broadway showing, 
opening Labor Day with the original act- 
ing company. He opened in Mt. Vernon 
Monday. 



JUBILEE CO. IN 8STH WEEK 

Raleigh, N. C, April 28. — The Jewell- 
Golden Jubilee Co., under the management 
of Mas Golden, Is now in its eighty-firth 
week. At the present, the company Is 
on the Spergelberger time in the South. 
The company carries twelve people, featur- 
ing Leslie Golden. Roster of the company 
is Mildred Jekell, Isabella Morton, Marie 
Bennett, Max Golden, Conrad Hipp, Ed. 
Mack, Eddie Willholt, Ethel Cochrane. 
Hazel Welch, Nella Polo and Mary Hipp. 



EDWARDS-WILSON UNDER CANVAS 

Coldwater, Ohio, April 28. — The Ed- 
wards-Wilson Repertoire Co., which 
closed its opera house season recently, will 
open its tent season here next Monday. 
The company includes Ebert Edwards, 
manager ; Henrietta Wilson, Lois Wilson, 
Ross Wilson, B. Thompson, P. A. Gilder, 
E.. A. Meyers, Leon Blosser, Davidson 
Cnlbertson, Lester L. Elias and Llniy 
Little. 



NEW COMPANY IN KANSAS CITY 

Kansas City, Mo., April 28.— W. H. 
Quigley, who operates the Garden The- 
atre, will open a stock company there 
May 6, the Jack de Forest Co., which 
played there for three weeks, having 
moved to Clay Center, Kan., to open Its 
summer season under canvas. 



MISS HERTZ WITH CHICAGO CO. 

Chicago, May 1. — Marguerite Hertz, 
formerly with Maurice Browne's Little 
Theatre Co., will be leading woman with 
Herman Lieb's Stock Co. at the Wilson 
Theatre, when it opens the latter part of 
May or the first week in June. 



LANSHAW REP. CO. OPENING 

Six Lakes, Mich., April 29. — The Lan- 
shaw Stock and Repertoire Co. will play 
an eighteen weeks' engagement under 
canvas, opening here May 14, and going 
to North Grand Rapids for an extended 
ran. 



PURKISS CO. IN FT. DODGE 

Fort Dodge, la., April 28. — The Fur- 
kiss Stock Co. has begun a stock engage- 
ment at the Magic Theatre here opening 
with "The Stronger Love." Bills changed 
twice a week. 



GILMORE TO DIRECT "1BBETSON" 

The Messrs. Shubert have engaged W. 

H. Gilmore, stage manager for Arthur 

Hopkins, to direct the performance of 

"Peter Ibbetson" at the Republic Theatre. 



CO. FOR COLORADO SPRINGS 

Colorado Springs, Colo., April 27. — 
A summer stock company is being organ- 
ized in Chicago to open at the Grand The- 
atre shortly. 



TWO NEW STOCK RELEASES 

"The Melody of Youth" and "Shirley 
Kaye" are late releases for use in stock. 



OLIVER OPENING SECOND CO. 

Richmond, Ind., April 28.— The No. 2 
Oliver Stock Co. will open here next Mon- 
day with Mr. Oliver as leading man. 



14 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



May 2, 1917 




CIRCUSES AID 

RECRUITING 

FOR_NAVY 

RINGLINGS C ARRY O N CAMPAIGN 

Two circuseB have volunteered to do 
their share towards encouraging enlist- 
ment in the United States Navy. John 
Ringling, for the Barnum & Bailey Circus, 
and bis brother, Charles, for the Ringling 
Brothers Circus, are giving their co- 
operation in this direction to Commander 
K. M. Bennett, officer in charge of the 
United States Navy Publicity Bureau. 

The two circuses will carry with them 
a corps of United States officers and repre- 
sentatives to recruit wherever the cir- 
cuses exhibit, to give out information, to 
answer questions, and to distribute lit- 
erature. 

Circuses should be especially effective 
for propaganda purposes because of the 
large crowds they draw on show days. and 
because of the vastneas of the territory 
they cover during their tours. These two 
organizations, between now and next No- 
vember, will completely cover the entire 
country, exhibiting in small towns as Well 
aa large cities and attracting throngs from 
surrounding districts. 

Their campaign will be far-reaching 
and Is expected to bring forth big results. 

This week the Barnum & Bailey show 
i* in Philadelphia and the Ringling show 
is in St. Louis. 

CLYDE HAS TALKING BATTERY 

Among the talkers and lecturers with 
the World at Home Shows this season will 
be Thomas Rankine, King Karlo, Harry 
Knowles. Frank Lawrence, Omar Sami, W. 
A. Sangos. Will H. Hill, Jay O. Turner, 
Fred DeMar. C. E. Little, Joseph L. 
Logan. George T. McCarthy, Quartermaster 
E. J. Fuller, formerly of the U. S. A., and 
Lieutenant William Russell, of the Avia- 
tion Reserves. Each one has been assigned 
to his post and is waiting the signal to 
start the season. 



JAMES TEDDY SUING RINGLINGS 

James Teddy, a jumper, is suing the 
Ringling Brothers aa proprietors of the 
Barnum & Bailey circus for $8,500 for 
alleged breach of contract He was em- 
ployed with the circus during the season 
of 1916, at a salary of $200, and had 
been given a contract for- this season for 
the same amount. He claims he spent 
$1,000 for paraphernalia in preparation 
for this engagement and the judgment 
asked includes this amount and salary. 



GREAT EASTERN SHOWS OPEN 
Newark. N. J., April 28.— The Great 
Eastern Shows opened their season here 
Thursday and will exhibit here until next 
Saturday. The shows carry ten paid at- 
tractions, about twenty-five concessions, 
three free attractions and a band. 



MUSKOGEE BARS CIRCUSES 

Muskogee, Okla.. April 27.— The city 
council has passed an ordinance barring 
circuses and carnivals at Muskogee during 
the months of September and October, on 
account of the free State Fair being held 
here in September. 



"FROLIC" AS PORTABLE RTOE 

Stbeator, 111., April 28. — George M. 
Keithley and his brother, A. R. Keithley, 
are reconstructing the "Frolic." a riding 
device, into a portable ride for the World 
at Home Shows this season. 



RYE BEACH IS 

ENTIRELY NEW 

THIS YEAR 



GOOD ALE IS LIEUTENANT 

Frank Goodale, who conducted the air- 
ship flights at Palisades Park last sea- 
son, has received a commission as lieu- 
tenant in the aerial division of the United 
States Signal Service Corps. 

SHOWS DRAW IN McALESTER 

McAlester, Okla., April 27. — The James 
Patterson Shows and the Gollmar Bros. 
Circus gave two splendid performances 
here recently to packed' tents. 

MeCURREN WITH CLYDE SHOWS 
Chag. McCurrea is the lot superintendent 
vrtth the World at Home Shows. 



MANY INJURED AT CIRCUS 

Tbenton, N. J., April 28. — Two score 
persons were slightly injured and many 
more badly frightened when the reserved 
seats collapsed at the Cook Circus, show- 
ing at Princeton, Thursday night The 
accident happened just previous to the 
opening of the circus, and was due, it is 
alleged, to faulty construction. Those 
who had paid for reserved Beats were com- 
pelled to take other seats and others had 
to stand during the performance.. 



CIRCUS MAN TENDERED DINNER 

The members of the New York Police 
Department tendered a complimentary din- 
ner to George Black, chief detective - of 
the Bamum and Bailey. Circus at the 
Lyric Hotel last Friday. A vaudeville 
bill was presented by William E. Atwell, 
of the Sheedy booking office, consisting 
of Jones and Sylvester, Larry Oliver, 
Harry Bond, Mat Keefe of the Hippo- 
drome, and many others. 



STRONG MAN HAS ACCIDENT 

Tebbe Haute. Ind., April 28. — Jack 
Carson, better known as "Nemo the 
Strong Man," with the Famous Dixie 
Shows, met with a serious accident last 
Saturday. While pulling a heavy loaded 
wagon with his teeth he struck a brick, 
resulting in the loss of. all his molars. 



CIRCUS SHOWS FOR ORPHANS 

. Friday was "Orphans* Day" at Madison 
Square Garden, when the Barnum and 
Bailey Circus entertained 7.200 orphans 
from 72 institutions, giving a special per- 
formance for the kiddies in the morning. 



GAGG AT CIRCUS OPENING 

Tebbe Haut, Ind., April 28. — Major G. 
A. Gagg. general secretary and treasurer 
of the Hagenbach-Wallace Circus, left for 
Indianapolis April 17 to be on hand for 
the opening. April 18. 



GLEN ISLAND NOT TO OPEN 

The amusement park at Glen Island 
will not open this season. Although the 
place made much money in former years, 
its present owners think that its pros- 
perous days are over. 

ROBINSON SHOW LATE 

Indianapolis. Ind., April 28. — The John 
Robinson Show arrived here too late 
Thursday for the afternoon performance, 
but showed to a full house at night 



RINGLING SHOW BANQUETED 

Chicago. April SO. — .T. K. Dailey. man- 
ager of the City Hotel, extended a banquet 
to the Ringling show performers last 
Thursday night. 



ERNEST COOKE RETURNS 

Ernest Cooke has returned to the 
United States after a tour of the West 
Indies, and expects to reach New York 
late this month. 



MAY WIRTH TO DO NEW STUNT 

St. Louis, May 1. — Not satisfied with 
her many risky stunts May Wirth. Ring- 
ling's star rider, plans doing a "blindfold" 
riding trick. 



MANY IMPROVEMENTS ARE MADE 



When Rye Beach Park opens late this' 
month, it will be under a new manage- 
ment and will have undergone such a 
great change since last season that for- 
mer hahituea will not recognize the place, 
according to the statement of Austin 
Kelly, its new general m a n ager. 

When the park changed hands in De- 
cember and was bought from the Mon- 
tross Hardy Amusement Company by the 
Bye Beach Pleasure Park Company, 'it 
was decided to spare no expense in bring- 
ing about improvements and a complete 
transformation. Manager Kelly estimates 
that when the park opens its doors more 
than $100,000 will have been spent in re- 
modeling. 

Everything from the carrousel to the 
bathing beach has undergone repairs, 
while the main attractions are entirely 
new. 

" A dance ball has been built which over- 
looks and extends out from the Sound. It 
win accommodate more than fifteen hun- 
dred couples. A skating rink has also 
been built upon the waterfront. 

To the natural picnic grove have been 
added new benches and tables, and a new 
roller coaster has been built, running 
through the grove. 

There is also a new Fun House and 
numerous new legitimate amusement 
games. 

The management is making a strong 
play for picnic business and is doing con- 
siderable advertising to that end. 

The park will open on May IS, al- 
though its official Opening will not be held 
until May 26, by which time it is ex- 
pected to have everything in readiness. 

The Grand View Inn will open on the 
same day as the park and has been leased 
to Howard Bailey, manager of the St. 
James Hotel. 

All of the concessions will be owned and 
operated by the Rye Beach management 
which inaugurates a new policy. Hereto- 
fore each concession has been rented out. 

The new officers of the Rye Beach 
Pleasure Park Company are Louis Berni, 
president; E. J. Lauterbach, vice-presi- 
dent; Frank Hardy, secretary; Austin 
Kelly, treasurer and general manager. 

LEAVES DREAMLAND EXPO. SHOWS 

Blueftexd, W. Va., April 28.— Miss 
Bode Adams and staff, with five conces- 
sions, have left the Dreamland Exposition 
Shows to join the Veal Famous Shows. 
Charles Blanchard and wife have left and 
will join the Robertson and Jennings 
Amusement Co. Spot Ross, the knife rack 
king, Is also leaving the Dreamland Shows 
to join the Arena Amusement Co. 



LIEUT. RUSSELL WITH CARNIVAL 

Stbeator' I1L, April 28. — Lieutenant 
William Russell, chief of the New York 
school of wireless, and an officer of the 
Reserve Corps, arrived here early last 
week and has completed arrangements for 
the demonstration of scale models of the 
Zeppelin type of dirigible airships and 
aeroplanes, which will comprise the Aero- 
nautical Exposition, one of the leading 
attractions with the World at Home 
Shows. Russell will be in personal charge 
and will do the lecturing. 



CARNIVALS UNITE SHOWS 

The United Amusements and the Inter- 
Ocean Greater Shows have been combined. 
The former was organized by S. E. Thomp- 
son and J. W. Roberts. Thompson will be 
assistant manager of the company and will 
operate his own concessions. 



CLYDE CONTRACTS READING FAIR 

Reading, Pa,, April 29. — D. J. McDer- 
mit, secretary of the Reading Fair, has 
announced that he has closed contracts 
for the World at Home Shows, featuring 
the Kilties Band of thirty musicians ana 
dancers. The dates of the Reading Fair 
have been arranged to immediately follow 
the Ca^a^iBTi National Exhibition. James 
T. Clyde, owner and director of the World 
at Home Shows, said that the closing of 
this contract completed the season's route 
of twenty-eight weeks. 

RESENT STREET FAIR FRAUDS 
Chicago, April 30.— Several groups of 
business men in outlying districts are 
planning an entire revision of methods in 
conducting street carnivals. Unscrupu- 
lous promoters have heretofore run street 
fairs with a view to gaining huge personal 
profits and the business men are now de- 
termined to personally supervise next 
season's celebrations. 



BARKOOT OFFERS PARK TO U. S. 

Knoxvtlle, Tenn., April 80. — K. G. 
Barkoot owner and manager of the K. G. 
Barkoot Shows, has offered ChUhowee 
Park, of whits he is the lessee, to the 
Government as a training camp. 



COL. SEELEY SERIOUSLY ILL 

tbtmtih , N. Y.. April 27. — CoL Charles 
W. Seeley la very III at his home here. 



WORTHAMS FORM MILITARY CO. 

Ex Reno, Okla., April 28.— The Wortham 
Bros.' Show have, organized a military 
company, known- as Wortham's Minute 
Men. Ten of the- have already joined the 
United States Army. . 



CARNIVAL PEOPLE IN FIRE 

Nashua, N. H., April 28. — Property, 
consisting of frame buildings adjoining the 
Colonial Apartments, where members of the 
Wonderland Shows were stopping, was 
totally destroyed by fire recently. The 
carnival people escaped, dragging their 
trunks and belongings, while half dressed, 
to safe quarters. 



BABY TRJXIE DIES 

Washington, April 28. — Baby Trixie, 
the fat girl, whose serious illness was 
recorded in last week's paper, died in the 
Providence Hospital here Monday night 
She was to have gone with the Cook 
Bros* Shows this season to work in a 
side show. 



OMAR SAMI GETS FAT WOMAN 

Stbeatob, HI., April 28. — Omar Sami 
has secured as a single headliner for the 
World at Home Shows this- season, Miss 
Avour-du-Poise, said to be the fattest 
woman on earth, and will put her on 
exhibition on a parlor platform. 



DAVIS GETS PORTABLE RIDE 

Rockfokd, HL, April 28.— W. H. Davis 
has juBt received from the factory of 
Armitage and Guinn, of SpringvQle, N. 
Y., the first portable aeroplane carrousel, 
and will operate it with the World at 
Home Shows. 



SHOWMEN'S LEAGUE MOVES 

Chicago. April 30. — The Showmen's 
League of America is moving into the 
fifth floor of the Crilly Building. Its head- 
quarters were formerlv in the Saratoga 
Hotel. . 



KENNEDY SHOW FOR DECATUR 

Decatur, HI.. April 28. — One of the 
Kennedy Carnival Companies will play 
Decatur week of May 14, under the au- 
spices of the Loyal Order of Moose. 

CIRCUS GIRLS JOIN RED CROSS 

Chicago. April 28. — The girls of the 
Ringling ballet (300 in all) have organized 
to affiliate with the Red Cross and wfll 
make bandages on tour. 

CIRCUS MAN IS DOORMAN 

Chicago, April 30. — Charles Font, aa 
old-time circus man, is now doorman of 
the Avenue Theatre. 



May 2, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



15 



WESTERN OFFICE, 

Room 210 

35 SO. DEARBORN ST. 



Cm 




FOR ADVERTISING 
RATES 

Phone Randolph 5423 



RACE HATRED 

MEASURE 

VETOED 



THEATRICAL, MEN JUBILANT 



Chicago theatrical men are overjoyed 
over the action of Governor Lowden, who, 
after much consideration and pressure, 
lias vetoed the Jackson bill, drawn to pre- 
vent the exhibition of such pictures as 
"The Birth of a Nation," on the ground 
that they excited race hatred. 

They believed the passage of the bill 
would be a blow at their liberty and are 
much pleased at its defeat. 

The bill was introduced by Representa- 
tive Robert R. Jackson, a Negro member 
of the house. Because of its broad 
phraseology, the bill tended to the belief 
that the present national crisis was im- 
plied and met with little opposition until 
it reached the Governor. 

In vetoing the hill, the Governor said 
its terms were too vague. 

"A criminal law," the veto message 
stated, "should be framed in precise lan- 
guage." 

It also went on to say, that if this bill 
should become a law, a law-abiding pro- 
ducer might make a presentation in the 
best of good faith, without believing it 
tended to incite race hatred; yet the jury, 
under the terms of the law, might con- 
vict him of a crime. 

The measure passed the Illinois State 
House and Senate by an overwhelming ma- 
jority because it was believed to be the 
highest demonstration of patriotic senti- 
ment by theatrical managers. 

REMICK STOPS OFF HERE 

J. H. Remick, head of J. H. Remick & 
Co., visited his Chicago office last Mon- 
day, on his way to French Lick Springs, 
Ind. He will return to Chicago for a 
longer stay in two weeks. ' ' 



SAHARET PHOTOS AUCTIONED 

A box containing eighty-three photos of 
Saharet, were auctioned off with other 
effects of Fritz Von Frantzius, the broker, 
whose infatuation for the dancer cost him 
a fortune. 



MEREDITH IS WITH CORRELL 

E. E. Meredith, who conducted "The 
Missouri Breeze," in the Crill Building, is 
now making his headquarters with the 
Correll agency. 



BLOCK WORKING FOR DU VRIES 

Jack Block, previously identified as a 
solicitor for theatrical papers, is now 
booking acts under the wing of Sam Du 
Tries. 



LUISE PLAYS THE "LOOP" 

After playing many road and outlying 
W. V. M. A houses, Luise de Fogie has 
accepted a "fill-in" week at McVicker's. 

ACTOR MARRIES ACTRESS 

Ray Fay, of Carroll, Keating and Fay, 
married Bessie Welch, character come- 
dienne, in Chicago, last "week. 



VIVA ETHEUA SEEKS DIVORCE 

Viva Winebrenner-Griffitbs, known in 
vaudeville as Viva Ethelia, a niece of 
Lillian Nordica, is seeking a divorce in 
the Circuit Court at Goshen, Indiana, on 
grounds of non-support. She married 
Hnrvey ' R. Griffiths, a portrait painter, 
now employed in a Loop department 
store, in Chicago, in 1910. 

REVUE BUILT 'ROUND SONG 

"The Spirit of '76," a revue buill 
around Remick's "It's Time For Every- 
Boy to Be a Soldier," featuring Betty 
Russell, holds the big spot of the Green 
Mill Gardens' show. Martinez Randall 
appears as a corporal, going through mili- 
tary evolutions with the other principals. 

TENT SHOWS GETTING READY 

Drama and musical comedy, presented 
under canvas, will form a big part of 
early Summer amusements. Some pro- 
ducers have found this profitable in recent 
years, and the present season will be no 
exception. Chicago, as heretofore, will 
have a big representation. 



FORM NEW SISTER TEAM 

Cora Corrinne and Mabel Pattee have 
formed a sister team, playing W. V. M. A. 
time. 



WEIL REPRESENTS RICHMOND 

Milton Weil is now representing Maurice 
Richmond" in this city. 



MARK LEE PRODUCING 

. Mark Lee: is producing at the Majestic 
Theatre, Milwaukee. "-,■- 



LOVING CUP FOR SHAYNE 

Vaudeville agents and managers have 
presented Ed Sbayne, veteran booking 
agent of the W. V. M. A. forces, with a 
beautiful loving cup set, In honor of his 
twenty-fifth wedding anniversary. An in- 
formal reception was held on the Associa- 
tion floor. 



ORGANIZE PRODUCING FIRM 

Hilliard Campbell and Edward M. 
Moore have opened an artists' representa- 
tive and producing office. They intend to 
specialize on "girl" acts. Three theatres 
of their own and a group of small houses 
come under the direction of the firm. 



AARON JONES RETURNS 

Aaron Jones, of Jones, Linick & Shaefer, 
returned from an Eastern trip to his desk 
In the Rialto building, last Friday. A few 
days later Ralph Kettering, the press, 
apent, came back from a business journey 
through Indiana. 



GRIFFEN'S SON DEAD 
Gerald E. Griffon, Jr., son of "Ireland's 
Sweetest Singer," died early in April, 
when only two days old. Griffen married 
while touring Australia at the head of his 
own Irish company. 

BROTHER OF ACTRESS ENLISTS 

Charles Douglas Fisher, brother of Lola 
Fisher, leading lady with "Good Gracious 
Annabelle," at the Cort, was one of the 
recruits who left Chicago for Jefferson 
Barracks. _____^__ 

SONG WRITER BECOMES UMPIRE 

George Mortality, the lyricist-ballplayer, 
is now an umpire for the American 
League. Illness has prevented Moriarity 
from playing active ball. 



SPAHN ILL 

J. Leslie Spahn, head of the road show 
hoaring his name, is ill, at Waukegan. 
His illness has not caused the cancella- 
tion of bookings. 



FREEBORN JOINS "MR. DETECTIVE" 
Hudson Freeborn, who supported Lina 
Abarbanell in^Tho "Red Canary," is with 
Oeorge Cho in" "Mr. Detective." 



ORIGINATES NEW DANCE 

Mile. Marion is Introducing a new 
dance called "Hawaiian Cranberry," at 
Green Mill Gardens. 



BERT CARL WITH LE CLAIR 
Carl and Le Clair, now playing the 
Middle West, includes Bert Garl, formerly 
of .Carl, and Rheil. 



COOL WEATHER 

AIDS MANY 

THEATRES 



JULE JOSE DOING CLUB WORK 

Jul* Jose, "The Spanish Girl," is doing- 
club work in Chicago. 



LATE SPRING LENGTHENS SEASON 



The continued cool weather has caused 
somewhat of an upset in the carrying out 
of managerial plans, made weeks ago in 

conformity with the annual custom. Of 

course those theatres which house dra- 
matic attractions will close as per the 
original schedule, not because of lack of 
attendance, but from lack of attractions. 

The continued cool weather, however, 
has imbued local managers with the idea 
that vaudeville can be run at its full 
Winter strength for weeks to come and 
it is more than likely this idea will be 
carried out. 

The Palace will discontinue vaudeville 
early because the Shuberts hold a Sum- 
mer lease. The Majestic, however, which 
has weathered the heated term before, 
will remain open all Summer. 

When the heat strikes us the neighbor- 
hood theatres will close, but their losa 
will be compensated for by the vaudeville 
given in the Summer parks. 

With the approach of June there is 
much activity in the tabloid producing 
ranks and there is every promise that this 
popular form of entertainment will ob- 
tain in many of the better class of _the 
outdoor resorts. 



GERSON ENTERTAINS MAYORS 

Sam P. Gerson, general representative 
for the Shuberts, was a very busy indi- 
vidual last week, arranging special per- 
formances for visiting mayors of Illinois 
cities. The executives came to Chicago 
for a food conference, but managed to find 
time to sandwich in a little entertain- 
ment, under the theory that "music with 
meals" is not harmful. 



PARRY SUCCEEDS WOODS 

Frank Parry will succeed EL H. Woods, 
manager of the Columbia, Chicago's only 
Loop burlesque theatre, June 1. Woods 
will probably again align himself with 
moving picture interests, which claimed 
his attention before he returned to the 
management of the Columbia, after a 
season's absence. 



CLARK HAS MAN ARRESTED 

Frank Clark, Chicago professional man- 
nger for Waterson, Berlin & Snyder, 
caused the arrest of a mysterious stranger 
at a cabaret, last week, because remarks 
made by the man convinced Clark that he 
was mixed up in a plot to "slug" him. 



HAZEL OLSON GETS DIVORCE 

Mrs. Hazel Olson, a vaudeville per- 
former, received a divorce in Judge Foell's 
court last week, charging that her hus- 
band spent a week and a half with an- 
other woman last January, in Peoria. 



KATHERINE SELSOR MARRIED 

Katharine Selsor, "The Woman Who 
Talks," seen in Chicago vaudeville re- 
cently, has married Alfred Cooper, a non- 
professional, at Appleton, Wis. . . 



RUSH FOR CABARETS 

With the regular vaudeville season 
ueariug its end, many local hcadlincrs 
are closing contracts for Summer engage- 
ments at cabarets. However, the cabaret 
situation is not as bright as heretofore, 
because most of the managers fear bad 
business due to war-time conditions. The 
smaller cabarets are constantly fighting 
each other, each charging that the other 
is not conforming strictly to the law. It 
is this condition that brings the greatest 
solace to the performer, for, the bitter 
rivalry induces each cabaret to endeavor 
to excel the others in feature attractions. 



MANAGER'S SON KILLED 
Walter J. Bergamini, seven-year-old son 
of Paul, manager of Colosimo's Cafe, was 
killed, trying to "flip" a coal wagon, last 
Thursday. 

GRACE ARNOLD SUES 

Grace Arnold sued her husband Richard, 
also David F., for divorce, last week, 

charging cruelty. 



NEW FIRM IS VERSATILE 

Frank Morrell and Bert La Mont are 
producing acts in various fields. Frank 
Morrell brought bis "Seaside Revue" to the 
Wilson recently. Their "Speed Me- 
chanics" is a feature with the Ringling 
Show. In addition to this, they are nego- 
tiating with the Columbia wheel for a new 
burlesque show next season. 



TO DEMAND MORE PAY 

It Is becoming increasingly difficult to 
secure competent theatre attaches, because 
economic conditions afford greater salaries 
in other lines of endeavor. The unions 
governing the various lines of work are 
preparing to demand salary increases, ef- 
fective with the opening of next season. 



BERNHARDT PICTURE DRAWS 

Owing to the extensive publicity given 
to the reports of the continued illness of 
Mme. Bernhardt, the motion picture, 
"Mothers of France," in which this actress 
is the star, is proving a big box-office at- 
traction in Chicago's neighborhood the- 
atres. 



J. L. 4 S. MOVE 

Jones, Linick & Schaefer have moved 
their general offices from the Orpheum 
Building to the fifth floor of their new 
Rialto Theatre Bnilding. Part of the old 
offices will be retained for the use of the 
managerial staff of the Orpheum The- 
atre. 



FLASH ANTHEM ON SCREEN 

Because many patriotic people do not 
seem to have mastered the words of "The 
Star-Spangled Banner," Chicago moving 
picture magnates have decided to flash the 
words of the song on the screen as house 
pianists play the number. 



BROADWAY CO. REMAINS 

The Broadway Music Corp. is the only 
publishing concern remaining in the Ran- 
dolph building since May 1. AH other 
music concerns were forced to abdicate in 
conformance with a new ruling of the 
building owners. 

PRESS CLUB IS PATRIOTIC 

The Chicago Press Club, largely due to 
the Influence of John L. ("Jack") Weber 
and A. Milo Bennett, the dramatic agent, 
has subscribed for an auto-ambulance to 
be used by the American Ambulance 
Corps. 

ANTHEM DODGERS PUNISHED 

Unpatriotic people who failed to rise 
upon hearing "The Star Spangled Banner" 
in Chicago public places received all kinds 
of harsh treatment recently, from forcible 
ejections to fines for disorderly conduct. 

WINNIPEG SEASON EXTENDED 

Csl Griffis announces that the Orpheum, 
Winnipeg, will not dose on the date orig- 
inally Intended, because of the continued 
good attendance. It will remain open as 
long as business keeps up. 



WILLIAMS SUCCEEDS KOLB 
Al. Williams hss succeeded Mat Kolb at 
the Empress, Milwaukee, Kolb. having 
secured a position fat Toronto. 



16 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



May 2, 1917 





COMPOSERS' SOCIETY 
GRANTED INJUNCTION 

Judge Mayer braes Order Restraining 
Royal Pastime Amusement Co. from 
Performing Copyrighted Com- 
positions in Its Theatres 

In their first step to force the payment 
of a license fee for the performing OF 
rendition rights of musical selections by 
orchestras or musicians in the motion pic- 
ture theatres, the American Society of 
Authors, Composers and Publishers have 
won a victory through the failure of the 
Royal Pastime Amusement Co. to oppose 
the application for an injunction sought by 
Raymond Hubbell and John Golden in the 
United States District Court last week. 

The plaintiffs in this action alleged that 
the Royal Pastime Amusement Co. were 
having performed in the Begun Theatre, 80 
West 116th Street, "Poor Butterfly," and 
"Hello, I've Been Looking for Yon," with- 
out the consent of the author and composer 
or the payment of a license fee for such 
use. 

A temporary injunction restraining the 
defendants from performing these numbers 
was obtained from Judge Julius Mayer two 
weeks ago and the argument to make the 
injunction permanent before trial was to 
have come up before Judge Mayer last Fri- 
day morning. However, J. Robert Rubin, 
who was the attorney for the defendants, 
failed to appear to oppose the motion and 
Judge Mayer granted the injunction with- 
out the submission of briefs or argument 
on the part of Nathan Burkan, attorney 
for the Authors' Society and the plaintiffs 
in the action. 

This suit was brought as a test case, the 
defendant being selected by the New York 
Motion Picture Exhibitors' League for the 
proceedings. 

Through the allowance of this injunc- 
tion no theatre in New York will be per- 
mitted to play the compositions of mem- 
bers of the American Society unless they 
pay the license fee demanded, which grades 
from $5 to $15 a month, according to the 
size of the theatre. 



"TRAIL" SONG AT HIPPODROME 

At the concert at the New York Hip- 
podrome Sunday night recently a tremen- 
dous sensation was caused by the sing- 
ing of "There's a Long, Long Trail" by 
Madame Edvina, the well-known prima 
donna. She sang this remarkable song — 
the haunting, melodic march success of 
Europe and 'America — with vast feeling 
and wondrous effect, and the immense au- 
dience was visibly thrilled. It is one of 
the most wonderfully appealing songs 
ever written, and M. Witmark 4 Sons, itB 
publishers, are overwhelmed by the de- 
msnd for it from every quarter. 

WESTON SINGS JEROME SONGS 

Willie Weston, who is -playing the 
V. B. 0. time, is successfully featuring 
the William Jerome song "Turn to the 
Bight." The Jerome catalogue is at 
present in a particularlv flourishing con- 
dition and "M-I-S-S-I-S-S-I-P-P-I," "If I 
Catch The Guv That Wrote Poor Butter- 
fly." and "Cotton Piekin' Time In Ala- 
bam" are attracting much attention. 

TRIANGLE'S BIG WINNER 

The Triangle Music Publishing Co., 
which has recently opened offices in the 
Strand Theatre building, is being deluged 
with requests for the song "Don't Leave 
Me, Daddy," which Is one of the big suc- 
cesses of the west and south. 

Sam. L. Rosenbaum, general manager of 
the company, is in charge of the New York 
offices. 



WOODS SIGNS WARWICK 

Robert Warwick win appear in an old- 
fashioned spoken drama under the direc- 
tion of A. H. Woods next season. This 
will not interfere with big film work. .- 



"GOOD-BYE LITTLE GIRL" REVIVED 
Time slips by, and although it is a 
good many years since everybody was 
singing and whistling it, yet it seems but 
yesterday that "Good-bye, Little Girl, 
Good-bye," that melodic march gem by 
Gut. Edwards, was the one tune and senti- 
ment we simply could not get away from. 
It was a mighty good song. It still is. 
How general this opinion is may be 
gaged from the fact that though seem- 
ingly dead the song has only been slum- 
bering all these years, waiting the right 
moment to start all fresh again. And the 
moment has come. The publishers, M. 
Witmark & Sons, have been as nearly as- 
tonished as publishers ever can be at the 
sudden demand for copies of "Good-bye, 
Little Girl, Good-bye." It is growing by 
leaps and bounds, and they have been 
obliged, not at all unwillingly, to issue a 
brand-new edition, with a title page that 
is alone worth the price of the song. 

The first hint the publishers got of its 
possible resurrection was a demand for 
200 copies of this song from somewhere 
on the border when the boys were down 
there keeping tabs on the restless Mexi- 
cans. Now that the big war has poked 
its nose right into our midst the public 
is clamoring for some of the older favor- 
ites, and none among them more so than 
"Good-bye, Little Girl, Good-bye." 

PRAISE FOR "HONG KONG" 

Sam Danks is the official interpreter at 
the Leo Feist offices and all letters and 
newspapers of a foreign tongue are 
brought to his desk for translation. Up 
until last week he had never been stuck, 
but he went down to defeat when one of 
the professional men brought in a news- 
paper with an article regarding the new 
Feist song "Hong Kong" printed in Chi- 
nese. The Feist house is using the news- 
paper in connection with the advertising 
of the song and all who are curious to 
read the criticism of the new number are 
invited to inspect it. 

COHAN SONG IN REVUES 

George M. Cohan's famous patriotic 
song hit, "You're a Grand Old Flag," is 
being featured in a number of the big 
cabaret revues along Broadway. 

Judging from its enthusiastic reception 
it is due for a second lease of life. The 
Maurice Richmond Music Company pub- 
lishes it. 



"SWEETHEART" IS A NOVELTY 
"I Called Yon My Sweetheart," a novelty 
ballad by Howard Johnson, Grant Clarke 
and Jimmy Monaco, is fast forging to the 
front as One of the best applause getters 
of the season. The scores of singers fea- 
turing the nnmber are finding it one of the 
surest encore winners. Leo Feist is the 
publisher. 



JOHNSON NOW A TEACHER 

Rosamond Johnson, the popular song- 
writer, composer of "Bamboo Tree," and 
other famous song hits, and a vaudeville 
partner of the late "Bob" Cole, is now the 
director of music of the New York Music 
School Settlement. 



ERNEST R. VOIGHT PROMOTED 
Ernest R. Voisht. promotion manager 
of the house of G. Schirmer. has been ap- 
pointed general manager of the Boston 
Music Co.. the most important branch of 
the Schirmer establishment. 



MCKINLEY'S NOVELTY NUMBER 

The McKinley Music Co., of Chicago and 
New York has just put out a novelty num- 
ber by Roger Graham and Spencer Wil- 
liams entitled "I Aint Got Nobody Much" 
(and Nobody Cares for Me). 



SKJDMORE'S NOVELTY SONGS 

Will E. Skidmore, who stands alone as 
the foremost composer of his kind of 
gongs, has surpassed himself. His "Pray 
for the lights to Go Out" scored a moat 
sensational hit, and firmly established 
Mr. Skidmore as one of the principal 
popular song composers of the day. Now 
his newest coon shout "It Takes a Long, 
Tall, Brown-Skin Gal to Make a Preacher 
Lay His Bible Down" is registering an 
even greater hit than did his older num- 
ber. Although it is still young it is 
being heard wherever there is a singer 
of coon songs, and it is a very popular 
fox-trot. Jos. W. Stern & Co. are the 
publishers. 



"HY-SINE" WINS SUCCESS 

One of the instrumental hits in New 
York City appears to be Carey Morgan's 
oriental one-step "Hy-Sine." It may be 
conservatively said that a trip around the 
cabarets of New York will reveal very 
few places in which this number is not 
played several times during the course of 
the evening. This is bound to be Mr. 
Morgan's biggest success and that is going 
some when it is remembered that Mr. 
Morgan composed "My Own Iona," "Ha- 
waiian Sunshine" and a number of other 
highly appreciated compositions. 

STERN'S NEW STATE SONG 

The profession's appreciation of the 
merit of "Somewhere In Delaware," the 
new "State song" by Will J. Harris and 
Harry L Robinson, is increasing daily. 
Doubtless, there will always be "State" 
songs as long as there are songs at all, 
but this little number is deserving of a 
favorable comment inasmuch as it is one 
that lends itself nicely to the perform- 
ance of almost any singing act. Jos. W. 
Stem & Co. are its publishers. 



A PERTINENT QUESTION 

When you put the question "What kind 
of an American are you?" the answer 
must be concise and clear. This question 
has been put up in song form, and the 
answer it draws from audiences, wherever 
it is sung, clearly pronounces it to be the 
song of the moment. The Broadway 
Music Company are the publishers. 



VON TILZER SONG ON THE COAST 

"Jack" Gray, now playing on the Pa- 
cific Coast, is stopping the show at every 
performance with Harry Von Tiller's 
clever song "With His Hands In His 
Pockets." The big hit of the song is an 
extra patriotic verse for which Mr. Gray 
gives credit to "Bennie" Bornstein. 



ELLIS FEATURES MORRIS SONG 

Harry Ellis, who scored one of the hits 
of the Reveria Theatre bill last week, 
closed his act with the new Joe. Morris 
song "America, Here's My Boy." The 
song made a fitting closing for a particu- 
larly strong act. 

J. H. REMICK ON VACATION 
Jerome H. Remick is spending a two 
weeks' vacation at French Lick Springs. 
At the conclusion of his vacation be is ex- 
pected in New York, where he plans to 
give considerable attention to the music 
business. 



HARRIS HITS IN BALTIMORE 
Willa Holt Wakefield made Baltimore 
sit up and take notice last week when 
she sang the two big Charles K. Harris 
hits, "Thou Shart Not Steal a Heart 
Away" and "A Study in Black and 
White." 



KELLERMANN EXTENDS CONTRACT 

Annette KeDermann, whose contract at 
the Hippodrome was to have expired last 
Saturday night, has extended it to next 
Saturday, when "The Big Show"- closes. 



NEW McJONLEY OFFICES 

The new professional offices of the Mc- 
Kinley Music Co., in the Exchange build- 
ing, will be opened on May 7. "Bob" 
Russack win be connected with the Mc- 
Kinley professional department. 



MAUD LAMBERT SINGS NEW SONG 

For the first time on any stage, the 
new Irish Bong by J. Keirn Brennan and 
Ernest R. Ball, "Somewhere in Ireland," 
was sung by Maud Lambert at the Al- 
hambra Theatre last Thursday night. To 
say the song proved a hit is to put it too 
mildly. Billy Sunday himself would find 
it hard to lay his tongue on just the right 
expressions to adequately describe the 
enthusiastic greeting this new Irish gem 
received when the composer's wife first 
essayed it. It was a big, smashing suc- 
cess right from the dot. "Somewhere in 
Ireland" is the best thing "Jack" Bren- 
nan has done by a long way since "A 
Little Bit of Heaven," with which he and 
Ernie Ball Bet the world on fire, and they 
are certainly responsible for another big 
winner here. Incidentally, of course, 
"Somewhere in Ireland" adds another 
bright gem to the scintillating diadem of 
Emerald Isle hits issued by the "House 
of Irish Hits"— M. Witmark & Sons. 



Sharps and Flats 

By TEDDY MORSE 



Troup ing through Pa. its Coal! Coal! 
Coal! Everywhere and piled mountain 
high for miles. Cars by the hundreds 
loaded with it. Smoke-3tacks shooting 
heavenward — the smoke of it! Acre upon 
acre of land naked and bare of all vege- 
tation, trees dead, and spook-like in fan- 
tastic shapes and positions caused by the 
black, muck-like wash from the collieries. 

The Bethlehem Steel works — a monster 
and formidable beyond a column-writer's 
feeble vocabulary. Chas. J. Schwab, look- 
ing very much like Gus. Edwards (or 
does Gus look like him?) says he's got 
it on the Krupp works in size and output. 
That's bad, eht 

Lancaster is a nifty town. The Hotel 
Brunswick is a corker. Everything there 
that the big town hotel has. Noted for 
(and justly, too) its pretty girls. My! 
there are bundles of 'em. And so well- 
fed and healthy looking. 

Bridges guarded everywhere by Uncle 
Sam's boys, with business-like air and 
rifles. But that coal! Piled mountain 
high and each lump worth nearly one cent 
a piece. 

He puts "pep" in a hymn that you 
never heard before. "Brighten the Corner 
Wtfere You Are" should be a popular fox- 
trot. Be sure to see and hear him. Like 
Billy Sunday, he's a wonder. 

Scranton Al in every respect. Piano 
stores. Phonographs, victrolas, 10 cent 
stores and music shops going at a great 
rate. Everybody busy and seemingly 
prosperous. 

Charlie didn't meet us at the train. 
Too busy making up the pay envelopes 
of a few thousand men. 

Harrisburg. Ugh! Bad hotels and lots 
of them. The town needs many things 
and needs them badly. 

York, Scranton, Williamsport — excellent 
examples of live towns. 

The 100 per cent., 18 karat, pure, unde- 
feated champion song booster has arrived. 
Homer Rodeheaver is his name, Billy Sun- 
day's music master, hymn-writer, singer, 
trombone player, announcer, and all- 
around handy man. If you, who are -in- 
terested in songs and their making, would 
see this man, watch his work, hear his 
effects with 20,000 voices, and see his 
results, you could not help but tip your 
hat to him. And Homer's hymn-book 
sells like a song hit at a 10 cent counter. 
He owns nearly all the copyrights on the 
hymns in it, makes Victor records and — 
well— he doesn't miss a thing. 

"Livery Stable" Blues, The "Fertilizer" 
Rag and the "Limbnrger" La-La. Attach 
gas-mask before playing. 



And A 1 toon a— Oh yes! 
the tuners cdme'from. 



That's where 



May 2, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



17 




WATSON RAISES 

SALARIES OF 

COMPANY 

WILL PLAY EXTRA WEEKS 



Billy Watson baa arranged three extra 
weeks for his Beef Trust show, and will 
play the Gaiety, Pittsburgh; the Star, 
Cleveland, Ohio, and the Gaiety, Detroit, 
in the order named, commencing May 14. 

Owing to the high cost of food, Watson 
has raised the salaries of all the members 
of his show $3 per week over the figures 
stipulated in the contract covering the 
supplementary season. 

The United States Beauties close their 
on in Paterson. 



SHERIDANS CELEBRATE WEDDING 

Phil and Chrissie Sheridan had a num- 
ber of their friends join them at their 
home in Bath Beach Sunday night. April 
29, to properly mark the thirty-fifth an- 
niversary of their marriage. 

One of Charles "Beefsteak" Springer's 
celebrated thumb bits was served and 
proved a real feast. Favors in the form 
of fans, headgear and the decorations 
were all in red, white and blue. 

Many handsome presents were received 
by the couple, including a coral ring for 
Mrs. Sheridan. 

The list of guests included Mr. and Mrs. 
Sam A. Scribner, J. Herbert Mack, who 
was active as assistant chef; George Peek 
and his daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Harry C. 
Jacobs, Mr. and Mrs. John G. Jermon, 
Mr. and Mrs. George W. Meyer, Mr. and 
Mrs. H. Hyams, Win. S. Campbell, Rose 
Sydell, Lillian Townsend, Florence Car- 
denis, Mary Henry, Margaret Henry, 
Marie Henry, Phil Henry, Mrs. Andy Os- 
borne, Leon Laski and Frances and Fred 
Mnller. 

The toasts were many, and if good 
wishes count, Chrissie and Phil will cele- 
brate many more anniversaries. The 
beefsteak was certainly the hit of the 
season. 



PEARSON NAMES NEW SHOW 

Arthur Pearson's second show on the 
Columbia Wheel, under his newly acquired 
additionnl franchise, will be called "Girls 
a la Carte." Dan Marble, who has been 
with Sbubert shows, Reba Hess, Nettie 
Hyde and Jack Reddy have been engaged. 



BEN HARRIS LOSES MOTHER 

Ben Harris, manager of the Burlesque 
Revue, was called to bis home in New 
York last week on account of the illness 
Of his mother and reached her before she 
died, April 26. 



LOUIS ROBIE IN NEW YORK 

Lou Robie has returned from the South 
very much improved in health and will 
summer at Oradel, N. J. 



BECKER TO BE MANAGER 

Irving Becker graduates into the man- 
agers division next season, when he will 
have charge of Maurice Wainstock's Show. 

SINGER HOLDS LEADING WOMAN 

Lucille Mannion, of the Behman Show, 
baa been signed for next season by Jack 
Singer. 

NELLIE GREENWOOD RE-ENGAGED 

Nellie Greenwood has been re-engaged as 
soubrette for the "Mititary Maids" next 



SCHNEIDER IS PRODUCING 

Dave Schneider, treasurer of Miner's 
Bronx Theatre, has blossomed forth as an 
impressario and, as soon as the season 
closes will leave to join the "Hawaiian 
Novelty Company," of which he and Mart 
McCormick are owners and producers. It 
opens at Portland, Me., Saturday. 

Princess Verona, a Hawaiian girl, is sup- 
ported by an all-star cast which includes 
May McCormick, late ingenue of the Cherry 
Blossoms. The music is by John MarteU. 



HASTINGS TO ENLARGE SHOW 

Harry Hastings "Big Show" will be 
augmented next season by the Runaway 
Four, a singing, dancing and acrobatic act. 
Hastings has also secured Dan Coleman, 
Phil Peters, Alma Bauer, Hazel Lorraine, 
Anna Connors, Frank Mallaban. Larry 
Nelms will be retained as manager. 



COLUMBIA GETS EXTRAS 

The Social Maids, May 7, and The 
Maids of America, May 14, will be the 
post season attractions at the Columbia, 
New York. The Hip-Hip-Horray Girls' 
Summer Show, with the Diving Show and 
the Ice Skating Carnival, is all ready to 
open there May 21. 



JOHNNY WEBER LEAVES CAMPBELL 

After fifteen consecutive seasons together, 
Wm. S. Campbell and Johnnie Weber have 
decided to make different arrangements for 
next year and the popular little comedian 
will be seen with an organization other 
than the Rose Sydell Show. 



WILL HAVE LONG SEASON 

Manager Ed. E. Daley will give bis 
"French Frolics" a long run after the close 
of the regular season. Extra time calls 
for dates at Chicago, Indianapolis, The 
Ohio Circuit, and Cleveland, where the tour 
will end on June 2. 



WOLFFHEIM SIGNS LA BERGERE 

Eugene Wolffheim, manager of the Metro- 
pole Amusement Co., has signed Elsie La 
Bergere to appear as an extra attraction 
with. "The Girls in Toyland" next season. 
Miss Bergere is playing Vaudeville at 
present. 



CHAS. T. TAYLOR DEAD 

Chas. Taylor, formerly manager of the 
Gaiety, Buffalo, N. Y., died Friday, April 
27, at his home in that city. He bad been 
obliged by illness to retire from the position 
several months sgo. 



BEDDil TO HAVE 2 SHOWS 

"Jean Bedini" will have two shows next 
season. The "Puss Puss" Co. will again 
toor the Columbia Houses and "The Forty 
Thieves" on the American Wheel will be 
the new show. 



ROSE SYDELL CLOSES SEASON 

The Rose Sydell Show finished its sea- 
son at Hnrtig and Semons, New York, 
April 28. Miss Sydell has missed only 
two matinees during the season. 



R. C. PATTON MARRIED 

Buffalo, April 30. — B. C. Patton, man- 
ager of the Gayety, was married April 23 
to Hope Sawyer, of the Twentieth Century 
Maids Co. here. 



JACOBS GETS 

$3,800 FOR 

FUND 

WORKING HARD FOR BENEFIT 



HASTINGS SIGNS LE VAN 

Harry Le Van will be with the Tango 
Queens next season. 



BURLESQUER RECOVERING 
Grace Sachs, who recently lost her 
father, has been very ill at her home in 
Providence, R. I., but is now on the road 
to recovery. 

ED WROTHE ILL 

Owing to the illness of Ed. Wrotbe, 
Owney Martin had to substitute for him 
for several shows during the Rochester 
engagement. 



Henry C. Jacobs, of Jacobs and Jer- 
mon, has met with much encouragement 
in his appeal for contributions to the com- 
ing Actors' Fund Fair. 

Up to date his reports show returns 
of over $3,800 in cash, which has been 
collected through his persistent efforts in 
behalf of the Fund. He has touched all 
wires that promised results. 

When a full accounting has been made 
Mr. Jacobs is confident that be will have 
the pleasure of turning a round four 
thousand dollars over to Sam A. Scribner, 
who is in charge of the burlesque depart- 
ment of the Fair. 

Jacobs and Jermon have turned in an- 
other $250 to Mr. Scribner, the result of 
collections with the "Golden Crooks" 
show. 

In conjunction with Mrs. T. W. Dinkins, 
chairwoman of the Burlesque Fund Ladies' 
Department, Mr. Jacobs will be active up 
to the opening of and throughout the 
Fair. 



MINER'S HAS SPECIALS 

A number of specials have been provided 
for this week at Miner's Bronx during the 
"Follies of the Day" engagement. On 
Monday night a division of the Bronx 
C. S. Boy Scouts gave an exhibition drill 
and this feature will be retained for every 
night this week. A "Tryout," "Gift" and 
"Wrestling Night" will enliven the clos- 
ing week of the regular season. Next 
week will see a lot of "Tournament fea- 
tures." 



ADD $780 TO FUND 

While playing their Detroit engagement 
Zellah Russell and nine members of the 
"Burlesque Review" collected $780 for the 
Actors' Fund. The members of the com- 
pany also contributed $22.75 toward a 
fund for Chas. Robles, comedian with the 
Al. Reeves show, who was recently 
stricken blind. 



ELSIE BOSTELLE ENGAGED 

Elsie Bos telle has been engaged as 
prima donna by James E. Cooper for one 
of his shows on the Columbia Circuit next 
season. Last season she was prima donna 
with "The Maids of America." •■ 



JESSONS IN "MISCHIEF MAKERS" 

Chauncey and Kathleen Jesson have re- 
placed Charles Tyson and Ruth Barbour 
with the "Mischief Makers," an American 
Burlesque Circuit attraction. 



Burlesque Notes 



Ethel Nesbitt mourns the loss of her 
father, who died at Cincinnati April 20. 



VAUDE. GETS GERTRUDE LYNCH 

Gertrude Lynch, who was soubrette 
with "The Grown-Up Babies" on the 
American Burlesque Circuit this season, 
left for Philadelphia Sunday to commence 
rehearsing a vaudeville act which will be 
shown very soon in the neighborhood 
theatres. Miss Lynch will return to bur- 
lesque next season. 

RETURN TO UNION SQUARE 

Billy Spencer and Norma Brown will 
return to the cast of the Union Square 
Stock Company on May 14, after an ab- 
sence of almost a year. Others of the 
members of the old stock company to re- 
turn during the Summer will be Bert 
Weston and Billy Harris. 

CASMORE AND DOUGLAS UNITED 

Vic. Casmore and George Douglas, who 
have been separated since they appeared 
in the Ben Welsh show three years ago, 
will again be re-united next season with 
Jack Singer's "Behman Show." They will 
play principal parts and be featured in 
the production. 

OLYMPIC OPENERS CHOSEN 

"The Isle of Spice," and "The Two De- 
tectives" will be the initial offering of the 
Olympic Stock Company, which will in- 
augurate its summer season at the Olym- 
pic Theatre May 14. Jim Barton will be 
the principal comedian with the company. 

WILL RETURN TO VAUDEVILLE 

Grace Seymour, soubrette of the 
"Million Dollar Dolls," and a former 
vaudeviilian, will again return to vaude- 
ville in September when she will appear 
in a singing set, using exclusive songs, 
nnd accompanied by a pianist. 



Beneta White will be with the Boston 
Howard Stock this summer as an end 
pony. 

Mrs. .Elizabeth Chase, mother of Ethel 
Levy, of the Bon Tons, died April 28 of 
pneumonia. 

Joe Barton will open with the summer 
Stock at the Savoy, San Francisco, 
May 19. 

Jake Strouse, agent of the "Lady Buc- 
caneers," has been re-engaged by Dick 
Zeisler for next season with the same 
show. 



HILL GIRLS CONTRIBUTE $135 
The Actors' Fund was enriched $133 
last week when the members of Gus Hill's 
"Midnight Maidens" Company made a col- 
lection from the audience in the two 
houses operated by Counihan & Shannon 
at Perth Amboy and Plainfield, N. J. 

GOLDEN CROOKS FINISH 

Jacobs and Jermon will close their 
"Golden Crooks" show at Hoboken, N. J., 
May 5. This will close the Casino, Phila- 
delphia, on the same day. 

CAMPBELL RE-ENGAGES TWO 

William S. Campbell has re-engaged 
Eddie Smith and Kate Pullman for the 
cast or* "Rose Sydell's London Belles," for 
next season. 



GALLAGHER LOSES MOTHER 

The mother of Manager George Galla- 
gher of the Gaiety, Kansas City, died last 
week. 



STAGE STARS ACT FOR P. W. L. 

A long bill was presented at the Cri- 
terion Theatre last Tuesday afternoon foi 
the benefit of the Professional Woman'i 
League. The program was rendered by 
Eleanor Painter, Rose Coghlan, Paul Swan, 
Annette Kellermann, Amando Loneo 
Nora Bayes, Juliette Dika, Edgar Atchi- 
son Ely, Helen Trix, Sophye Bernard, 
Lillian Russell, Henry Stanford, Laura 
Burt, Mrs. Thomas Whiffin, J. M. Kerri- 

Si, Frank Conlin, Brandon Tynan, Lestei 
nergan, Arthur Hurley, Harry C 
Browne, Ruth Garland and Minnie Dupree 
About $1,200 was realized. 



GRACE BRYAN WINS CASE 

Grace Bryan, who secured an Injunction 
restraining Charles Rice and Marie Rice 
known as Charles Rice and Company, from 
presenting their sketch "The Spirit o! 
Preparedness," claiming it an infringe 
ment on her sketch "Preparedness," hai 
settled ont of court, granting the Bicei 
permission to present their sketch for tei 
weeks from the date ol settlement, ani 
then discontinue its presentation. 



18 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



May 2, 1917 



HARRY VON TILZER'S 

SENSATIONAL OVERNIGHT HIT! 



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You will not only be doing a patriotic duty by singing this song, but you can follow a whole show of patriotic songs and 

positively be the hit of them all. It's the right song at the right time! 



A TELEGRAM OF APPRECIATION OF A GREAT SONG FROM A GREAT ARTIST 



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NEWCOMB CARLTON. MIKaiDDCT 



RECEIVED AT 

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UNION 
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GEORGE W. E. ATKINS. nilST VICE-pncsiOENT 



Form ISO* 



CLASS OF SERVICE 


SYMBOL 


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RA BROOKLYN NY APR 30 1917. 



HARRY VON TILZER MUSIC PUB CO 

333 WEST 46 ST NEWYORK NY 

D EAR HARRY IN ALL THE YEARS I HAVE BEEN IN SHOW BUSINESS I HAVE 
NEVER HAD A SONG GO OVER WITH SUCH TERRIFIC APPLAUSE AS "THE HAN 
BEHIND THE HAMMER AND THE PLOW" I AM CLOSING MY ACT WITH THE 
SONG AND STOPPING THE SHOW AT EVERY PERFORMANCE I WANT TO THANK 
YOU FOR GIVING ME NOT ONLY A GREAT SONG BUT ONE THAT WILL DO MORE 
GOOD IN CARRYING OUT THE PRESIDENT S PROCLAMATION OF APRIL SIXTEENTH 
THAN ANY SONG NOW BEING SUNG BEFORE THE PUBLIC EVERY ACTOR OR ACTRESS 
THAT SINGS THE 80NG W^LL NOT ONLY HAVE A BIG HIT BUT WILL BE DOING 
A GREAT DUTY FOR THEIR COUNTRY* kVL KINDS OF GOOD LUCK FROM 



YOUR FRIEND 

STUART BARNES 



1030PM 



WRITE OR WIRE FOR YOUR COPY AND ORCHESTRATION IN ANY KEY 

_.-ier bij hit»: "There'. Someone More Lone«ome I"h»n You." "On the South Sea l»le." "Ju«t the Kind of I 



HARRY VON TILZER MUSIC PUBLISHING CO. 

BEN BORNSTEIN. Prof. M fl r. 222 WCSt 46th Street, New York City MEYER COHEN Bus M r. 



May 2, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



19 




RIVIERA 

• (Last Half) 

This bill was of "excellent quality, with 
a decided leaning toward musical acts. 

Kate and Wiley, working in. an attrac- 
tive special setting, opened the show, with 
some "flashy gymnastic feats.' The girl's 
work on the rope is done with-' consid- 
erable adept ness, although it is appre- 
ciated more, by. those who have not seen 
Dainty Marie. The feat, in which the. 
man hangs suspended from the .girl's 
free arm, is a great piece of business. 

Smith -and Farmer occupied the second 
spot with , songs and chatter. -They are 
a neat man and girl team and fitted nicely 
into the position. The girl sings pleas- 
ingly. The final number, in which the 
girl singB while the man -plays the cornet, 
was particularly well done, j Our grand- 
fathers heard .the joke about the nun . 
who climbed to the top of a pole to read 
a "Wet Paint" sign;- This gag has no 
place in an otherwise original act. 

Lawrence Grant and Company have a 
very timely offering in their playlet, "The 
Final Arbiter." The piece is written with 
greater finesse than a vaudevillian is ac- 
customed to finding. Furthermore, it is 
well staged and perfectly acted. Al- 
though, of course, the. .playlet is by no 
means new, the spirit of the times should 
warrant its showing on the bigger cir- 
cuits. 

Wayne and. the Warren Girls will be 
reviewed under New Acts. 

With plenty of stage assurance, well 
chosen material and a strong, vibrant 
voice, Harry Ellis found an appreciative 
audience. His lullaby yodel and ballad 
were particularly well sung and he would 
have brought down the house even with- 
out resorting to a war song as a closer. 

The show was closed by the Six Sere- 
naders, who have a most original way of 
putting over songs. The act shows good 
showmanship throughout. H. G. 



PROCTOR'S 125th ST. 

(Last Half) 

The showing of patriotic scenes in the 
"Weekly" caused the audience to applaud 
and they kept it up throughout the show 
on Thursday afternoon. This is rather 
unusual for an audience in this house. 

The opening turn was Valarie & Lloyd, 
a musical novelty act consisting of im- 
personations of well known musicians, 
done by the man. He uses the violin, 
cornet, cello and saxophone for his vari- 
ous impressions. The young woman ac- 
companies him at the piano, and, while 
he is making changes, renders a solo and 
sings a ballad. The act is a neat and 
pleasing one and should have a feature 
spot on neighborhood theatre bills. In 
the opening position, at this house, it was 
considerably handicapped. 

Lee & Lawrence, in the comedy skit, 
"The Custom Inspector and the Pas- 
senger," present an abundance of old 
u gagV which, having been heard from time 
to time by the audience, naturally made 
but little impression. 

Sully, Rogers & Sully, in a comedy 
bounding act, were in the third spot. 
Their line of work is original and sure to 
be pleasing. 

Quinn & Lafferty, a clever young cou- 
ple in songs and dances, were in the next 
spot. The dancing portion of the turn 
is the feature of the act and was well 
executed. 

Richards & Kyle, in the comedy skit, 
"His Club Night," proved to be the hit 
of the bill. The act is now thoroughly 
seasoned and there is no reason why it 
should not find its way into the bills of 
two-a-day houses in an early spot. 

Orth Sc Dooley in their comedy skit. 
"The Fool Detective," had quite a hard 
time in getting over after following the 
previous act, which had supplied whole- 
some comedy. The work of Dooley is a 

bit overdrawn, especially his falls. 

The Four Southern Girls, with their 
repertoire of Southern melodies were in 
the closing spot. H. 6. 



HARLEM OPERA HOUSE 

(Uitmif) 

A bill that, on the whole, was below 
the standard of programs offered at this 
theatre, opened with the Three Hoy Sis- 
ters, midgets with a decidedly German 
accent, which, however,' does not keep 
them from trying to sing popular Ameri- 
can numbers,- Their. dancing is decidedly 
better than their, singing, but the act is 
a Blow one, at best. The, trio. have nothing' 
much in their favor other 'than being 
extremely undersized. ' - : '* "■■■■ 

Ward. and. Curran had a very acceptable 
offering, which will be reviewed- under 
New Acts, ' ".. '. . \. . 

Gilroy, Haynea and Montgomery pre- 
sented a nonsensicality, the action of 
which transpired on hoard the "Nancy 
Lee.", The -act started with considerable 

punch, the first song number being ren- 
dered very sweetly, in excellent harmony. 
But the talk that followed dragged, and' 
the act' continued slowly until' the- last 
number* whteh was well, rendered. 

Herbert and M almrose will be , reviewed 
under 'New Acts." 

Following an episode ' of -The' Great 
Secret," the Norton Girls, held down- the J 
boards. . They will be reviewed under New 
Acts. 

John and Mae Burke walked off with 
first honors. 

Burke's funny voice won the audience 
instantly. His piano playing went even 
bigger than bis comedy, and deservedly 
so. Mae Burke is a "feeder" for John. 
Her singing voice was nil at Thursday's 
matinee, but it is likely that- a heavy 
cold had a lot to do with it. 

Sol Levoy and the audience sang a 
couple of popular numbers. 

The Irish Coleens, with Lady Agnese, 
closed the show. Their "Irish Chelidh" 
pleased the Harlemites. Irish music and 
dancing predominate in the act. Lady 
Agnese's introduction of her Coleens met 
with a warm response, and the audience 
enjoyed seeing the Irish lassies giving 
their impression of an American ragtime 
number. H. G. 



EIGHTY-FIRST ST. 

(Last Half.) 

It is quite apparent that when Manag- 
ing Director A. L. Shakman runs his 
show straight through without the inser- 
tion of a feature picture in the middle of 
the performance, the enthusiasm of the 
audience remains intact and the perform- 
ers reecive a better share of applause for 
their work. 

The opening act was The Avandos, who 
presented a musical program with xylo- 
phones and a piano. The act is nicely 
arranged and well presented. 

Frances Rice, in her impression of 
"Stage Celebrities," was in the next spot. 
Miss Rice certainly gives an artistic im- 
personation of Belle Baker, David War- 
field, Lillian Shaw, Bertha Kalish and 
Eddie Foy. None of these are a bit over- 
drawn, even, the one of "Eddie Foy," 
which, as a rule, 'proves, to be the case 
with most performers. 

Austin Webb & Co., in a comedy of con- 
science, appeared in an. act entitled "Hit 
the Trail," by John B. Hymer, which is 
reviewed under "New Acts." 

Charles Irwin and Kitty Henry, in a 
comedy skit, "Comin' Through the Rye," 
proved to be the hit of the bill. The work 
of Irwin is well done, with the possible 
exception of the "hiccoughs," which ap- 
pear to be Just a. bit overdrawn. This de- 
tail sort of grates on the audience when 
being done again and again. The act is 
original, and with this "bit" curbed some- 
what, should always prove to be a wel- 
come acquisition on any two-a-day bill. 

Gara Zora, an exponent of India's sym- 
bolic dances, was in the closing position. 
Her work consisted . of three numbers, 
"Greek Mythology." "The Mermaid 
Dance" and "The Sacrifice Dance," an of 
which were neatly executed. 

A. TJ. 



WHAT 





SAYS OF HEIt 



FIVE KINGS OF 




• ,:•■: ';.,>.' ''■££ ^^^Hm 



-E-- -v. ". '--S<2- 




"The Finest Boys, the 
Greatest Jazz Band, 
and may we all stick 
together for another 
wonderful season." 



Agent-MAX HART 

Next Week, at B. F. Keith's Riverside Theatre 



20 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



May 2, 1917 



I 

i 



IB 



MR. CHAPIN'S PRESS AGENT 

HAS L OST HIS JOB 

There Was Nothing More for Him to Say, After Mr. Chapin 

Received the Following Letters During the Two Days 

Following His Trade Showing of the Lincoln Cycle 

WITH THE EXCEPTION OF FIFE, THESE LETTERS 

ARE FROM PEOPLE NOT PERSONALLY 

KNOWN BY MR. CHAPIN 



Excellent in every detail, in- 
tensely interesting, as fine a pro- 
duction as I have ever witnessed. 
Would like to have my own coun- 
trymen see this masterpiece in my 
own city. 

(Signed) Hon. FRANK L. 
COHEN, R. H. S., 

Hotel Ansonia, N. Y. . 
Former Mayor of Glasgow, 
Scotland. 



It was a rare treat to witness 
the result of brains and culture. 
And what a result! Many big 
movie efforts dazzle with magni- 
tude, lavish expenditure of money 
and time, but here is a moving 

Jhoto Cycle that reaches the soul, 
[ere is a picture with the uni- 
versal appeal. Mother and son. 
Here is that heart interest "thing" 
that we all strive for in its sim- 
plest, purest form. Griffith, Bren- 
non, etc. all have done big things, 
but not one of them has ever 
reached the height in the moving 
picture art that Chapin stands 
upon — alone the master of heart in- 
terest appeal. H the mothers of 
men count for anything in this 
world, they will see to it that their 
sons see the Lincoln Cycle. 

(Signed) JAMES R. GAREY, 
Long Time Stage Director 
and Dramatist. 



I consider it the most perfect 
film, in conception, in discretion of 
acting, in discrimination, in selec- 
tion of incidents, in absence of the 
theatric and presence of human 
qualities and, in cumulative effect, 
that has been seenl As a docu- 
ment to stir the noblest in man and 
patriotism in the country, it de- 
serves government support. 
(Signed) MISS ADA STERLING, 

747 Madison Ave., N. Y. 

Author, Editor, Playwright, 

and Critic. 



devotion fitting the spirit of the 
hour. 

(Signed) FLOYD B. WILSON, 
Singer Building, N. Y. 
Lawyer. 



I am a constant attendant of the 
screen theatres, and these Lincoln 
features are easily the most 
touchingly beautiful pictures I 
have ever seen. The principals who 
assist you in the action have been 
wonderfully selected. Your Cycle, 
like the master composers' works, 
viU live for future generations to 
snjoy. 
(Signed) CHAS. A. DEAN, 
Imperial Hotel, 
Real Estate Developer. 

I reglr* the "Lincoln Cycle," 
without exception, the most ab- 
torbingly interesting film exhibi- 
tion I have ey er seen. Its historical 
■galni* tn thr ynnnp and old is note- 
worthy ; and its lesson of patriotic 



All art is a form of self-express- 
ton. You expressed the character 
of Mr. Lincoln through your own 
thought and feeling, hence the' 
great success of your plays. Your 
pictures are wonderful. They will 
live. 

(Signed) EDMUND J. MYERS, 
703 Carnegie Hall, 
Musician. 



Delightfully interesting and in- 
structive. Patriotic in the full 
sense of the word. A feature that 
will crowd all play houses and have 
a big and continuous run. 
(Signed) FLORENCE GERNDT, 
1144 Putnam Ave., Brooklyn. 

f Public School Teacher. 

Mrs. Burns and my daughter at- 
tended and they were loud in their 
praises of the pictures and stated 
they were the best they have ever 
seen. I consider this a great com- 
pliment, in view of the fact that 
they are both "movie fans." In- 
deed, they were effusive in their 
praises of the wonderful pictures, 
and I hope to have the pleasure 
of seeing them myself, as soon as 
you release them. 

(Signed) W. J. Burns, 
Woolworth Building. 
Burns Detective Agency. 

Admirable! You have simply 
done wonders. Please accept my 
hearty congratulations. I am much 
pleased to see good notices in the 
Tribune and the Brooklyn Eagle. 
I feel certain that the Lincoln 
Cycle is going to be a great suc- 
cess. You are rendering a great 
service, especially to the rising 
generation, particularly at this 
critical period of our national life. 
(Signed) A. EMERSON 
PALMER, 

Secy., Board of Education, 
of the City of New York, 
Park Ave. and 59th Street. 



More educational than the 
"Lives" of Lincoln I have read, and 
as inspirational as Lincoln's life. I 
hope every American boy may see 
these pictures. My wife says the 
pictures are as natural as Mr. Cha- 
pin in his impersonation. 
(Signed) SAMUEL B. LELAND, 
901 Ogden Ave., N. Y. 
Minister. 



benefit to the public if it would 

serve as a great example or type 

for other pictures. 

(Signed) MRS. ALEX. LUMLEY, 
Resident of Paris, France, 
American Address, Hotel 
Ansonia. 



The best I ever saw! 
(Signed) GEORGE GORDON 
NEEDHAM, 

218 East 19th St., N. Y. 

Physician. 

The very best moving picture I 
have ever seen. Beautifully ar- 
ranged, splendidly acted, educa- 
tional, interesting and a sublime 
mixture of pathos and comedy. 
(Signed) Frank Ferguson, 
253 West 42nd St., N. Y. 
Playwright. 



It is a very high class entertain- 
ment, worthy in every way of the 
great man it delineates. Every 
boy and girl in America should go 
to see it, and after it has gone the 
rounds of this country, it should 
be presented throughout England 
and the Continent. 
(Signed) MRS. KATE STEVENS 
BATES, 

160th St. & Edgecomb Rd., 

Social Worker. 



Your feature play of Abraham 
Lincoln was a great inspiration to 
me. I think it ranks with "The 
Birth of A Nation." I will do my 
best to advertise it in my home 
section. 

(Signed) MRS. JOSEPH H 
WALLACH. 
26 Post Ave., N. Y. 
Vice Pres. Mother's Club. 



Ideal for entertainment and in- 
struction. Put out at a timely mo- 
ment. I judge this as an exhibitor 
and a teacher of history. 

(Signed) S. LESSELBAUM, 
747 Sutter Ave., Bklyn., N. Y. 
Miller and Vermont Theatres, 
also Secy. Brooklyn Exhibi- 
tor's League. 

I have been in the habit of go- 
ing to the "movies" for some years. 
This comes near to being the best. 
A great argument for prepared- 
ness. 

(Signed) EDWARD SIMMONS, 
16 Gramercy Park, N. Y. 
Painter. 



It was the finest film I have ever 
seen! I remember President Lin- 
coln, and Tad was my playmate in 
Washington. Every American 
should see it. Hope you will take 
it to every city in the United 
States. 

(Signed) MRS. CATHARINE 
CHENOWETH, 
34 East 32nd St., N. Y. 



bodies for its instructive value and 
by the nation, for its patriotic ap- 
peal. 

(Signed) CHAS. B. GOING, 
14 West 12th St., N. Y. 
Editor, Salamagundi Club, 
140 Nassau St., N. Y. 

Compared with the usual run of 
film exhibits, yours of yesterday 
seemed to please everybody and 
was a refreshing change. _ A good 
healthful drama, an historical edu- 
cation which should be at this time 
a welcome entertainment to the 
jaded veterans of vitascope shows. 
Above all the idea is patriotic and 
stimulating. I wish you success. 
(Signed) WM. NELSON LITTLE, 

235 West 76th St., N. Y. 

Rear Admiral, U. S. Navy 

(Retired.) 

Your Lincoln photoplay is an 
epic of Democracy, and I thank 
you for the privilege of seeing it. 
(Signed) ELEANOR ROGERS 
COX, 
8 West 33rd St., N. Y. 
Author and Poet. 



I consider it a wonderful picture 
and think it would be of great 



The strongest, tenderest, most 
inspiring thing I have seen pre- 
sented in this form. A work of 
immense potential value in build- 
ing personal character and high 
patriotism, carried out in a way to 
hold young and old equally inter- 
ested and equally charmed. It 
should be taken up by educational 



They are superb. That they are 
unique goes without saying. The 
Cycle pictures should put you in 
the Wallingford class promptly. 
(Signed) MILTON NOBLES, 
139 First Place, Brooklyn* 
Actor, Playwright. 

Many times I felt like crying 
and many times the humor of it 
made me laugh. They are, as has 
been said, the most "moving" mov- 
ing-pictures. 

(Signed) ELIZABETH CHRIS- 
TIAN FOSDICK, ' 
1 West 67th St., N. Y. 



The most remarkable imper- 
sonation and representation of the 
day so far as we know. The spirit 
is in direct sympathy with the 
times. Such a characterization is 
to be commended in the highest 
terms. 

(Signed) MRS. FRED W. 
MEYER, 
468 Riverside Drive, N. Y. 



"I was most deeply impressed 
with the pictures I have seen to- 
day. As I am 72 years old, I lived 
through the war record of Lincoln 
— and you can imagine how you 
have appealed to me. In whatever 
of influence or example I can be 
of service' in extending the pub- 
licity of the pictures I saw at the 
Strand Theatre this morning, and 
of the others you propose, you may 
always command me. 

(Signed) DR. APPLETON 
MORGAN, 
University Club, 
Retired Lawyer. President, 
N. Y. Shakespeare Club. 

Your presentation of Lincoln 
and his family life is the most ten- 
der and powerful picture-drama 
before the public to-day. The "Call 
to Arms" is exceedingly timely. It 
ought to be presented everywhere 
at once. It-will do more good than 
any amount of talk in showing 
President Wilson's present difficul- 
( 



May 2, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



.21 



ties and secure sympathy for him 
in the trying times through which 
he is passing. I wish you great 
success with the Cycle. 

(Signed) WM. BREWSTER 
HUMPHREY, 

298 Manhattan Ave., 
Executive Secy. American 
Indian League. 

Fine! Wonderful! Truthful I 
Has "laughter akin to tears." Is 
the best enlistment argument be- 
fore the public to-day. Many 
thanks. 

(Signed) WILL N. HARBEN, 
854 West 181st St., N. Y. 
Author. 



I never felt so great and human, 
and never was so touched as by 
the "Lincoln Cycle." It reached 
the bottom of my heart! Every 
human being ought to see this. 
(Signed) P. BROUNOFF, 
147 West 11th St., N. Y. 
Composer and Lecturer. 

Your presentation of the Lin- 
colns, "Tom" and "Abe" the Presi- 
dent, is truly admirable, forceful 
and pregnant, and amusing to boot. 
1 predict a colossal success for the 
Cycle if the other parts are up to 
the standard of this one, and there 
doesn't seem to be any reason why 
they shouldn't. It will, by its 
homely humor and pathos get a 
grip on the public that will be 
powerful and lasting — and that 
spells success. 

(Signed) JOHN FLANAGAN, 

1931 Broadway, N, Y. 

Sculptor. 

Mighty good and a certain suc- 
cess! I liked the second, "My 
Father" particularly. Congratula- 
tions! 1 

(Signed) ADIN BALLOU, 
109 West 54th St., N. Y. 
Writer. 



delineation, real in their humanity, 
.most affecting in their tenderness, 
highly educational in their effect 
and grandly inspiriting in their les- 
sons of patriotism. They will help 
us all to lead better lives. 

(Signed) FRANK A. BRYANT, 
26 West 40th St., N. Y. 
Physician. 

I wish I could tell you of my de- 
light in your wonderful Lincoln 
Cycle. I have never seen another 
motion picture that has moved me as 
much. It is perfect in every detail. 
I feel that not to have seen it would 
have been a sad loss to me. I thank 
you from my heart. I hope that it 
will be given so often in New York 
that every American will have a 
chance to see it many times. 

(Signed) VIRGINIA TERHUNE 
VAN DE WATER, 

231 West 101st St., N. Y. 
Author. 



I thank you for the opportunity 
you afforded me in seeing the 
unique, artistic, highly interesting 
and instructive portion of the Lin- 
coln Cycle. Like the April day 
itself, it shifted and changed from 
the sunshine of humor to the tears 
of sympathy and was in each phase 
perfection itself. Your own dual- 
ity of character, both the father 
and his glorious son, was admir- 
ably depicted. 
(Signed) EDW. LAUTERBACH, 

301 West 108th St., N. Y. 

Lawyer. 

The most interesting set or se- 
ries of pictures I have ever wit- 
nessed. 

(Signed) H. F. RENDALL, 
121 West 39th St., N. Y. 
Editor Motion Picture Dept. 
New York Review. 



It was most instructive, inter- 
esting, pathetic, patriotic and 
amusing. 

(Signed) IRVING P. WHIT- 
INGTON, 
859 Seventh Ave., N. Y. 
Physician. 



page, the impression is vastly 
greater. The composition seems to 
me to be excellent. The combina- 
tion of pathos and humor is quite 
masterly. 

(Signed) GEORGE W. GIL- 
MORE, 
360 4th Ave., N. Y. 
Editor, "Homeletic Review," 
Funk & Wagnalls Co. 



I witnessed your showing of the 
Lincoln Cycle. I am still under the 
spell of its wonderful artistry. You, 
sir, have made a work of art,.subtle, 
convincing, well-balanced, with no- 
ble blending of pathos and humor. 
And best of all, the whole work is 
imbued with the spirit of sincerity 
that make of the artistic potentiali- 
ties beautiful actualities. As student 
and artist I welcome this truly 
worthy picture as one of, if not the 
finest expression of the silent drama. 
The Lincoln of memory or of im- 
agination becomes before our eyes 
the real flesh and blood Lincoln as 
of our own day and generation. 

(Signed) ARTHUR J. WEST- 
ERMAYE, 
90 Nassau St. Author. 



I wish to write to express my 
great admiration of the Lincoln pic- 
tures, and my earnest wish for the 
success of your undertaking. The 
pictures are wonderfully good from 
every point of view. 

(Signed) MORNAY WIL- 
LIAMS, 

27 Cedar St., N. Y. 
Lawyer. 



It is far more than resemblance, or 
make-up or clever acting. The real 
Lincoln seems to live again. The 
occasion was very impressive and I 
hope that the pictures may be seen 
very widely not only for their his- 
toric importance, but for the great 
message which they bring. 
(Signed) VIRGINIA ROBIE, 

29 East 29th St., N. Y. 

Artist and Author. 



The picture should be shown in 
every town and village in the country 
as quickly as possible. It is calculated 
to arouse great enthusiasm; to stir the 
people of the United States to enter 
this, the greatest of crusades — the fight 
to recover ground more holy than was 
fought for eight or nine hundred years 
ago. (Signed) 

COLIN CAMPBELL COOPER, 
222 West 59th St., N. Y. Artist 



Your pictures were perfect in 
their craftsmanship, true in their 



I was delighted with the exhibi- 
tion. In the first place, I think it is 
supremely timely in this crisis of our 
nation to have presented to Ameri- 
cans the figure of a patriot, so pa- 
tient, so human, and, with all, so 
great a statesman as Lincoln. This 
should be a mighty stimulus to 
every man, woman and child who is 
privileged to witness the pictures. 
In the second place, the educational 
value seems to me to be worthy of 
notice. I should certainly like to see 
the entire Cycle figuring in the pub- 
lic schools. Outside of the appeal 
to the eye, which impresses so much 
more than the details of the printed 



Truly a most timely, interesting and 
instructive presentation of a great sub- 
ject, with its pathetic and humorous 
veins. A brilliant and happy thought. 
(Signed) MRS. R. F. GARDNER, 
300 Lincoln Road, Brooklyn. 
Social Worker. 



I do thank you for what to me was 
a "Soul Bath." I knew Lincoln — met 
him when only a girl of fifteen. 
(Signed) MRS. CORA FARIMBURG. 

It made Lincoln a real true being to 

me and as such surpassed my ideal of 

him. (Signed) 

MRS. S. STANWOOD MENKEN, 

34 West S2d St.. N. Y. 

National Security League. 



The pictures are very interesting and 
of much historic value, and also at this 
particular time are of great service in 
arousing the loyally active co-opera- 
tion of the public with President 
Wilson. 

(Signed) W. B. PAYNE, 
131 West 10th St., N. Y. 
Educator. 



A fine piece of work and most timely. 

It deserves a great success. Wish we 

had more of this kind of pictures. 

(Signed) WHITSON L. SAVAGE, 

308 West 59th St., N. Y. 

President, Savage School 

for Physical Education. 

It will be an opportunity for the peo- 
ple of the present day to learn now 
mercilessly poor Lincoln was abused 
by the politicians and the self-seekers. 
I lived through the whole period. 

(Signed) H. L. WINGATE, 

350 West 23d St., N. Y. 



I attended your "Lincoln Cycle" at 
the Strand and think the production 
was. in every way marvelous and highly 
educational. 
(Signed) MISS W. A. LIGHTSTONE, 

879 West End Ave., N. Y. 

Principal, Riverside School. 



I witnessed the presentation of your 
Lincoln Cycle so far as it was devel- 
oped. I want to assure you of my in- 
tense interest and unqualified approval. 
I have never been gripped before as I 
was this morning, although I have 
been on the National Board of Censors 
for six years and have seen a great 
many pictures. I hardly know how_ to 
express myself. Perhaps by saying 
that the full Cycle ought to be sent 
immediately into every theatre and 
public hall in America, and it should 
be placed in every church as well. I 
should as a censor pass it without 
change and endorse it as "excellent" 
for adults and youths of every age. 
It is timely an.d belongs to the mo- 
ment. I said to a gehtleman at the 
close of the review that it showed just 
what moving pictures should be. He 
(also on the review committee) said 
he should write you a personal letter 
to that effect. I have not seen its equal 
in sincerity, patriotism, religious power 
without ostentation, and true art. I 
recall the terrible days just before the 
firing on Sumter, but no history por- 
trays that strain so powerfully as you 
have done, yet held the true Lincoln 
so strongly to his one great aim. I 
was not only charmed but was for the 
first time overwhelmed with the truth, 
the pathos, the refinement of the re- 
ligious sentiment, and the intelligent 
portrayal of that character which we 
would like to see more fully expressed 
in our daily life. Artistically in its 
setting, and photpgraphically in its de- 
velopment, it seemed unsurpassed. 
(Signed) FRED HOVEY ALLEN, 
Hotel San Remo, 146 Centra! Pk W., 
New York City. 
Member National Board of Review. 



A big boost to the "Wake-up Amer- 
ica" movement. 

(Signed) P. ROSENSON, 
740 Manhattan Ave., 
Garden Theatre, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

A most timely performance — whole- 
some, sane and inspiring! It is worth 
a hundred spoken addresses. 
(Signed) Rabbi BARNET A. ELZAS. 
42 West 72d St., N. Y. 



Very interesting, fine humor and pa- 
thos; full of human as well as histor- 
ical interest 

(Signed) STANSBURY HAGAR, 
48 Wall St. Lawyer. 

I saw only "My Father" and "Myself 
and "Call to Arms." This as an entire 
program ranks ahead of anything on 
the market today. It is the greatest 
of all American Features, not except- 
ing the "Birth of a Nation." 

(Signed) WILLIAM V. HART, 

311 West 111th St, N. Y. 

Motion Pictures. 



I regard your Lincoln Cycle as one 
of the Nation's most precious assets. 
It strikes me as a distinct advance on 
all educational and historic photoplays 
so far produced; I trust that at this 
crisis of humanity in world affairs, it 
may have simultaneous production in 
every American community. 
(Signed) 
WILLIAM HOSEA BALLOU, 

45 West 73d St., N. Y. 
Author. 



An epoch-making production. 
(Signed) MRS. LIONEL SUTRO, 
600 West End Ave., N. Y. 
National Board of Review. 



A wonderfully human and g::;.-pins 
series of pictures showing the inside 
forces which made the oul>ide man 
what he was. They brins inist even 
to the eyes of the hardened male crea- 
ture and there was a suspicious epi- 
demic of nose blowing in my vicinity 
which had nothing to do with colds 
in the head. Mr. Chapin has done a 
splendid piece of work. The artistic 
quality of the "cut ins" is particularly 
pleasing. Some of the touches are as 
ingenious as unexpected, and wholly 
delightful 

(Signed) WILLIAM B. HILLS. 

50 Madison Ave., N. Y. 

Publicity Man. 

The Lincoln Cycle is an extraor- 
dinary piece of work in its perfection. 
The acting is so natural, and one feels 
the sincerity of purpose back of it so 
fully, that one actually lives Lincoln's 
life with him; the ingenuity and skill 
with which the story is unfolded 
should put scenario writers to shame; 
the beauty of the photography is un- 
equaled by any other motion picture I 
have ever seen; and last but not least, 
the care given to detail is most gratify- 
ing to the observer after looking at 
pictures so full of inconsistencies and 
mistakes. The Lincoln Cycle is a 
masterpiece. All schools equipped 
with motion picture apparatus should 
own a copy of the film. At last a mo- 
tion picture has been made that can 
be classed as an educational picture 
without stretching the truth. I add my 
thanks to the many you will receive 
for this remarkable piece of work. 

(Signed) FLORENCE E. BATE, 

601 West 144th St. N. Y. 

Member Better Motion 

Picture Committee. 

— f,4rfr.> 



22 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



May 2, 1917 




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181 TR.EMONT ST. 

PHILADELPHIA 

BROAD and CHERRY STS. 



135 W. 44iKSt., NEWYORK 

CHICAGO, GRAND OPERA HOUSE B'L'D'G. 



ST. LOUIS 

7 th and Ol-IV-E ST, 

SAN FRANCISCO 

PANTAGES THEATRE Bldtf. 






3-JLik, 



May 2, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



23 




WAYNE & WARNER GIRLS 

Theatre — Riviera. 
Style — Musical skit. 
Tine — Nineteen minute*. 

Setting— Special. 

This trio works in two, the scene 
representing the deck of a steamer, 
with the music cabin opening out onto 
the deck. 

When the curtain rises, the trio is 
singing, the man accompanying on the 
ukelele and one of the girls at the 
piano. 

The skit almost has a plot. The man 
is engaged to Ethel, but as Ruth and 
Ethel are twins, it keeps him busy see- 
ing that he makes love to the right 
girl. There is also a sub-plot in which 
the. girls'- off -#tage- mother- re concerned. 
It serves only as a good excuse to work 
- in- the musical numbers and some - 

comedy business and dialogue. 

! The two. girls sing— a. number about* 
the perplexities', that arise out of the' 
fact that they are twins'.' A couple of 
solos- axe also, ftu Tig, ,ani a trip number., 
concludes the turn. The three' then 
sing with a ukelele accompaniment as 
an encore. 

The act is an original, wholesome and 
pleasing offering. Ruth, who tends 
towards the eccentric style of work, 
has an abundance of personality and is 
very clever. She overdoes her tripping 
business, and it is not particularly 
funny. This is an act that should 
please any audience. ' H. Q. 



NORTON GIRLS 

Theatre— Harlem Opera Boute. 
Style— SUter act. 
Time — Thirteen minute*. 
Setting— Special. 

These two girls work in a special set 
in two. It consists of a black and white 
striped conception, the stripes inter- 
woven with rose vines. The setting is 
most atractive. 

The girls open with a. duet, sung 
passably well. One of the girls then 
sings a novelty number. The other 
girl then -reappears, dressed as a boy, 
and. renders a song number. The pair 
close with a duet and dance. 

The girl in boy's costume makes a 
dashing young fellow. The "boy" has 
more stage presence and confidence than 
her partner. 

The pair need more ginger in their 
turn and a more confident air in their 
work. H. G. 



WARD & CULLAN 

Theatre — Harlem Opera Bouse. 

Style— Singing. 

Setting— In one. 

Time — Seventeen minutes. 

Jane Ward and Billy Chilian -enter, 
singing the chorus of a Dixie song with 
voices that blend very harmoniously. 
The remainder of the song numbers are 
all accompanied by Miss Ward at the 
piano, and, it might be remarked in 
passing, that she would improve the 
stage picture by sitting closer to the 
instrument so that she would not be 
forced to stoop over to reach the piano 
keys. 

Oullan sings a number about the 
tired business man and then Miss Ward 
sings a popular selection very pleas- 
ingly. This is followed by a number 
of novelty songs which Chilian renders, 
putting them over with a considerable 
punch, the one about the man who 
"won't go oat tonight" being rendered 
with a particular wallop. A song about 
Shanghai closes the turn and goes over 
big. 

The. encore rather weakens the act, 
and perhaps it would he better for the 
couple -to bow off after the Shanghai 
number, and. not respond' to ,. an encore, 
for their act is rather long anyway. 

The .pair are clever and have chosen 
their -material wisely. H. G. 



AUSTIN WEBB & CO. V 

Theatre— Eighty- first Street. 

Style — Dramatic playlet. 

Time — Vv?enty~six minutes. 

Setting — Full ttage epeoiat. 

The basic theme of this comedy of 
conscience, entitled, "Hit the Trail," is 
based - upon the' evangelistic career, of 
"Billy" Sunday. 

The story is that of an evangelist 
who' arrives in a town to - conduct his 
campaign. He preaches a sermon on 
"Conscience" and, as a result, havoc is 

. wrought throughout . the community. 
Every one seems to recall something 
that troubles their conscience, and the, 
confessions of the citizens --form ' the ' 
story of the piece. 

This act was.. to Jiase gone- into- the 
Palace simultaneous with the appear- 
ance of "Bitty" Sunday to New" York. 
The booking offices felt, however, that 
the act_.-was. -a. tress pais on Sunday,, and. 
ordered it readjusted^ What changes were 
made are! not known ; to the "reviewer, 
- but it seems as" though .references .,t 9' 
Sunday have not been eliminated. 

The act is a bit rough in spots, but 
when shaped up should prove to be an 
unusually good offering for the two-a- 
day house?. 

None of the parfs were over-played, by ' 
any of the supporting cast, which in- 
eluded William F. Granger, Kitty 
O'Connor, H. N. Dudgeon and John 
Alden. 

The playlet was staged by Al. Lewis, 
of Lewis & Gordon. A. TJ. 



HERBERT AND MALMROSE 

Theatre— Harlem Opera Boute. 
Style— Playlet.. 

Time — Eleven minutes. 
Setting— Special. 

This act opens in a hotel lobby with 
a large window in back through which 
can be seen a snowy country landscape. 

A man and' a woman eater. Although 
strangers, they start to exchange 
pleasantries. He complains about the 
town and she listens more or less sym- 
pathetically to his talk. He tells her his 
line of business, after which she intro- 
duces herself as the salesmanager of a 
rival concern. She offers him a con- 
temptible business proposition, which he 
is big enough to spurn. She tells him 
that she was only testing him and that 
she ia not the. person whom she has 
represented herself to be but the 
daughter of his customer. She 
promises that her dad will give him an 
order for a big bill of goods and hints 
that her father might- have a propo- 
sition to make the younger fellow 
which will keep him in the town. 

They leave for the store together as, 
through the window, a train can be 
seen going over the snowy hills. 

The final scene is pretty, but the play 
is extremely weak. H. G. 

LUISE DE FOGIE 

Style — Singing comedienne. 
Setting — In one. 
Time — Fourteen minute*. 
Theatre — Avenue, Chicago. 

Luise de Fogie, as a single, stopped 
the opening show of the second-half in 
her old, familiar style. 

She enters in the garb of a red cross 
nurse and explains her mission, which, 
she states, ia to please, in rhyme. She 
then makes a quick change and delivers 
five songs; - displaying a wide range of 
versatility. Her comedy patter, which 
accompanies the songs from time to time, 
was heartily received. 

Most of her songs bear publishers' 
imprints, but she sings them in a way 
that makes them sound like especially- 
written .material. Her gowns are gor- 
geous and in keening with song, interpre- 
tations. Her act ia veil-arranged and 
pleases throughout. It is of sufficient 
value to be -welcome Jn many places 
where "singles dare to tread." C. N. 



B.F. Keith's Circuit of Theatres 

A. PAUL, KS1TH. Pwileial. BVP. AUU vw-rw * Ota. Mgr. 

UNITED BOOKING 



YOU CAN BOOK DIRECT BY 
ADDRESSING S. K. HODGDON, 
Booking Manager of the UNITED 



OFFICES 



B. F. Keith's Palace Theatre Building 

v NEW YbRtCltY 




rises 



.General Executive Offices 
Putnam Building, Times Square, New York 



JOSEPH M. SCHENCK 

General Booking Manager 



Mr. Science Personally Interviews Artists Daily Between 11 sad 1 



Chicago Office: North Asurieaa Bunding 
FRANK Q. DOYLE, ia charge 



Beaton Office: Tremont Theatre BaSdtag 
FRED MARDO, ia charge 



Acta laying off in Southern territory win this office. 



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W. S. CLEVELAND 

Wants The Best In Vaudeville 



Suite 2SS, Ordwer Bid,, 2S7 Market St. NEWARK. NEW JERSEY. 



PHONE ■ MARKET 



WANTED AT ALL TIMES 

BURLESQUE PEOPLE 



CHAS. H. WALDRON 



Waldron's Casino, Boston, Mass. 



\EW HOTEL WARNER 

(EUROPEAN) 

Cottage Grove Avenue and 33rd Street, Chicago 

TVUpfaone Douglas 673 

. F. BURT CARR, President and Maaeeer 

(Tormerlj with Victoria. Wellington sod Morrison Hotels) 

THEATRICAL PATRONAGE DESIRED 

330 Cratmtit Booms. 300 Prirate Bath.. Boom, with Print* Bath. 11.00 per day Sod upwards. BpedSl 

Weakb- aae Permanent Bates. FIBEPBOOr. EXCELLENT CATS. POPULAR PBICBB. 



24 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



May 2, 1917 



EARL LINDSAY 

and 

PHYSIOC & STORY 

ROOM 810, 1482 BROADWAY, NEW YORK 
Have immediate engagements for competent principals and chorus girl* for Productions, Vaudeville 

Revues and Pictures. 



CLAIRE VINCENT & CO. 

Offering 

"Tlie Recoil" 

By RICHARD WARNER 

DESIRES TO SINCERELY THANK THE UNITED BOOKING OFFICES AND ORPHEUM CIR- 
CUIT FOR THE TWO PAST ENJOYABLE SEASONS. 

DIRECTION-ARTHUR KLEIN 



A NEW PATRIOTIC SONG. A THRILLING WAR SONG, A THRILLING WAR SONG 

"THE SWEETHEART OF THE U. S. A. 



Professional Copies to Recognized Singers 



I.E' ItATEL) TO 1" O . S .""OK A 

W. HENRY PEASE PUBLISHING CO., MOUNT VERNON, N. Y. 



phiHp AUSTIN & BAILEY Leo 



IN "A SYNCOPATED HOTEL' 



DIRECTION PETE MACK 



The World's greatest ■nim»l impersonator at your service, address 

care of Clipper 



IVlarK Levy Presents 

STANLEY and BURNS 

Two Jolly Bachelors Booked Solid 



A HOLIDAY IN DIXIELAND 



lO— PEOPLE— lO 

WITH 



Will MASTIN and Virple RICHARDS 



In a Cyclonic Bunt of Mirth. Melody and Ductal 

Direction HARRY A. SHEA 



EARY & EARY 



WHIRLWIND NOVELTY GYMNASTS 



NEW TO THE EAST 



MARY L. MAXFIELD 

Little Miss Personality 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



ROBERTS 



CLINTON 



WILLIAMS & TAYLOR 

Singing, Dancing and Talking 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



ORIGINAL 



COLONIAL TRIO 



MAUD KELLY 

HarpUt 



Featuring 

MARTIN KEARY 

DIRECTION ™ACK SHEA 



KATHRIN HULLING 



JOSEPHINE LENHART 



The Diminutive Songster 



IN VAUDEVIUJ 



May 2, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



25 



Clij»£»< 




la ardar to avoid itotah— and to tneura tha prsauut dalrrery erf tha letters ailiillaad 
am this list, a POSTAL CARD moat ba seat iwajseasttnur oa to forward waenr letter. It sol 
ha tisaad with your full nana and tfaa iillim ta which tfaa lattar la to bo •ant, and the 
Ume at Imslnees followed by tfao aendai should ba manrloaert 

tion tfaa data (or number) of tha CLIPPER ta which tha lattan sent far 



Byrts*, JOBS 
Bojle, Jack 

BlTOOel, El 

Bums, Wul 
Brasre, J. C. 

Beach, mil * 
Carey. Jos. 

Curax. Joe 

Cdcu, Croon 
Da Leon. Fraak 
C 



AUlborjje. Ull7 
BlUOU, kterjorle 

Bullfr, Leoore 
Bert. Stella 

But. «a C 
Rrxd. Mn. VRd 
BUlr, BSliItJ 
Cooler, Adelaide 



Dovd. Fanl 
De Volt. Dire 
DeiU 

DcArbom Prod. 

s 

Donalaon, Botat 

DnDVurtn, Fred 
DranrVld. Ton 
Elite. Graham 
EuSuik). Puij 
Florcr, Geo. 
Frailer, Jack 
Hum, Jaa. ft 



CamrJall. Ha. 

Liroy 
Dt". Emny 
Freaer. Miss E. 

E 
Fuller. Eaiiibrta 
Gordon, Mm. K. 

W. 



GENTLEMEN 

Tlium Link. H. F. Nonduwa. A. P. 

Hcpler. Qui. Laferty. (hint Ort, F. 

Hamilton, Jaa. McNamare, P. I. RoseUas. Tba S 

Hanlltj. J. B. McFenra. B. B. Busatll. Clifford 

Hampton. BoskII Mirier, N. C. Beroolos. Frauds 

Hodjs, 0. r. i Mortoo. Wade L. T. 

Benneoo. Hairy Mllltr, Fred P. Boot*. H. C. 

Ham. Geo. F, Marino 4 Rich Randall. Otto D. 

I ma. B. Mickey. Oeo. D. Booty, Howard C 

Larden. Hairy HaeMnieo. Dob- Saloey. J. 

Light. Herbert aid Shobert Mo 

Uat. B. H. . Neehart. ttaa. Baal]. Wn. B. 

Lanbro, Cbaa. E. Sunn, J. L. 



LADIES 



Harris. Pauline 
Hares, Gertrude 
Harlow. Dot 
Hoar. Both 
Hoar. Liaartte 
Heldell. Asoa 
Bess. Helen 
Ballet. Hail* 8. 
Leleb. Mabel 



Le Feire, Anna 
UiTitt, Jeanettc 

W. 
LodTer. Hn. L. 
Milton, Hand 
Marlon. Boor 
Mar. Ethel 
McCarthy. Marrle 
Miller, Doris 



Mott. Grayea 
McMasni, Edith 
Paul. Madta 
Hoberti. Edna 
Boa*]], MM L. 
Bar, Kalurrn 

Bobesoo, Elba 
S nebt, Alice 
Seynore, Grace 



Schloes. Iniaf J. 
Sheridan. 1. 1. 
Trtplett. C. Don 

Toobey, Barke 
Vtaal. Bdrar A. 
Welti, darenee 
WOUaoi, Scon 

Ward, Frank 
Williamson, 
Frank B. 
WUtcSst. Edv. 
Watte, BlDr E. 
Winston, Walter 



Sawyer, Mn. J. 

w. 
Vincent, Caen 

(4c doe) 
Wayne, auutern 
Wheeler. NdHa 
Wain. Grate 
Wise, Aldeeh 



McALESTER TO HAVE AIRDOME 
McAlester, Okla., April 27. — The Mc- 
Alester Theatre Co. has leased ground and 
will build a new Airdome with a seatinc 
capacity of 1,500. The Airdome . will 
house moving pictures, stock, musical 
comedy and tabloid. A. C. King, man- 
ager of the Busby and Yale-Majestic 
Theatres, will be manager. 

| DEATHS | 

JOE NATUS, Old time minstrel man and 
famous tenor soloist, died April 21 at the 
County Hospital. Rome. N. T., after a 
brief Illness. Mr. Natus had been connected 
With Haverly'S, Primrose and "West, Lew 
Docksta.der'B and Al G. Field's minstrels at 
different times. He had been with Charles 
Hoyt's "A Bunch of Keys." and had also 
sung for the old Edison Phonograph Co. 

MAY BROWNING, In private life Mrs. 
John Baker, and known in vaudeville as 
one of the team of Browning Sisters, died 
recently at her home in Baltimore from 
a complication of diseases. Mrs. Baker 
started her theatrical career when eleven 
years of age as a bareback rider with the 
W. W. Cole Circus, and followed that pro- 
fession for many years. Later, she en- 
tered vaudeville with her daughter, Eva 
Browning (Mrs. Harry La Reane), consti- 
tuting; the team of the Browning Slaters. 
She had also appeared In dramatic com- 
panies, burlesque and musical comedy. 

MRS. GEORGE S. KNIGHT (Sophie 
Worrell), one of the famous Worrell Sisters 
of a generation back, died April 11 at her 
late residence in New Orleans. She had 
a long and interesting career, having 
played all over the United States, Canada, 
England. Scotland and Ireland. She was 
the original Grand Duchess and LaBelle 
Helen, in English, and was the first to 
sing "Mavourneen" in English. Some years 
after the death of George S. Knight, she 
married Hugh A. O'Donnell, a Journalist. 

PRINCESS VICTORIA, also known as 

Midjjct Melba. the tiniest Woman Of the 

stage, died April 25 at tne Stern Hospital, 
at the age of twenty years. Her real name 
was Sylvia WlUes and she was born in 
Melbourne, Australia, where she started 
her stage career under the name of Little 
Sylvia. She stood 25 H Inches high and . 
weighed 1954 pounds. In 1911 she came 
to this country and had a successful tour 
under the management of Charles Abra- 
hams, who was killed in a motor accident 
two years later. Up to several weeks ago 
she appeared In vaudeville. 

ED VINTON, who. with his trained dog. 
Buster, constituted the vaudeville team of 
Vinton and Buster, dropped dead Monday 
night, April 23 on the stage of the Temple 
Theatre. Detroit, while a crowded house 
was applauding at the end of the turn. 
Frank Panko, stage manager, seeing 
something was wrong, stepped from the 
-wings and carried Vinton off the Stage. 
Death was due to heart disease. "Vinton 
was about fifty years old and was born In 
Detroit, in the neighborhood of Bates and 
Lamed Streets. He had been In the show 
business from early childhood. He Joined 
• circus when a boy and later entered the 
vaudeville field with an animal act. 

MARION GRAY HASSAN, who was 
prominent in emotional roles forty years 
ago. died recently at her borne in Silver 
Sands. Conn. 

CHARLEY WHITE, who has been re- 
cently at the Actors' Home, at the Bruns- 
wick House, and In various hospitals, and 
who was lately sent to the home of his 
sister, at Madison, I1L, died on April 21 
and was buried there by the Actors' Fund. 



SPANISH COMPANY OPENS 

A company of professional Spanish 
singers opened Friday night at the Garden 
Theatre, presenting the opera "La Tem- 
pestad." Fernando L. Cabello headed the 
company. Three short operettas were given 
at the Saturday matinee and "La Tem- 
pestad" was repeated in the evening. It Is 
their intention to establish a Spanish the- 
atre in this city. 



ALICE HENIGER RAPS VAUDE. 

Pittsburgh, April 28. — Before the 
Drama League Convention in session here 
last week Alice Minnie Herts Heniger, of 
the Children's Educational Theatre of 
New York, said that vaudeville fed its 
patrons with the wrong dramatic motives, 
increasing the business of dance halls, and 
doing a big share towards filling the 
prisons. 



"YEAR OF TIGER" PRODUCED 

Boston, April 28. — "The Year of the 
Tiger," the Harvard prize play, was pro- 
duced Tuesday night by John Craig at 
the Castle Square Theatre, and local 
critics were unanimous in their praise. 
Josephine Victor portrayed the leading 
role. 



VIOLET VANBRUGH WINS SUIT 
London, Eng., April 28. — In the Divorce 
Court yesterday Violet Vanbragh was 
granted a decree for restitution of con- 
jugal rights against Arthur Bonrchier. 
The petition of the plaintiff was on- 
defended. 



PLAYERS ENGAGED 



Helen Lowell by Edgar MacGregor for 
"Friend Martha." 

Marjorie Gateson by the Shuberts for 
"Her Soldier Boy." 

Arthur Dillingham by F. O. Whitney 
for "When Johnny Comes Marchine 
Home." 

Vera Myers by F. Ray Comstock and 
William Elliott for special "Oh Boy" com- 
pany. 

Fred Eric, David Higgins and Arthur 
Albertson by the Messrs. Shnbert for "The 
Charmed Bird." 

Sam Ash, Teddy Webb, Stanley Forde, 
Lawrence Cameron and J. M. Sylvester by 
the Shuberts for "The Highwayman." 

Edonard Durand, Mabel Brownell. Clif- 
ford Stork, Leonard Ide, and Foxhall 
Daingerfield by the. Shuberts for "The 
Eyes of Youth." 




ALBOLENE 

M |Wsaa Jk»» Coffins. heiPhmamtr. 

Ceo. Verrtsoa aafl a fcoit ofoditr Han of 

oVt etaac "sis* i 



They »y that it "is the best preparation 
for removing all kinds of tnmrricsl 
make-up" and that "it leaves the skin 
soft, smooth and free from irritation." 



l is pot up in s and a ounce I 

to fie the make-up box: also in *r and x U>. 
rani. It msy be had of man druggists and 

dcWaianuL-up. SampUfret en rtfmtf. 

McKESSON & ROBBINS 

IncofpcnitM 

SI Mass Street New York 



THE NEW HOME OF 

BUSCH & WINZElBliRG CO. 

Theatrical 
Costumes 

125 West 43d St, New York 



Maximum of quality and minimum of 
• price. The largest and mott success- 
full producers are our reference!. 

Spat isl attention paid to Acts as 

well si Productions 

Tel 7486 Bryant EttabHshed 106 

Consul t bs before nlactna" jrocnr orders 



Natalia and Ferrari's 

RUSSIAN CONSERVATORY 
OF DANCING 

Regular course for beginners and teachers. 

Auditorium Theatre Bide. 

Studio 11. Chicago 




fart for SO jean ar Stan of tea Fra reaoa a, L 
tar fret exosa saaslca, fjaaemasj KEYEB. 
teat. 1 8 88] 1-3 B. 13 la St.. Hew Tort 



LEON A. BEREZNIAK 

Lawer to tne Profession 
Ben to notify nil masy meson u»t ne ban 

moved his offices In Cnlcago from 100 West Mon- 
roe street to the First National Bank Baudlng, 
10 West sfonroe Street, Salt* 18«7-«»-M, where 
be bis much enlarged facilities nod win be 
pleased to see or bear from bis friends. 



THEATRES AND PRODUCTIONS, 
VAUDEVILLE ACTS EQUIPPED 

Now and Second Hand "lioness ta Stock 

MURRAY HILL SCENIC STUDIO 

Columbia Theatre Bldx-, 4Tth * Broadway 
Tel. Bryant 1243 Tom Creamer. Mar. 



Wanted for Next Season 

Chorus ladles for 
THE BEEF TRUST 
a h» amaU Glrta far the 
UNITED STATE! BEAUTIES 
Also wast good feature acta, and people la all 
Unas of Barleacrae, Address HTXLT WATBOJT, 
Orpssaaa XkaSBa, Pataraon, w, j. 



30c— BIG BUNCH— 30c 



IRENE LEONARD TO REMAIN 

Irene Leonard, who has been acting aa 
understudy for two of the important roles 
in "Colonel Newcome," will not accompany 
Sir Herbert Tree and the members of the 
"Colonel Newcome" company when they 
return to England at the conclusion of 
the engagement at the New Amsterdam 
Theatre. 



WANTED AT ONCE 

Advance Agent, to join on wire, that CBD wild 
Cat. Incompetent* and UMiscrs closed without 
notice. That's tbe cause of tbls ad. Useful Tom 
people with speclaltle*. Write DERNARO Mc- 
GKAW, Msnaaquan. New Jersey. . I 

P. S. James Crosan. wire. 

„ J?EP; V.\^ B'WAYAtsaar. sn.i.n. 

COHAN'S *»*■ WS* * Bat. 2.15. 
POSITIVE!.* LAST WEEK. 

RUTH CHATTERTON 

and Compear. 030104010? Braea afeataa. ta 

"COME OUT OP THE KITCHEN'' 

afoaday, Kay 7— "Oat BJoh Quick WalUn*foH." 



LIBERTY 



W. 424 Bt. Bros. 8.15. Mate. 

Wed. and Saturday 2.13. 
Jobs Haaos. Irene Paawick, Helen Wars, atathSde 
Cottrellr, Helen Lowell. Blonard Bennett, Law 
Fields. Willis P. oweataam, la 

"BOSOM FRIENDS" 

By raajTS XA1TBEX,. 

NEW M0R0SC0 THEATRE 

48th BT. , Jast W. of B' way. PboM Errant at*. 

arras. B.1*. Hats. Wed. sad Smt. S.1B. 
OttT«r atereaoe'a Greet Xaalaal laTBS with 



CANARY COTTAGE 

wTTH nrm maun*. 

Charles Safwlea sad Sarkart OorttieU 

FLTINCF THEATRE W. «d St aTra. at S.B0 
■teblirtVli uata. W«d. * Sat, 

8ELWTH & CO. PRESENT 

JANE COWL 

in "LILAC TIME" 
GAIETY 



of Acta. Case, Parodies, etc. 
ante*! OataloB for atamp. 
" it,, ~ 



Money Back Onar- 
XauaT THAYZE, 



THEATRE, B'way A 4Sn> 
St. Brae, at 8.30. UiU 
Wad. A Sat. at 2.50. 
WTHOBZIX BlflTH sxd JOHN I_ GOLDEN 
Present the season's auecaea 

TIRN T O THE RIGHT 

TH EATRE. W. «2rd St. 
ETenlocs at 8.15. Matinees 
Wednesday A Saturday 2.15. 
Messrs. Shnbert pretest 
a dramatisation of Georre dn Maurier'i novel 

PETER IBBETSON 

with John Barrymors, Cosstancs Collier, Laura 
Hope Crows, Lionel Bat r j mo rs. 

'way a sntb 
at 8 JO. Mala. 
Sit, 3.70. 

Maaaasra 



REPUBUC 



RNIOifilBOCKfR «.? 



Klaw ft Erlassar 



GEORGE ARLISS 



la Ma rreatast anoaass 



** 



»» 



Cohan & Harris ^ A -- 



EvaaLjUO. Mata. Wsd. ft Bat. at US. 
OO BftaT aUTS BAAJUS prsswat 

"THE WILLOW TREE 

A t ANT AST OT JAP AH. 
By Bearlsio asd Barrhwa aUofaa, 



» 



B. F. KEITH'S 

PALACE 

Broadway ft «Tta St. 

Mat. Dally at * P. at 

25. SO sad 75c. 

Every Right 

2S-H0-TM1-S1-B0. 



SAM BEBJfAED, HOW- 
ASS ft CLARK. DOYLE 
* DIXON. MONTGOM- 
ERY ft PERRY, NINA 
PATNE, stoXAT ft AX- 

SINE, GEOBOE LYONS, 
SEBBEBI'S BOOB, PAL- 
ACE PICTOalAL. 



AOafs^aA'aP West 4Jtb St.. Pnone Bryant 4V. 

LUKl ■"■ st 8.20. Mau. Wed. ft Bat. 

^"'^' mm '* 1.20. Ollrer Moroaco'c fTaat 

IS UBhti aj aoccaaa. Seaaoo'o One Snnetantlal aneeeao 

UPSTAIRS* DOWN 

BY FKEPEsUC ft FAWNY HATTON 

THEATRE, WEST 4«tb BT. 
frraa. at S.80. Mats. WaB. ft 
Bet- iSS 
J. rBXD PlQaTlalAaT Imtn 



FULTON 



COUBTENAY WISE 

PALS FIRST &&„, 



16 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



May 2, 1917 



JEAN ADAIR 



IN 



"Maggie Taylor— Waitress" 

Direction L-wia St CnUn 



FRANK STANLEY 



IN 



"Where's The Finish" 



Representative 
BERT GOLDBERG 



DIRECT FROM 
THE NUT FACTORY 




DtoMtiM HARRY WEBER 



FLYING MISSILE EXPERTS 
AND BOOMERANG THROWERS 

Book-dSolid 
u. b. o.— mg this 



Stuart Barnes 



Diractfcm JA3. E. FLUNUTT 



EDNA WINSTON TRIO 

NOW PLAYING U. B. O. TIME 



DIRECTION CHARLES BORNHAUPT 



EMMA STEPHENS 

BOOKED SOLID DIRECTION HARRY FITZGERALD 



DAINTY MARIE 

VENUS OF THE AIR 

Wllhu Id Bw Known b> Futura Undar H«r Own Nam. 

(DAINTY) MARIE MEEKER 



DIRECTION PAT CASEY 



MAX HART PRESENTS 

THE 



Val 
In "OH, BRAZIL" 



Ernie 



NEXT WEEK 
KEITH'S WASHINGTON 



The Yaltos 



Dainty Dancing Duo 

DIRECTION GENE HUGHES. DIG. AND JO. PAIGE SMITH 



BUD WALKER 

Managers take notice: He's always on Broadway 

He looks tike AL Jolson DIRECTION— JACK MeGANN 



EDDIE VINE 

In "A Study in Songs" 



RUTH and BOD 



The Musical Act With a Punch 

JACK FLYNN. REPRESENTATIVE 



NOLAN and NOLAN 

JESTING JUGGLERS 

Direction NORMAN JEFFRIES 



SUPREME NEW OPERATIC OFFERING 

m DOREE'S CELEBRITIES 



Direction STOKER A. BIERBAUER 



CAMILLE personi 

THE "BUTTERFLY GIRL" OF VAUDEVILLE 



HARRY PEASE 

"The American Entertainer" 

IN VAUDEVILLE BOOKED SOLID U. B. O 



ED. P. REYNARD 
MLLE. 



Bl ANC A 

In • Sarta. af DiuuUc 
Due* Fwma. 



MU.E. BIANCA 
ED. F. 



REYNARD 

Tb. VaHtwU Coaadha, 
fa "BEFORE THE COURT." 



MARGARET YOUNG 



DIRECTION MAX HART 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



JACK 



NELLIE 



ORBEIN and DIXIE 

In Southern Songs and Dances 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



TANEAN BROS 



Woek April », Lowe.. Billtatn; May 7. S, t, ModJe.ka, AujujU, C; 
M , T It, 11, 12, C. O. H-. Atlanta. C; Maw 14, U, It, BIJou, BIrmlM»h«m, 

Ala.; Mar ". .«» "». Lyceum. Mwmpfau. .Term.; w«k a, McVlckan, 
ChJco; Wwak 3, Orpbaum, Dwtreitt Waak Jaw 4, Mil.., Cl.vc.Und. 



May 2, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



27 



BIG BUSINESS FOR TAB. SHOW 

Axabuja, Tex... April 28.— The . Elmer 
McDonald Musical Revue Co. played to 
packed bouses here for two weeks and was 
acclaimed by the press and public -to be 
the cleverest and best singing tab' show 
ever seen here. The show includes : Jimmy 
Gallagher, Mort Moran, "Happy" Jim 
Bonham, Elmer McDonald, Mona Morrell, 
Bell Lloyd, Ada Foley, Corrinne Harris 
and six dancing girls. The company is 
booked solid over the Barbour Circuit. 



VAUDEVILUANS ENTERTAIN 
Springfield, Mass., April 27. — The an- 
nual beefsteak dinner of the Bela Grotto 
V. P. O. E. R. was held Friday evening 
at the Highland Hotel here. Following 
the banquet the three hundred members 
were entertained by "The Serenaders," 
Miss Brown, Three Ruby Girls and Sully 
and Arnold, all vaudevillians playing here. 



PLAN TWO FRENCH THEATRES 

Lucien Bonbeur, who has severed his 
connections with the Theatre Francais 
des Etats-Unls, is seeking a theatre in 
which to present French drama. It is 
likely he will have a rival, as Jacques 
Copeau will most likely accept the direc- 
torship of the Theatre Francais and will 
present French plays at the Oarrick. 



DANCER LEFT $25,000 

Catherine Glaser, a dancer, was left 
$25,000 by "Diamond Jim" Brady in .his 
will, just filed. She is known on the 
stage aa Kitty Glaser, and was frequently 
a guest of Brady at dances and dinner 
parties. She expressed surprise when she 
was informed of the bequest. 

COMSTOCK SIGNS BEAUTY 

Justine Johnstone has signed a con- 
tract for three years to continue under the 
management and direction of F. Ray Corn- 
stock and William Elliott, and will be 
seen In each of the Princess Theatre 
musical comedy offerings during the next 
three seasons. 



BALLET STAR HAS ACT 

Albertina Rasch, of the Metropolitan 
Opera Company, has begun the produc- 
tion of an elaborate vaudeville act in 
which she will be featured. It will see the 
variety boards within three or (our weeks. 



TALBOT WITH MILLER 

Hayden Talbot leaves for San Fran- 
cisco soon to handle the advance and 
publicity work for Henry Miler and Ruth 
Cbatterdon, during their engagement on 
the coast this summer. 



DIVA SUING BARITONE 

Mile. Elvira Amazar, a grand opera 
soprano, who has appeared with the Boa- 
ton National Grand Opera Co., ia suing 
George Baklanoff, Russian baritone, for 
$25,000 for an alleged attack in a private 
car. 



NEGROES PRESENT NEGRO PLAY 

"Rachel," a play of negro life, by Ange- 
lina Grimke, was presented last Friday 
night at the Neighborhood Playhouse by a 
company of negro players from Washing- 
ton. 



MISS COLLIER TO PRODUCE 

The European rights to J. N. Raphael's 
dramatization of Du Manrier's "Peter lb- 
bertson" have been secured by Constance 
Collier, who will present it in London 
after the war. 



WIFE SUES OPERA CONDUCTOR 

Georgio Polacco, chief conductor of 
Italian opera at the Metropolitan Opera 
House, is being sued for divorce by his 
wife, Clothilde Polacco. 



VEIIXER COMPLETING NEW PLAY 

Bayard Veiller is completing a new play 
which William Etarra, Jr., will produce 
next season. The piece will be tried out 
in Atlantic City in July. . . 



"FRIEND MARTHA" NEXT SEASON 

Edgar MacGregor plana to present 
"Friend Martha" on Broadway early next 
season. 



THE TWO STARS 

ROCKWELL 



Af4D 



WOOD 

LATE OF 
The Milky Way 



MERCEDES 



ALVIN and 

ANDY 

WILLIAMS 

Bits from Songland 

Bijou, PkilaxUlhia, April 19-21 
81st Thc.tr- April 23-28 
Palace. Newark, N. J , April 26-28 
Direction NORMAN JEFFBUES 



THE 

NAGYFYS 



Pyrotechnical Novelty 

Dtr^Uoo AW, T. WUtoo .. _ 



DIKE 



LEWIS 



THOMAS & CRADDOCK 



Singing, Talking and Comedy 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



jas. a 



STANFORD 



ROBINSON and McKISSICK 



DIRECTION MAX OBENDORF 



THERESA L. MARTIN 



In Vaudeville 

N. V. A. 



AGENTS, LOOK US OVER 

XI1VI 1VIONS and EDDY 

BACK IN TOWN . 

Refined Singing, Violin and Piano 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



WILLIAM 



EDNA 



EDMUNDS ■*«— ~~-r — LEEDOM 
GOING TO THE WEDDING 



ALWAYS WORKING. I mi lir why* 



MAX GORDON 



THE NOVELTY FOUR 

Slim, Elmer, Cy and Heinie send a Hello to their friend*. 

DIRECTION HARK LEVY 



Buhla pearl 

A aSaufean (Jpol on any Sill 
Sourfasg Conn «lrrutl airrrtlon jRarfc Cng 



Mabel Harper 

The Funbeam of Vaudeville ELSIE WEBER at the Plan* 



SLAYMANALI 

•» Producer of tl 

ORIENTAL NOVELTIES 

714 Ufa A«e, N.w Yatfc 

Phone Bryant 8950 



PAUL DURAND 

Presents 

The = 

Van Sisters 

; Dainty vocal an J instrumental 
"artiata, , featuring Ch r jstia Van, the 
-greatest living grH oern'atiaL 



Sh. 'US *•:<..!• 



JOHNNY 

lets 

frem tkm Strath. 



CORA. 

DIRECTION SAM SHANNON 



ROBERTS, STUART and ROBERTS 

FROLICS OF 1016-17 



BOOKED SOUD-LOEW CIRCUIT 



REP. 9AM BAERWITX 



JACK 



MATT 



CAMPBELL & MEEKER 



IN VAUDEVILL' 



EUGENE EMMETT & CO. 

In the Rural Musical Comedy, "TOWN HALL FOLLIES" 

RAYMOND FRAZIER, Fraacsjal 

EMILIE SISTERS SRsL 



ETHEL MAE BARKER 

"KUBEL0C IN PETTICOATS" - 

LINTON and WATSON 



Talktag Act, ralMlsal ." 

She Auto Know" 



28 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



May 2, 1917 



Featuring Hawaiian String Quartet 

BIRLINGTON FOUR! 



i 
P ! "77 In *«HokeIr^vIlIe» , 

PERSONAL DIRECTION ARTHUR KLEIN 



,oA& 




Assisted by FLOR D'ALIZA 
Presentinj- Their Wonderful Roosters 
Chat. Bornhaupt Keep* Them Crowing. 



JACK M. SYDNEY 

Versatile Entertainer Singing and Comedy 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



BULLY 



BETTY 



KIMBALL and KENNETH 

Noveliy Banjo Entertainers. Originators of Hawaiian Sted Banjo, 

Playing Loew Time Direction Mark Le-ry 



HARRY 



DOROTHY 



FABER m TAYLOR 



U. B. O. 



In "GOING NORTH" 



W. V. M. A. 



ABSLAM SHARIFF 

THE LATEST MUSICAL REVIEWS 

20— PEOPLE— 20 

Send in open time per route. Direction MARK MONROE. Putnam Bldg.. N. Y. 



Vlvta 



Bert 



Lawrence. Daly and Lawrence 

COMEDY— SINGING AND DANCING ACT 

IN VAUDEVILLE ADDRESS— CLIPPER 



ANNA MAE COONEY 

AND 

DELLA COONEY 



ALWAYS WORKING 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



C. H. HASKELL, Mgr. — IDA BUTLER— SAM dLLETTl HARMONY SINGING 

inmm THE F ry E MARTELLS "ISSar 

WEEHAWKEN, P. P., N. J. .__ 



ED 

AND 

IRENE 



LOWRY -**«* 

^■""•" ^""a*^ w v ■*■ ^"» •*■■ BY TOMMY ORA'' 



." 



BY TOMMY CRAY 



AGENTS. LOOK US OVER 



BOSAN and 

of Ham 



SINGING, DANCING MUSIC 
AND COMEDY, IN VAUDEVILLE 



PAUL, LE VAN & DOBBS 



ACROBATIC COMEDIANS IN VAUDEVILLE 



THREE LADIES 



ONE MAN 



NOVELTY AERIAUSTS 



Direction MR. BORNHAUPT 



DANCING VIOLINIST 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



Beatrice McKenzie 

in a Singing Novelty Assisted by RAYE DUNN 

Direction FRANK EVANS 




VERCE & VERCI 



20th Century Elopement 



Direction near A CURTIS 



WILLIAM WAHLE 

Manager Olympic Theatre 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 



ADELAIDE CONLEY 

REFINED SINGING 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



EDDIE 



DOLLY 



DOLLY& LEWIIM 



IN A 

School, Fool and a Flirt 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



ELEANOR FISHER 



IN VAUDEVILLE 




BILLY NEWELL i ELSA MOST 



With MENLO MOORE 



W. V. M. A. 



U. B. O. 



SAM 



I 



LAURA 



& WALK 



A Lesson in Dancing Norman Jeff* 



THE 



In "THE ASTRONOMER'S 

MARTIANS dreamofmars " 



Special Scenery. Everything OrlalaaL 



ALL GIRLS 



Darling Saxophone Four 



DIRECTION MARK LEVY 



RUSSELL, GREENE and JONES 

Singing — Acrobatic — Dancing 

Di VAUDEVILLE 



-V.RD and OR 

IN ''THE JUGGLER'S DREAM" 

BOOKED SOLID. SAM BAERWTTZ. 



May 2, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



29 



u. b. o. CIRCUIT 

MEW TOBK CITY. 

Palace — Bddle Foy & Family — Lawrie Bronson — 
Doyle A Dixon — Amoia — Howard & Clark. 

Colonial — Bernard & Janla — Seven Bracks — Dan 
Bnrke A Glrla — Sallle Fisher A Co. — Bee Ho Gray 
A Co. — La Bergere. 

Royal — Harry Von Fonen — The Levolos— Dyer 
A Fay— Rock A White— Carlisle Ac Eomer— Jesel 
* Marltn — Dougherty A Lucey. 

AUuunbra — Bnll A Durkln— American Comedy 
Fonx — Weleh'a Mlnatrela — Nlghtona — Winona Win- 
ters— Nat. It Wills— Lillian Kingsbury— Daffy ft 
Daisy. 

Blverside — "Bride Shop"— Sophie Tucker * go. 
—Three Bobs— Williams & Wolfus. 
BROOKLYN. 

Bushwi ok— Nellie Allen— Al. Herman— "Night 

Boat" — Wss. Zimmerman Sllber A North — Bert 

Uelroaa— Neahltt ft Clifford— Fire Kltamnraa. 

Orphans— MM Lada ft Lasslea— lai. J. Cor- 
bett— Begat * Bender— Bd. Morton — John B. Hy- 
mer as Ca. — Aaaeta — Violet Dale — Weber At Borne 
— Three Sallys — Oar* A Delanry. 
ATLAHYA, OA. 

Forayta— Clifford * Wllla— Bison City Pour— 
Dnrkln Oirle— Dooley A Bug*] — Beaumont A 
Arnold. 

•OSTON, MASS, 
Kalth'a — Kelly * Wilder— Boatoek'a Bldlnc 
School- Masle King A Co.— Kramer A Kemp- 
Kane A Hermta— Poor Amaranths — "Petticoats" 
— Adele Ritchie— Rooncy A Bent. 

BUFFALO, N. T. 
Shea's— Ben Welch— McKay A Ardlne — Jack La 
VIer— Lambert A Ball— Dooley A Nelson— Olsrk'a 
Bawallans. 

BALTIMORE. KB. 

Maryland— Three Alex — "Honor Thy Children" 
— Savoy A Brennan — Adele Rowland — Marck'a 

Lions. 

CINCINNATI, OHIO, 

Keith's — Mrs. dene Bngne* — Mane Stoddard — 
Oarelnettl ' Bros. — Gertrude Holmin — Clark A 
Verdi 

COLUMBUS. OHIO. 

Keith's — Nelson Waring — Annette Asorla Co. — 
Whipple Haston Co. — Watson Sisters — Sara Fad- 
den A Co. — Blllle Reeves A Co.— Kltner. Hawkley 
A McKay — Booth A Leander — DeForest A Kearna. 

DAYTON, OHIO. 
Koith'a — Cbss. B. Evans A Co. — Dong Pong One 
A Haw— Beatrice Morrel Sextette— Wlllsrd— Ray 
Samuels— Selhlnl, 

DETBOIT, MICH. 
Temple — Weston A Clnlre — Swor A Avery— Har- 
ry Vivian A Co.— Pllcer A Douglas— Joe Cook— 
Orvllle Hsrrold. 

ERIE, PA. 
Colonial — Moon A Morris — "Fashion Show" — 
Stone A Hsyes — Joe Browning — Mr. A Mrs. Mel 
burne— Nehcr A Cnappelle. 

OBAHD BAPID8, MICH. 




Empress — Brltt Wood— Cuerin & Newell — Will 
Ward A Olrls— Avellng A Lloyd— Bert Baker A 
Co. — Hal A Francis. 

HAMILTON, CAN. 

Temple— Brennan & Powell— Yalta*— Llda Mc- 
Millan A Co.— six Water Utiles. 

INDIANAI-OLIH, IND. 

Grand— S. Miller Kent— Francis A Boss— ConUn 
Parks Trio— Harry Qlrsrd A Co.— Rockwell A 
Wood. 

LOUISVILLE, KY. 
Kalth'a— "Foreat Fires"— Bennett A BJebsrds — 
Coco Lorraine— Stead mans— Larneds— Nip A Took 
— Chief Caupollcsn — Four Boysea. 

NASHVILLE, TENN. 
Prlnoosi (First Half)— "Girl With 1000 Byes." 
(Last HalO— Volunteera — Mr. A Mrs. Jlmmle 
Barry — "Olrl With 100O Eyes." 

PITTSBUHQH. PA. 
Davit — Florence Moore A Brother — Bfenmet Da 
Voy A Co.— I.lebtner A Alexander — Hooper A 
Marbury — Carper A Smith. 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 
Keith'a — Brlghtons — "Nnrseryland" — Tennessee, 
Ten — Una. Doree — Keene A Wblte — Cole. Bnsaell 
A Davla— Stan Stanley Trio— Florrle Mlllershlp. 
BOCHEBTER, N. T. 
Temple — Olffa MUbka — Mclntyre A Hcatb — Wm. 
Bbs — Four I.nkens — J. & B. Morgan — Cooper A 
Rlcnrdo— Valmont A Reynan— Merle's Cockatoos. 
TOLEDO. OHIO. 
Keith's — Walter Brower — Fern A Davis — Golet, 
Harrla A Morey — Wilfred Clark A Co.— "Robe- 
vllle" — Brongh'a Models,— Dslsy Leon — Clatrmont 
Bros. 

TORONTO, CAN. 
Shea's — Morton A Glass — Belle Baker — Ward A 
Van — Meenen'a Doge — Harris A Manlon — Beeman 
A Anderson. 

WASHINGTON, D. O. 
Keith's — Dainty Marie Meeker — Frank Crummlt 
— Sylvester A Vance — Imperial Chinese Duo— Car- 
llele A Bomer — Phyllis N. Terry — Selma Braara — 
Webb A Burns— Paul Dickey A Co. 
YOTJHGBTOWH, OHIO. 
Keith's— Lydcll A Hlgglns— Bena Parker— Mont- 
gomery A Perry — Emllle Slatera— Toota. Pake A 
Co.— Chas. Abearn A Co.— "Motor Boating." 

ORPHEUM CIRCUIT 

CHICAGO, nx. 

MaJestlo-Bmlly ABB Wellman A Oo.— Fsrber 
Girls— Win Oakland A Co.— Mania Lo— Herbert 
Clifton— Australian Crelgbtons — Walsh A Bentley. 



AT LIBERTY — FIRST TIME IN 10 YEAB9. 

James L. Dempsey 



(Low) 

Tenor Singer. 



COMEDIAN 



(Light) 



COLO. 
Orphanm — "The Cure"— Whiting A Bart— Clara 
Morton — Ethel Hopklna— Hallls-an A Sykes — Kul- 
lcrvo Bros.— Fannie A Al Aatalre. 
DE8 MOINES. IA. 
Orphanm — Dorothy Jardon — "Double Exposure" 
—Tower A Darren — Bmba A Alton — Corbett. 
Shepp A Dodo— Witt A Winter— Rita Mario Or- 
chestra. 

KANSAS CITY, MO. 

Orphenm— Mayhew A Taylor— Frances Nord- 
strom A Co.— Moore. Gardner A Rose — Estelle 
Wentworth— Caltes Bros.— Wheeler A Dolsn — 
Tempest A 8unsblne. 

LOS ANGELES. OAX. 
Omheem— French A Els — '« Or»r'«*o— Seven 
Honey Bova— Una Clayton A Co. — Alice Lyndoo, 
Doll A Co. — AVtl Merllnrree — Nnpette — The Can- 
slnos. 

LTNCOLK. WEB. 
Orphenm— Lew Dockstsder— Natalie Alt— I.vdla 
Barry — Brent Hayes — The Norveitea — Geo. Kelly 
A Co. — Newhoff A Phelps. 

MINNEAPOLIS. MINN, 
f n»he«m— Adele Blomt * C> — Hallen A Fnller — 
— Pat Barrett — Harry T- Mssnn— Meredith A 
Rnonxer— Hayca A V'"— "e*tcr tiroa. 
MILWAUKEE. WIS. 
Orphsum — Morgan Dancers — Avon Comedy Fonr 
— Poaslllo Sisters — Joe Towle — Kern A Berko— J. 
ft K. De Msco— Qsjlando. 

HEW ORLEANS. LA. 
Orphanm — Hyams A Melntvre — Wm. Gaxton A 
Co. — Jaa. C. Morton A Co. — Alexander. O'Nell A 
Sexton— Cole A Denehv — Hans Hanke — Martlnetrl 
A Sylveater. 

OMAHA. NEB. 
Orphenm — Claude Gllllnjrwster A Co. — Nellie 
Nichols— Misses Csmnbell— H. A A. Sevmonr — 
Tambert A Fredericks — Alaska Duo— Flanacsn A 
Bd wards. 

OAKLAND CAL. 

Orphenm — Cecil Cnnnlneham — Chung Hwn Four 
— Tne Herrena — Ashler A Allmsn — Ethel McDon- 
ougb — Togsn A Geneva. 

PORTLAND. ORE. 
Orphenm — Le Rov. Talma A Bnacn — Jane Conr- 
thorpe A Co. — Ben Deely A Co. — Aerial De Colts — 
Lonr A Ward — MHllcen'; Mower— G. Aldn Ran- 
degger. 

ST. LOOTS. MO. 

Orphanm — C. Edw. Bandbox Revne — Cresov A 
Dayne — Ryan A Lee— Lawward. Stafford A Co. — 
IJhonatl — Boothby A Everdeen— Blsck A White. 

BT. PATJL. »tTNN. 
Orphanm — Beatrice Herford — Too*. Swift A Co. 
— Bennv A Woods — rjemkn OnnV-l — Everest's Mon- 
keys—Three Jsnes — Rlggs A Wltchte. 

HAN FBAHOTSOO, OAL. 

Orphenm — Belle Story — Rossllnd Coxhlan A Co. 
— Barry Girls— Johnaton A Harty — Hermlne. 
Rhnnr A Co. — Bert Kenny — Gould A Lewis — Wright 
A Dietrich. 

SACRAMENTO. STOCKTON AND FRESNO. 

Orphaam -Edwin Ardee A Co. — "The Recital" — 
"Garden of Aloha" — Marmeln Sisters— "Tate'e 
Motoring"— McWattera A Tyson. 

SEATTLE, WASH. 
Orphanm — Ruth St. Denis — Marlon Harrla— King 
A King — Lewis A Norton — Helen Flngree A Co. — 
Btssett A Scott— Josle O'Meers. 

SALT LAKE CITY. UTAH. 

Orphoum — Countess Nsrdlnl — Cross A Josephine 
— Palfrey, Hall A Brown — Cbss. Orapewln A Co. 
— Hlrsebel Bendler — Medlln Watts A Townea — 
Billy Klnkald. 

VANCOUVER, OAK. 

Orphanm — Ray Cox — Boyle A Brown — Dorothy 
Shoemaker A Co.— De Leon A Davie* — Frank A 
Tonv— leach Allen Trio— Dorothy Brennrn. 

POU CIRCUIT 

BRIDGEPORT, CONN. 

Poll (First Half) — Archer A Belford— Thomaa P. 
Dunn— Phlna A Picks. (Last Half)— Dupree A 
Dupree — Herb Haywood — Storm A Msrsdoo — Plate] 
A Cashing. 

HABTFOBS. mm. 

Palaoe (First Half)— Arnold A Florens— Elsie 
White — Finders Keepers — Helder A Pecker — 
"Broadwsy Berne." (Last Half)— Sylvia Loyal- 
Archer A Belford — Mohr A Moffett— "Ruhevllle." 

Poll (First Half) — Herb Haywood — "Danny" — 
Welser A Reiser — Theo. A Her Dandles. (Laat 
Half) — Harry A Etta Conley — Four American Beau- 
ties — Five Versatile Glrla. 



. Just closed 0th season with Myrklo 
Harder Co. Address JAMES L. DEXPSEY, Elk*' 
Clob, Hew York City. 

SCOn WILLIAMS 

SCENIC ARTIST AND PARTS 
AT LIBERTY 

Addre** 

NEW MILLS HOTEL 

7th Ave, and 31th St. New York City 

MAX ROGERS AGENCY 

Now at 1562 Broadway 
WANTS NOVELTY ACTS FOR 
CABARET 

Telephone 5U4-58J5 Bryant 

FEDERAL BONDING COMPANY 

SO East 42d Stre-t, Naw York 
Suite 1702 

Corporation* Organised In New York. S3*. In- 
cluding Cesaptot* Outfit— Seed, Stock 
Certificate*. Etc. Accounts 
Solicit**! 

EXCELLENT FOOD GOOD SERVICE 

T*Urphooa Bryant «2*» 

Zbe St. Rtgta Restaurant 

AND BAKERY 
165 W. 47th Strawt 

Opposite Palace, 47th St. Side 

Bet. 6th Ave. A Broadway NEW YORK 

HERE'S WHERE HEADUNERS MEET 



Telephone 1631 Mclro«c. 

H. P. Knight Scenic Studios 

140th St. and Walton Ave., Now York 

Three blocks south of Mott Avenue Subway 

Station. 

SCENERY OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 

Always on Hand. 

Scenery Rented for Try Out Acts. 



Central Fibre Wardrobe 

$35.00 




[qui to the 

ivense $60.00 

wartime iftv! 

6UJUUNT!fO 

CENTRALTRUNK 
FACTORY 

SIMONS A CO. 

IN Arch St. 

Phils. 



\V ANTED 

By L. B. "Weiselmann stock Co.. good General 
Business People, with specialties; Young Character 
Woman. State all In first letter, address L. B. 
-WESBELafAlTH. Btockham, Beb. 



WANTED 

Musica. Comedy People lines 

Permanent stock, Denver, Col., one a week. 
Also 16 chorus girls. 6 boys, male quartette, 
sister team. State lowest salary first letter. 
Rehearsals May 16th, Chicago; open June let. 
Fares paid both waya from Chicago. Address 
WALTER D. ORR. Union HotsL Chicago. 111. 






HEAD LINE 

the bill. You can be a headliner if 
you get jour Comedy Material from 

THE NEW No. 3 

McN ALLY'S BULLETIN 

Everything; Naw, Bright and Original 
PRICE Sl.OO 

y.vilTV'a BTTLLETIN So. 9 contain* 
IT BCRT-AMNO MONOLOQtTEB. for He 
brew. Irish, Blsck and White Pace, Dutch 
Tramp, Wop. Pemale and Stump Speech. 

10 OBEAT ACTS FOR TWO MALES. Bach 
act an applause winner. 

t BOABXHO ACTS FOB MALE ABB FE- 
MALE. They'll make good on any bill. 

ta BTTstB-FTBE PARODIES. On all of 
Broadway's latest Song Hits. 

A COMEDO SKETCH. Entitled "ANXIOUS 
TO OET BICH." If* th* PTJNNIEST 
SKETCH In VsodevlUe. 

H.VAH. va MERBY MTJISTREXB. Con. 
alitlnir of six corking PIBST FARTS, end- 
lng with a screaming Finale. "NOT 
GUILTY." 

A TABLOID COMEDY AMD BTrBXESQTJZ, 
entitled "IT'S YOUR WIFE": also bun- 
deeds of Croas-Flre Oaga and Jokes and 
additional Comedy Surprise*. Be member 
the price of KcNALLT'8 BTTIXBTIN No. 
2 is only OBZ POT.T.aB per copy, wits 
mooey-baek guarantee. 
WM. MrJUUT, *1 E. 12S*4 H. Hew TarV 




Miss TOMMY ALLEN 

Tomboy Comedienne 

Fourth S— son Featured with Boarding 

School Girls 

DIRECTION IRVING COOPER 
Wanted Quick For 

Franklin Stock Company 

General business woman with specialties; other 
useful people write. Salary absolutely sure. 
Managers in Georgia. Alabama. Mississippi 
send open time. Air Domes. Address EVANS 
A FOSTER. WUllaton, Florida. 



DOLLY CONNOLLY 



PHILADELPHIA 

via New Jersey Central 

EVERY HOUR ON THE HOUR 

From Llbarty St.. 7 A. M. to IS P. M. 

and at Midnight with Sleepers 

It MINUTES OF THE HOUR 

From W. 2M St. 

YOUR WATCH IS YOUR TIME TABLE 

Consult P. W. HEROY, E. P., Agent 

!♦*» BROADWAY, NEW YORK 

Bal's Dreadnaught 




AT SUBMARINE PRICKS 
VIM I H rack 






»M*a 

Baaca 

M aaea 1 

<J inch. 

WILLIAM BAL COMPANY 

1*15 W. 48th St, N. Y. 4 W. 22dSr_ H T. 
NEW ORCULAR NOW READY 

Dap Msrafrssl 






30 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



May 2, 1917 



JIMMIE DOLLY 

SHEA, and McCUE 

Exclusive Material 



HERBERT 



LEW 



PIANO AND SONG COMEDY 

BOOKED SOLID 



THE THREE ROZELLAS 

A Classy Musical Oddity 

IM VAUDEVILLE Diractioa ARTHUR H OR WTTZ 



A BREEZE FROM THE PLAINS 

NEBRASKA BILL & CO. 



WESTERN NOVELTY ACT 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



JOHN 



JOHNNY 



MARTIN and ELLIOTT 

"THOSE FASHION PLATE DANCING BOYS" 

Direction MARK LEVY 



DAINTY QUEEN OF SENSATIONAL RHYTHMIC GRACE 

LA PETITE MERCEDES 

A GORGEOUS DISPLAY OF NOVEL RICHNESS 

Direction ARTHUR J. HORWITZ 



Thomas & Henderson 

The Black Steppers 

WATCH THEM IN VAUDEVILLE 



The Boy Who Came Back 

In a New Act by ADaa Spancar Tannay 
ASK MY AGENT 



FANNIE 

KEELER 

"TAKING CHANCES." 



BUXIE 

IVI< 

Direction MARK LEVY 



THREE SYNCOPATORS 



LANG 

Direction GLADYS BROWN 



noHou 



FREDERICK H. SPEARE AND CO. 

Ott«r tBaft No vm C-o sBatairv Skfltea Hit. 



NOW HEADUNINO LOEW CIRCUIT 



REPRESENTATIVE LOUIS WBUT 



BENTELL BROS. 



Acrobatic Dancers 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



Direction MARK MONROE 



JAS. E. 



ED. F. 



WORLD & PEAT 

SINGING, DANCING AND COMEDY IN VAUDEVILLE 



SKATING VENUSES 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



Direction HARRY WEBER 



IL_ 

Upside Down Comedians 



DIRECTION WENONAH M. TENNEY 



FRANKIE FAY 



D< VAUDEVILLE 



O'BRIEN & KING 

In THeHnSw^pTaNO^PLa' YER 



HENRY LOWY & LACEY LISTERS 



ECCENTRICITIES IN SONCS AND DANCES 



aJIM C. 

COVENEY & W00DR0W 



The Precedents of Vaudeville 



PHYLLIS 



EUGENE 



CURWOOD and GORMAN 

Before the Honeymoon and After 

By HERMAN KAHN 
Copyrighted 



KATHRYN MILEY 

"Nature's Own Comedienne" 

In Vaudeville 



Three lNIorrie Sisters 

Singing, Dancing, Novelty 

New Act In V»udavilla 



AND 

IN "A VAUDEVILLE SURPRISE" 

BO OKED SOLID U. B. O. DIRECTION JACK MAGANN 

Dan Dix & Virgil 

WITH STAMPEDE RIDERS 



RUTH 

u 

tS VAUDEVILLE 



JOE 



AND 



HARRY PINCUS 



BILLY GLASON 



Norelty -JUST SONCS" Chirxfr 



N. V. A. 



DIRECTION A. J. HORWITZ 



MI-KELLEY& CATLIN-«t 

THOSE NATURAL COMEDIANS 

tbtmmmmmt»tittmMimt(^mtbrMiieminUat^mM^CMrTj^a^tmf^mtmmmfm^mtfmmWatm- 



Stetson&Huber Cooney Sisters 



May 2, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



31 



ROUTE UST 



■UKLESQUE 

Colombia Circuit 

Bowery Bnrlesquers — Gaiety, Buffalo, 30- 
M»y S; Rochester, 7-12. 

Bostonlans — Gaiety, Washington, 30-May B ; 
Gaiety, Pittsburgh, 7-12. 

Bellman Show— Casino, Brooklyn, 30-M»y 5; 
Empire, Newark, 7-12. 

Follies of the Day — Miner's, Bronx, Mew 
York, 80-May S. 

Golden Crooka— -Empire, Hoboken, 30-May 
S ; Philadelphia. 7-12. 

Olobe Trotters — Empire, Newark, N. J., 30- 
May B; close. 

Hastings' Bis Show — Gaiety, Kansas City. 
30-May S. 

Howe's, 8am, Kissing Glrla — Chicago, 30- 
May B ; close. 

Hip, Hip, Hooray Girls — Gaiety. Pittsburgh, 
30-May 5: Star, Cleveland, 7-12. 

Hello, New York — Empire, Brooklyn, 30- 
May 5; Park. Bridgeport, 10-12. 

Inrta T » Big Show — Gaiety, Detroit, 30-May 
B; Gaiety, Toronto, 7-12. 

Irwin's Majesties — Chicago. 30-May 5; 

Gaiety, Detroit, 7-12. 

Liberty Girls — People's, Philadelphia, 30- 
May 5; Palace, Baltimore, 7-12. 

Maids of America — Empire, Albany, N. Y.. 
80-May 5; Boston, 7-12. 

Marion's, Dare. Show — Lyric, Dayton, O., 
80-May 3: Olympic, Cincinnati. 7-12. 

Midnight Maidens— Boston, 80-May S; 
Grand, Hartford, 7-12. 

Million Dollar Dolls— Casino, Philadelphia, 
30-May 6; close. 

Merry Bounders — Colombia, New York, 30- 
May 5: Casino, Brooklyn, 7-12. 

New York Girls— Star, Cleveland, O., 30- 
May 6: Empire, Toledo, O., 7-12. 

Puns Puss — Jacques. Waterbury. Ct., 80- 
May 6; Newbnrg 4 Poughkeepsle. 7-12. 

Rag Doll In Bagland — Empire, Albany, N. 
£.. 28-28: Boston, 30-May 6; Columbia, 
New York, 7-12. 

ioseland Girls— Open, 30-May S; Gaiety, 
Kansas City, 7-12. 

Beeves', Al, Show — Colonial, Providence, 80- 
May 5; Boston. 7-12. 

Splgel's Revue — Gaiety, Montreal, Canada, 
30-May 6; Empire, Albany, 7-12. 

Sporting Widows — Gaiety. Toronto, Ont, 30-- 
May 5: Gaiety, Buffalo, 7-12. 

Some Show — Olympic. Cincinnati, 30-May 5; 
Chicago, 7-12. 

Step Lively Glrhi — Empire, Toledo, O., 30- 
May 5; Lyric, Dayton, 7-12. 

Sightseers — Grand, Hartford, Ct, 30-May 5;. 
Waterbury, 7-12. 

Sldman, Sam, Show — Park, Bridgeport, Ct.. 
May 3-5; Providence, 7-12. 

Twentieth Century Malda — Hurtlg A Sem- 
on's, New York, 30-May 5; Brooklyn, 7- 
12. 

Watson & Wrotbe Show— Bastable, Syracuse, 
N. Y., 30-May 2 ; Lumberg, Utlca, 3-5 : 
Montreal, 7-12. ■ _ „ 

Watson's, Billy, Show — Palace, Baltimore, 
30-May 5; Gaiety, Washington, 7-12. 

Welch, Ben, Bhow — Newburg, N. Y., 30-May 
2 ; Poughkeepsle, 3-5 ; close. 

Williams, Mollle— Gaiety, St. Louis, 30> 
May S; Chicago, 7-12. 

American Circuit 

Americans — Gaiety, Baltimore. 30-May B; 

Olvmpic, New York, 7-12. 
Auto Girls — Englewood, Chicago, 30-May 5; 

close. 

Cabaret Girls— Standard, St LouIb, 30-May 
B : Gaiety. Chicago. 7-12. 

Charming Widows — Gaiety, Minneapolis, 30- 
May 5 : close. 

French Frolics— Gaiety, Chicago, 30-May 5 : 
Indianapolis, 7-12. ^ 

Follies of Pleasure — Century, Kansas City, 
Mo., 30-May 6; dose. 

Girls from the Follies — Olympic, New York, 
30-May 6; Gaiety, Brooklyn, 7-12. 

Girls from Joylsnd — Penn Circuit 30-May 
B; Gaiety, Baltimore, 7-12. 

Monte Carlo Girls — Indianapolis, Ind., 30- 
May 6. 

Military Maids — Holyoke, Mass.. 30-May 2 ; 
Springfield, 3-5 ; New Bedford, 7-0 ; Wor- 
cester, 10-12. „„ 

Pacemakers — Gaiety, Milwaukee, 30-May 3: 
dose. 

Record Breakers — Empire. Cleveland, 30- 
May 5; Penn Circuit, 7-12. 

Social Follies — Akron, 0„ May 3-5: close. 

Tempters — Gaiety, Brooklyn, 30-May 5; 
Star, Brooklyn, 7-12. 

U. S. Beauties— Orpheum, Paterson, N. J., 
30-May 6; dose. 

International Circuit 

"Her Unborn Child," Co. B — National. Chi- 
cago, 30-May 5. 

•'Her Unborn Child." Co. C— Walnut Phila- 
delphia, 30-May 3. 

"Katsenjammer Kids" — Detroit, 30-May 5. 

"Pretty Baby" — St Louis, 30-May 5. 

"8mart Set" — Cleveland, O., 30-May 5. 

Thurston — Erie, Pa., 80-May 2 ; Canton, 8-6 ; 
Akron. 7-12. 

"Uncle Tom's Cabin" — Pittsburgh, 30-May 
5; Cleveland, O., 6-12. 

STOCK 

Academy Players — Haverhill, Mass., Indef. 
American Players — Spokane, Wash., lndef. 
Auditorium Players — Maiden, Mass., lndef. 
Angell Stock (Joe Angell, mgr.) — Park, 

Pittsburgh, Lndef. 
Baker Stock — Portland, Ore., lndef. 
Bryant, Marguerite. Players — Youngstown, 

until June 2. 



Bleeker Players — Albany, N. Y., lndef. 
Bishop Players — Oakland, Cal.. lndef. 
Banting, Emma, Stock — San Antonio, Tex., 

indef. 
Columbia Musical Stock— Oakland, Cal., ln- 
def. 
Cornell-Price Players — Wauseon, O., lndef. 
Columbia Stock — Laurel, DeL, 30-May 4. 
Cunningham. Billy, Stock — Prostburg, Md., 

Elk Garden, W. Va, 30-May 5. 
Dale, Kathryn, Stock—Omaha, Neb., lndef. 
Desmond, Mae, Co. (Ed. Cuddy, mgr.) — 

Schenectady, N. Y., lndef. 
Denham Stock — Denver, lndef. 
Duhlnsky Stock (Ed. Dublnsky, mgr.) — St. 

Joseph. Mo., lndef. 
Earl Stock (Larry Powers, mgr.)— Sharps- 

burg, Pa., lndef. 
ESckhardt, Oliver, Players — Begins, Saak., 

Can., lndef. 
Emerson Players — Lowell. Masa. indef. 
Empire Players— Salem, Mass., indef. 
Fifth Ave. Stock (Jacques H. Horn, mgr.) — - 

Fifth Ave., Brooklyn, lndef. 
Fields, Marguerite, Flayers — White Plains, 

N. Y„ indef. 
Gordlnler Bros., Stock— Ft Dodge, la., lndef. 

Hyperion Musical Players — New Haven. 

Conn., indef. 

Home, Cot F. P., Stock — Akron, O., indef. 

Jewett, Henry, Players — Copley. Boston, ln- 
det 

Keith's Hudson Theatre, Stock— Union Hill, 
N. J., lndef. 

Keith Stock — Portland, Me., lndef. 

Knickerbocker Stock (Carl Miller, mgr.) — 
Philadelphia, lndef. 

Knickerbocker Players — Syracuse, N. Y., 28, 
lndef. 

Lawrence, Del, Stock— San Francisco, lndef. 

Lyric Theatre Stock — Bridgeport Conn., ln- 
def. 

Lonergan Players (E. V. Phelan, mgr.) — 
Lynn. Mass., lndef. 

Lewln, Florence, Flayers (Hawkins & Kibbee, 
mgrs.) — Wichita, Kan., indef. 

Morosco Stock — Los Angeles, lndef. 

McKlnley. Pattl. Players— Zanesville, O., ln- 
def. 

Moiart Players — EMmlra, N. Y., Indef. 

Manhattan Players — Rochester, N. Y., lndef. 

Naylor, Walter, Players — New Britain, Conn., 
indef. 

New Strand Stock — Mobile, Ala., lndef. 

Norwood, Maude, Stock (Wm. J. Nelson, 
mgr.)— Oil City, Pa., Indef. 

Nesbitt Players — Wllkes-Barre. Pa., indef. 

Orpheum Players — Reading, Pa., lndef. 

Overholser Stock — Oklahoma City, Okia., ln- 
def. 

Oliver, Otis, Players (Harry J. Wallace, 
mgr.) — La Fayette, Ind., indef. 

Opera Players — Kansas City, Mo., lndef. 

Payton, Corse, Stock — Lexington, New York, 

Poll Stock — Scranton, Pa., lndef. 
Poll Players — Poll's Washington, lndef. 
Poll Players — Worcester, Mass.. indef. 
Packard, Jay, Stock — Newark, N. J., lndef. 
Price, Stanley, Players — Grand Rapids, Mich., 

lndef. 
Shubert Stock — Milwaukee, lndef. 

Shubert Stock— St. Paul, indef. 

SomervUle Theatre Players — Somervllle, 
Mass., lndef. 

St Clair, Winifred, Stock (Earl Slpe, mgr.) 
— Trenton. N. J., indef. 

St Claire, Winifred. 8tock— Paterson. N. J.. 
lndef. 

Temple Stock — Ft Wayne, Ind., lndef. 

Toler, Sydney, Stock — Portland, Me., lndef. 

Travers-Douglas Stock — Grand 0. H., Brook- 
lyn, 30, lndef. 

Van Dyke & Eaton Stock (F. Mack, mgr.) — 
Tulsa, Okla., indef. 

Wilkes Players — Salt Lake City, indef. 

Wilkes Musical Stock — Vancouver, Can., ln- 
def. 

Wadsworth Dram. Stock (Edward Ornsteln, 
mgr.) — Toledo, O., lndef. 

Wallace, Chester, Players — Butler, Pa., lndef. 

Williams, Ed., Stock — Elkhart, Ind., lndef. 

Williams, Ed„ Stock — Qulncy, 111., lndef. 

Woods, Lew, Stock — Syracuse, N. Y.. lndef. 

Walker, Stuart, Players — Indianapolis, May 
14, indef. 

COMPANIES IN TABLOID PLAYS 

Permanent and Traveling 

Barker, Betty, Musical Revue — Bartlesvllle, 

Okla., 30-May 0; Enid, 7-12. 
Clark. Billy, Comic Opera Co. — Pasadena, 

Cat, May 2-5; Tart, 6-8; Vlsalia, 0-11. 
Enterprise Stock (Norman Hilvard, mgr.) — 

Chicago, lndef. 
Enterprise Stock No. 2 Co. (Norman Hilvard, 

mgr.) — Chicago, lndef. 
Gramllck's, Cbaa, Follies of the Day — Moose 

Jaw. Can., lndef. 
Hello Southland Revue (Gardner & Lawson, 

mgrs.) — Ardmore, Okla., 30-May 5. 
Lord & Vernon M. C. Co. — Greenville, Tex., 

80-May 6. 
Reidway & Burton M. C. Co. — Mlnot, N. D., 

Indef. 
Shaffer's, AL, Boys & Girls — Shawnee. Okla.. 

29-May 6. 
Soladar, Cbaa,, * Brinkley Girls — Meadvllle, 

Pa., 80-May 5; Braddock, 7-12. 
Tabarin Girls — Portsmouth, O.. 30-May 5. 
Walker's Musical and Lady Minstrels — Iron- 
ton, O., 30-May 6 ; Cnillfcotne, 7-12. 
Zarrow's American Girl Co. — Fairmont, W. 

Va., 30-May 3. 
Zarrow's Little Bluebird Co. (Jack Fnquay, 

mgr.) — Washington, Pa., 30-May 5. 
Zarrow's Variety Review (D. J. Lynch, mgr.) 

— Grafton. -W. Va., 80-May 5. 

(Continued on page 38.) 



BILL JEROME 

SAYS 

DON'T MISS M-I-S-S-I-S-S-l-P-P-I 

The Greatest Kid Song the World has ever known. As 
FRANCES WHITE of ROCK & WHITE will not leave New 
York this or next season, she has kindly released the sing- 
ing rights of this greatest of all New York sensations. No 
child artiste can fail with M-I-S-S-I-S-S-I-P-P-I. It can also 
be used by GROWN UPS. M-I-S-S-I-S-S-I-P-P-I is the Big 
Comedy Song of the year. This wonderful HARRY TIER- 
NEY Melody -will sweep all America. 



In Chicago we have another Sensation of the Harry Tierney 

make — SOMETIME. RAYMOND HITCHCOCK in 

BETTY has all Chicago humming it. HITCHY and 
SOMETIME are The Talk of the Windy City. We have a 
great double version of this great song. The Big Stars are 
all putting on SOMETIME. 



If you want a Timely Comedy Number don't overlook 

"IF I CATCH THE GUY WHO 
WROTE POOR BUTTERFLY" 

A worthy companion to our Celebrated "COME OVER, 
COME OVER, COME ON OVER HERE, ITS A WON- 
DERFUL PLACE." 



That fast song that you have been looking for all season is 
now ready in all keys, the title is 

"COTTON PICKIN' TIME 
IN ALABAM" 

Daly & Cool, who wrote it, have turned out a "worthy suc- 
cessor to the famous Robert E. Lee. 



When you want Regular Songs form our acquaintance. 



WM. JEROME PUBLISHING CORP. 

STRAND THEATRE BLDG. 

B'WAY AND 47th ST., NEW YORK 

SUITE 310 



32 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



May 2, 1917 



SMIMBHimilHIIIIG'll 



niOUllliillUB 



iniiiiraiifliimiiHiiiirjiHiiiiitrj'JiiJjiiiiii:! tiiiiiffliiiimffliEiami 




II 



Return Next Season to Vaudeville 
in a New One Act Musical Sketch 

Entitled 

THE LOBBY-GOBB 



1 



19 



By Frank Orth 



fcimuminratifliiiiMimuM 



Direction Max Hart 



ni3li;illllil|[l]illl:|]lill]||llilllll]|il;[]lllllilll!!l!l1111l!lllllllllffl 




IVI 



Ml 



Added another great success last week to its long chain of Emerald Gems, when the charming prima donna. 



MAUDE l-A IN/IB EI t=?-T 

(of Lambert & Ball) introduced for the first time at Keith's Alhambra Theatre, New York, ERNEST R. BALL'S and 

J. KEIRN BRENNAN'S novelty number 




L 



1 



I 



their very latest contribution to the song loving public. It is not a ballad, but a rollicking 2/4 Irish lilt, that smacks of the 

old sod," Miss Lambert said: "I have never in my singing career had a song that I liked, could sing, or went any better 

than this did for me." PROFESSIONAL COPIES AND ORCHESTRATIONS IN ALL KEYS NOW READY 



M. Witmark & Sons 



PHILADELPHIA 



BOSTON 



san Francisco - Chicago m, Witmark & Sons Philadelphia boston 

JT D 7JLi idi Z ' Sch1 "" Buildin * : Uptown Prof. Rooms. AL. COOK. Mgr. 1021 Ch « tnut St - 2I8 jSjjg s ^ 

AL BROWNE. Mgr. TOM QUIGLEY, Mgr. 1562 broadway, next to palace theatre ED. EDWARDS. Mgr. JACK LAHEY, Mgr. 



1021 Chestnut St. 



218 Tremont St. 



-^SBEDDIE . MARGIE BILLY 

DeLi.e?Stewarf, Hardy 



20th Century Trio in Song, Danes and Patter 



Rep. Tom Jones 



MAX HART ^PRESENTS 
THE 



VAL THE ERNIE 

STANTONS 



In "OH, BRAZIL" 



M»y 7, COLONIAL 



Five Borsinis 

Novel Comedy Revolving Globe Spectacle 

BIG TIME ACT IN VAUDEVILLE 



Ray Lynch 



A BIG SURPRISE 



Arthur Clay 



FOUR AMERICAN BEAUTIES 

Fred Slater «*■*!« of wenonah m. tenney Lew p^ 



May 2, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



33 



COAST TOUR FOR CORT SHOWS 

John Cort'a two musical productions, 
"Flora Bella" and "The Masked Model," 
began this week separate tours, to the 
Pacific Coast, which will extend through- 
out the Summer. The first named con- 
cluded its Eastern engagement last Sat- 
urday night at the Alvin, Pittsburgh, Pa., 
and will play its way west over the 
Northern route. "The Masked Model," 
on the same night, at the Duqueane The- 
atre, in the same city, finished a three 
weeks' engagement, and will go to the 
Coast by way of Iowa City, Omaha, Lin- 
coln, Denver, etc., going to San Fran- 
cisco. 



LAMBS WILL GIVE AMBULANCE 

The Lambs are to donate an ambulance 
outfit to the American Red Cross out of 
the profits of the Lambs' Gambol, which 
is to begin Ssnday night, May 27, in- 
stead of the following Monday at the New 
Amsterdam Theatre. 



LAMMERS WITH "MOVIE CIRL" 

Davenport, la., April 28. — Charles J. 
Lammers is managing Rowland & How- 
ard's new act "The Movie Girl," in which 
he is also playing the leading comedy role. 
The act puts in the Summer on the Pan- 
tages time. 



AGENTS GET HEP 

COIN BIG MONEY QUICK 

Sell the most complete line of 

Photo-Handled Knives for Sales Boards 

Knives are all made of best steel. Handles with the latest REAL ART, SEPTEMBER 
MORN, JESS WILLARD and other ATTRACTIVE DESIGNS. We want Agents in 
every city and town. We manufacture our own Knives, and, therefore, we are not de- 
pendent on foreign supplies. We ship promptly. We are the largest Manufacturers 
and Distributors of Photo-Handled Knives for Sales and Raffle Cards in tine United 
States. Write us and we will see that you are promptly supplied. Ask for catalog and 
terms today. Do not delay. 

WE ASSIGN YOU TERRITORY AND PROTECT YOU IN IT 

GOLDEN RULE CUTLERY CO. 

212 No. Sheldon Street Dept 57 Chicago, 01. 






MAGIC! 



BRET HARTE'S SON DEAD 

SAN FRANCISCO, April 28.— Word 
has been received here of the death of 
Francis K. Bret Harte, last surviving 
•on of Bret Harte, author and poet, which 
occurred recently at Monte Carlo. 



I ACTS FOS SATE CHEAP. We 
Buy, Sell or Exchange need 

'Apparatus. Proft-ealonal Cats., 
log 10c. Pocket Trick Included KItF.K. Wilts or 
Call. Hornman Matin Co.. Sta. 1. 470 8th Av..N. Y. 




WSKlRJffl 



let os phot* 

Sand lOo. for .ample*. 



IT IS BE8T 
lit W. 41th St. 



■ - T 



JOHN 



LILLIAN 



ORREMDREW 



IN A 



"BARNYARD EPISODE" 

ABSOLUTELY ORIGINAL 



r. and IVIfaS. 

Orrin Markhus 

Premier lea Skater* College laa, Chicago Season MM and M17 

WANTED QUICK FOR MUSICAL COMEDY 

Singing and Dancing; Comedian. Straight Man with good voice (tenor or baritone) . Han (or 
.mail parta (tenor or baritone). All for quartet work. Lead numbers. Must have first-class 
wardrobe. Also musical director (A. F. M.), good chorus girls, other good people. State (uii 
particulars first letter or wire. Long summer and regular season. Mention lowest salary. 

GRACEY-CHRISTIE MUSICAL COMEDY CO. 

Week Apr. 38— Grand Theatre, Rutland, Vt. Mar 7-s-t— Ciena Fall., N. Y. 

Mar is- li-iz— Saratoga Springs, N. Y. 

— MORIARITY SISTERS 

DRESDEN DOLLS OF VAUDEVILLE 



MOLLY 
Direction IRVING SHANNON 



ALLIANCE HOTEL 

258 Wert 44th Street, Now York City 
AMERICAN AND EUROPEAN PLAN. 4* SacceuU from Broad-ay. 
ana here high-class accommodations and service at reasonable prices. 



Professional people win 
Tel. Bryant 60GB. 



SONG WRITERS ^Mgff^M 

PERFORMER SrOBT. H. BRENNEN. 1433 Broadway.N. Y. 



SONGWRITERS 



STUDIOS.127 Gaiety Theatre BruldiSs, R. Y. Gty 



^/W/W/WW/W^^^^ 




FOR ~~™~ , 

New Theatre, Modern, Fireproof 

In a middle west city of 45,000 people. This is a strictly modern up-to-date 
theatre in every respect. Complete in every detail, 1,400 seats, equipped 
with washed air, cooling: and ventilating system. The only first-class 
theatre in the city. Will lease to responsible parties only. Write or wire 
"A & F," care of The New York Clipper. 



r//s/w/ss//sssAr/v/ssss/sss/r/yrssssssswssss^^ 



VMWWMWW/WVMWfii 



DAGHISTAN'S 

FAMOUS NOVELTY ORCHESTRA 

AT LIBERTY— DISAPPOINTMENT 

Banjos, saxophones, concert marimba drums and piano. Double on ukeleles 
and guitars. R. H. DAGHISTAN, Manager, 804 W. First St, Elmira, N. Y. 



AT LIBERTY 



0. L PRATHER LILLIAN PRATHER 



Leads— Characters 
If alght f It., Waight ISS, Aga 21 



All requirements. 



Hsdght f ft. I in., Waight Ut, Aga 14 
Join on wire. O. L_ PRATHER. Madison, Nebraska. 



THE GIRL, 1KOM 
BRIGHTON 

ENCHANTRESS OF RAGTIME ALLEY. 



KITTY FLYNN 



■ BOOKED SOLID 



Wanted for the Lanshaw Players 

Under canvas. Leading Han to direct, S. & D. Comedian, Gen. Bus. Man and Woman with 
specialties. Piano Player (lady), one who can play parts. Boss Canvas Man. Wardrobe, Ability 
and Sobriety absolutely essential. State all, very lowest salary, etc., and enclose photos and 
program. Rahaaraala Mar 7. Open tha 14th. G. J. LANSHAW, Lakeview, Mich. 



THE PARFAIT BLUES 

A Dollar" a a Dollar, a Dima'a a Dim*, this ona'e tha place, you'll save It all tha time 

PARFAIT MODE SHOP 



A Trial Will Convince YOU 
J. FEIGENBAUM A FELIX YOUNG, Mgn. 
its W. 45th St, Salt* 7B. New York 



Pbews XMt Bryant 



RUTH ROBINSON 

Lawawawl Woman 

MOROSCO THEATRE, LOS ANGELES 

America's Foremost Productions 




THE A D E L A I D E 



754-756 EICHTH AVENUE. B*t.. 4tjth 

»-•.. Ceteris*!] uxi!v I© r*-«'L<i»la-»-<l tin ihii.tl :»rt. 



,d 47lh STREETS 

MRS GEORGE inter.!.. Mi 



. 



34 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



May 2, 1917 



THE 

BIG HURRAH 

NUMBER 



GEORGE M. COHAN'S FAVORITE 



YOU'RE 



START 

'EM WITH A 

BANG! 



A GRAND OLD FLAG 

Vaudeville artists, cabaret singers, artists of all kinds: — -The public demands patriotic songs. This great flag 

song is a sure-fire knock-out for any act. Geo.; M. Cohan wrote it and endorses it. 

Write for professional copy and "orchestration 

MAURICE RICHMOND MUSIC CO., Inc., 145 West 45th St., New York 



ARTHUR KLEIIV PRESENTS 



JOSEPH EL 



ETHLYN 



HOWARD and CLARK 



IN 



"A MUSICAL WORLD REVUE" 

IN FOUR SCENES 
Produced, Presented and Devised by JOSEPH E. HOWARD 

AT B. F. KEITH'S PALACE THEATRE INDEFINITELY 



REMOVAL NOTICE! 

SANGER & JORDAN 

(INCORPORATED) 

WALTER C. JORDAN, President 

INTERNATIONAL 
PLAY BROKERS 

AND 

AUTHORS' AGENTS 

GERALD F. BACON, General Manager 

Have removed their offices to the 

TIMES BUILDING 

Times Square, NEW YORK 

Seme Tfcone Nnmber*— 600-601 Bryant 



LEW SHARP 



RUBE GOLDIE 



5 MERRY YOUNGSTERS 

Fun — Fast and Furious 

HARRY GOODMAN ' JOHN GREEN MACK COLEMAN 

DIRECTION LEE MUCKENFUSS WATCH THIS SPACE 



V •■■v.-*.^. -v-v •«.■».■».-«..«..* -v ■>. -«.-v-w». •».■». -v». -w-v-v-v •>.-«.•«. -v ->.•«. -v-v -V •». -v-v -v -w -v 



----^-*-»-»-1'-»it.' 



ss 



CHICAGO CABARET STARS 



•.•.-.-.-.'.-.•.•.•.•.•.-. 



^■^^■^^. . . . ^^^.^^n.^.^.^.^^^^^^.^.^.^ 



•.-.-.-. n 



BENNY 



JACK 



BENNY 



FIELDS, SALISBURY & DAVIS 

A Sensation at Majestic Theatre, Chicago, Week of April 9th 

At die Wyndiff Inn Indefinitely 

CHARLIE THORPE AT THE PIANO RAY HERNANDEZ DIRECTOR 

LOOK FOR THE OPENING OF 

DAN BLANCO 

THE GRAND CAFE 

At Southeast Cor. Grand Ave. and North Clark Street, Chicago 

MLLE. MARION and MARTINES RANDALL 

IN DANCES 

AT GREEN HILL GARDENS-SEVENTH SUCCESSFUL WEEK 



THE WORLD WONDER DANCERS 

Diiplifsttng Their Chicago Success in Detroit 



Lillian Bernard 

KANSAS CITY FAVORITE 

Congress Cats, Chicago, TaJ s f . 



GEORGETTE 

DRESDEN DOLL OF THE CABARETS 

New, 



May 2, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



35 



>N PICTURES 




BRADYGRAPPLES 

WITH KING OF 

PHIIAFILMS 

CUTS MASTBAUM*S POWER 



GOLDWYN TO AID EXHIBITORS 

The Goldwyn Company, it is reported, 
will incorporate in their exhibitor contracts 
a clause calling for an expenditure on the 
part of the company, of a part of the ren- 
tal charge in local newspaper advertising. 
This system of co-operating with the ex- 
hibitor was originated by the K-E-S-E -in 
connection with the booking of the Max 
Linder comedies, and at the time of its 
announcement aroused considerable com- 
ment. 



Philadelphia is witnessing a titanic 
struggle between World Films and Stanley 
Mastbaum, and latest reports are that 
World Films are cutting a deep wedge in 
Mastbaum's trench works. 

The World, under startling orders from 
William A. Brady three weeks ago, broke 
with Mastbaum when the former stated 
he couldn't see why Mastbaum should 
control the entire film business of the 
City of Brotherly Love without owning 
the theatres. It was reported that Mast- 
baum's exchange had been charging ex- 
hibitors 20 per cent, above the price pro- 
ducers placed on pictures. 

When Brady pulled World films out of 
Mastbaum's offices, there were only four 
theatres in the entire Quaker City game 
enough to quit Mastbaum also and go 
along with him on a direct trade for 
World pictures. 

Since that time, three weeks ago, how- 
ever, about fifteen more theatres have cut 
loose from Mastbaum in favor of the 
Brady crusade. 

The importance of this battle cannot be 
exaggerated. If Brady wins, it will mean 
that Mastbaum's grip is broken. The erst- 
while king of Philadelphia movies will be 
through so far as his film following on the 
Delaware is concerned. 

But if Mastbaum wins, it will mean 
that World films are through in the cradle 
of American liberty. 

Mastbaum's hold on the film game in 
Philadelphia has long been the riddle of 
the industry. For the past few years he 
has dictated with supreme power the man- 
ner of films, the manner of getting them 
and the price to be paid for them, to all 
exhibitors in the city. He has done this 
without owning a nickel's worth of stock 
in the 200 or more theatres not directly 
incorporated under his name, so far as ia 
generally known. All have been compelled 
to get their films from the Mastbaum ex- 
change and pay the toll. 

To producers in New York it wasn't 
clear why Philadelphia exhibitors should 
stand for this. The latter could have 
banded together and started competitive 
exchanges; new independent capital could 
have bucked Mastbaum, or the exhibitors 
could have rigged up some way to deal 
with New York producers direct. 

That's the way Brady figured, anyhow, 
and he thought he'd wake the town up. 
There was no economic reason he could 
find for Mastbaum's existence, and he 
didn't believe in hypnotism. 

Every new theatre that quits Mast- 
baum and swings to Brady, and likewise 
every theatre that loses its nerve and 
swings back from Brady to Mastbaum 
marks a step in the battle. 

NEW MERGER RUMORED 

According to reports from a most au- 
thentic source, a new merger of several of 
the independent film companies will be an- 
nounced by the incorporators within the 
next few weeks. This new amalgamation 
win be headed by men well known in the 
film industry and will be backed by capital 
supplied by men associated with big com- 
mercial manufacturing organizations. The 
producing units of the new combine will 
be companies that have already made pic- 
tures of exceptional merit and have the 
facilities to continue to produce high grade 
features. 



REYNOLDS IS FOX EDITOR 

Sidney Reynolds, who has been scenario 
editor of the Fox Film Corporation since 
its inception, is still in that position, an 
reports to the contrary notwithstanding. 



WORLD GETS FRENCH FILMS % 

World Films has received several high 
class French films, produced under special 
orders, from William A Brady.' It is 
understood a series of elaborate produc- 
tions wUl be soon forthcoming from the 
same source. The first arrivals are "Atone- 
ment" and "A Naked Soul." The latter 
features Suzanne Grandaise, a leading 
French star. Louis Mercanton directed 
the pictures, according to special orders 
from Brady. 



PARALTA PLAYS PROGRESSING 

Robert T. Kane, vice-president of the 
Paralta Plays Corporation, who is in Los 
Angeles supervising the work of the pro- 
duction end of this enterprise, has in- 
formed Carl Anderson, president of the 
corporation, that work is going forward 
very rapidly on two productions, and that 
both studios controlled by the company 
will be in full operation in the course of 
the next three weeks. 



SANGER READY TO PRODUCE 

Eugene Sanger, who has been preaching 
"The Play's the Thing" to picture produc- 
ers for the past ten years, is about ready 
to start producing, and an announcement 
of the stars he has under contract and the 
plays that will be produced under the San- 
ger banner may be looked for by the middle 
of this month. 



SAMWICK FREED OF CHARGE 

• 

Harry Samwick, manager of the Ivan 
Film Co., who was arrested recently on 
the charge of assaulting Ivan Abramson, 
president of the company, was discharged 
by Magistrate Brough in West Side Court 
last week. The case was dismissed through 
lack of evidence. 



TO FILM ATHERTON STORY 

At last a Gertrude Atherton story has 
found its way to the screen and wUl be 
presented in photo play form by the Mutual 
Film Co. "Mrs. Balfame" is the story 
chosen, and Nance O'Neill will lend her 
art to the portrayal of the title role. 



OFFER PRIZE FOR TRADE MARK 

Harry R. Raver, president of Art 
Dramas Incorporated, announced last 
week that his company offered a prize of 
$25 for a design or a suggestion that will 
make an acceptable trade mark. The de- 
sign will be used on an advertising, photo- 
graphs and films. 



METRO HAD NO 
RIGHT TO USE 
SKETCH TITLE 



AUCE BRADY BEATS SCHEDULE 

Alice Brady is now four plays ahead of 
the schedule of World Pictures. These 
are "Maternity," to be published at the 
end of May; "The Divorce Game," for 
July 2; "The Spurs of Sybil" and "The 
Romance of a Self-Made Widow," for Au- 
gust and September. 

UNIVERSAL ENGAGES BALL 

Eustace Hale Ban has been engaged 
by the Universal to arrange a sixteen-part 
serial scenario from Arthur S. Roche's 
story, "The Grey Ghost," which has ap- 
peared in the Saturday Evening Pott. 
Stuart Paton is to direct the picture. 



GENERAL DOUBLING OUTPUT 

The General Film Co. has announced its 
plans of increasing its services, doubling 
its output' of short subjects, especially 
comedies. 



MUST PAY DAMAGES NOW 



METRO RELEASING FOUR FILMS 

Metro Pictures Corporation have four 
screen productions ready to release dur- 
ing the month of May. The first one is 
"Sowers and Reapers," starring Emmy 
Wehlen; to be followed by 'The Soul of 
a Magdalen," starring Mme. Fetrova; 
"The Beautiful Lie," with Frances Nelson 
as star, to be released Mav 21, and for 
the final week "The Greatest Power," 
starring Ethel Barrymore. 



After a trial of two days in the Supreme 
Court Justice Warley M. Platzek has de- 
cided that the Metro Pictures Corp. in- 
fringed on the title rights of a vaudevUle 
sketch called' "The Comeback" when it 
christened a motion picture, manufactured 
by one of their companies, with that title. 
As a result he has granted Paul Dickey an 
injunction which restrains the Metro Com- 
pany from further projection of the picture, 
and will appoint a referee to decide the 
amount of royalty and damages to be 
awarded Dickey, author and owner of the 
vaudeville offering. 

The damages to be assessed upon the 
picture concern are to be based upon the 
earnings of the picture subsequent to April 
24, 1916, when Nathan Burkan, attorney 
for Dickey notified the defendants that they 
were using a title for their picture which 
was similar to the title of a vaudevUle 
sketch Dickey had written and produced 
two years prior to the release of the motion 
picture. 

The Court decided, after the taking of 
testimony in the action, that even though 
there was no similarity of the motion pic- 
ture in plot, business or story to the vaude- 
vUle sketch, the vaudevUle value of the 
sketch had been greatly hurt through the 
projection of a motion picture with a simi- 
lar title. 

The referee, who will be appointed by 
Justice Platzek this week, will go over the 
books of the corporation, and, after learn- 
ing the profits of the picture, win then de- 
termine the amount of damages that the 
plaintiff is entitled to, and will make his 
report to the Court, which will determine 
the amount the plaintiff is entitled to. 

There have been several cases regarding 
similarity of title tried in the New York 
courts during the past three years, but this 
is the first to be decided in favor of the 
plaintiff. 



"CHRISTUS" OPENS FOR RUN 

"Christus," a photo drama of the life 
of Christ, presented by the Historic Fea- 
tures, Inc., opened at the Criterion Thea- 
tre, Monday night, for a run. It proved 
a splendid spectacle. Besides the desert, 
some remarkable views of Biblical places 
are shown. The picture will be released 
to state rights probably after its New 
York run. 



HARRY COHEN BACK 

After having covered 15,000 miles in 
four months as Metro's special representa- 
tive, Harry J. Cohen has returned to New 
York. Cohen left New York December 
20. His trip took him up through British 
Columbia and the North West Territories. 



NEW BEBAN PICTURE FINISHED 

"The MarceUini Millions," the next 
Morosco-Paramount picture, starring 
George Beban, has been completed, and 
is scheduled for release on May 14. The 
stcry was written by Edith Kennedy and 
prepared for the screen by the author and 
Mr. Beban in collaboration. It was di- 
rected by Donald Crisp, who has presided 
over all of Mr. Beban' s recent photoplay 
successes. 



"HER BETTER SELF' COMPLETED 

Pauline Frederick's next Famous 
Players-Paramount production "Her Bet- 
ter Self has been completed under the 
direction of Robert Vignola and is 
scheduled for release by Paramount on 
May 21. In the cast are Thomas Meigban, 
Alice Hollister. Maude Turner Gordon, 
Charles WeUesley, Frank De Rheim and 
Armand Cortex. 



RENEW LASKY CONTRACTS 

One of the first announcements to find 
its way east after the arrival of Jesse 
L. Lasky at bis studio in Hollywood, is 
the announcement that Marshall Nellin 
and George Melford have signed two-year 
contracts to continue directing Lanky-Par 
amount pictures. 



FANNIE WARD IN "UNCONQUERED" 

Fannie Ward, who was last seen upon 
the screen in '"The School for Husbands," 
will next be starred by the Jesse L. Lasky 
Feature Play Co. in "Dnconquered," a 
dramatic story written by Beatrice C. De 
Mille and Leighton Osmun. 



NEXT "ARBUCKLE" MAY 21 

Roscoe ("Fatty") Arbuckle's second 
Paramount comedy will be released May 21. 
The success of "The Butcher Boy" has 
induced the Paramount Pictures Corp. to 
release this second picture just one month 
later. 



GIVES VP "THE BARRIER" 

The General Film Co., in conjunction 
with other' changes, announces it will no 
longer handle "The Barrier." 

It also announces a campaign devoted 
to one and two reel pictures. 



TWO TRIANGLES COMING 

"Souls Triumphant," with Wilfred 
Lucas and Lillian Gish as stars, and 
"Wild Winship's Widow" starring Dorothy 
Dalton, are the Triangle feature releases 
for May 20. 




WILLIAM A. BRADY 

Director -Geaeral 

World pictures): 

Present ■" !y ~Tl 

ALICE BRADY 

In 

"Maternity 



,f> 



Story, by SHANNON FIFE 



36 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



May 2. 1917 



NEWS 



REVIEWS 



STATE RIGHTS 



RE LEAS ES 
FORUM 



WILLIAMSONS 

MAKE WAR ON 

STATE LINES 



TO SPLIT TERRITORIES 



Another demonstration of the growing 
tendency to split up old-established state 
rights territories and apportion them as 
"zones," instead of states, for the opera- 
tion of the buyers of film franchises, is 
given this week by the Williamson Broth- 
ers. This enterprise puts itself unquali- 
fiedly on record as supporters of the belief 
that state boundaries for state rights buy- 
ers have become obsolete. 

The Williamsons indorse thus the new 
theories that found their first expression 
several weeks ago in The New 1'ork 
Cejppkx. 

To sell picture rights according to the 
facility and distributing powers of the 
buyer, and not by old-established state di- 
visions, is the decision of the Williamsons 
in their release of "The Submarine Eye," 
the first production to be issued by this 
company. 

Discussing the plan to release the pic- 
ture to territorial buyers, George William- 
son mentioned several interesting details. 
The company may reserve several districts 
for its own direct management, but it will 
deal with buyers throughout the rest of the 
country with a broad policy. 

TO keep in close touch with the buyers 
after they have obtained the territorial 
rights, and to continue a strong- advertising 
campaign for them, will be part of the com- 
pany's efforts. 

Victor Johnson, sales manager for the 
Williamsons, talked in strong terms of the 
company's decision to broaden the field of 
distribution for its products. The war 
against arbitrary territorial boundaries, 
conforming to the boundaries of states and 
groups of states he crystallized in an at- 
tack on the phrase "state rights." 

"Ah a matter of efficiency anil sound 
business," he said, J*the term 'territorial 
rights' should be adopted universally in- 
stead of 'state rights.' A territory should 
be apportioned not with reference to state 
lines which were laid down by geographers 
seventy-five years ago, or by the geologic 
formation of mountains and twists of 
muddy streams through generations, but 
by economic conditions and railroads. 

"It is logical and proper for a distributor 
to construct an independent territory com- 
prising one city, or a group of 'cities radi- 
ating from a central point within part of 
one state or lapping over into three states. 

"The only controlling influences should 
be the distributor's record as a business 
man, his capability for serving a given zone 
of operation and the prima facie evidence 
that a cohesive collection of theatres exist 
in the clientele of the distributor." 

Mr. Williamson's official statement of 
policy includes details of a plan to keep a 
"leading string" on the territorial buyers 
by leasing and not selling the prints. 



BERNSTEIN JOINS HOFFMAN 

M. H. Hoffman wired from Los Angeles 
several days ago that he had signed a 
contract to handle all the Bernstein film 
productions. This transaction strikes the 
high watermark of state rights news and 
the announcement aroused considerable in- 
terest in state rights circles. 

The M. H. Hoffman Co., Inc., recently 
established to handle "The Sin Woman" 
and forthcoming products of the George 
Backer Oo., is now able to exploit a trio 
of elaborate pi ctur es. The first Bernstein 
releases are "Who Knows I" and "The 
Seven Cardinal Virtues." Hoffman will 
use the trademark "Foursquare Pictures" 
on his products. W. A. Bach, recently 
Canadian exchange manager for the Uni- 
versal, has become sales manager fox 
Hoffman. 



STATE RIGHTS BUYERS HERE 

Among the State rights buyers who were 
in town last week were: 
Harry Schwalbe, of Philadelphia. 
J. E. Pearee, of New Orleans. 
Aaron Jones, of Chicago. 
E. Mandelbaum, of Philadelphia. 
H. S. Siege], of Boston. 
R. G. Fields, of Detroit 
Harry Nolan, of Denver. 
E. H. Hulsey, of Dallas. 
Arthur Blankmayer, of Detroit. 
J. A. Kressy, from Dallas. 
Abe Warner, of Cleveland. 
B. Amsterdam, of Philadelphia. 



ITALIAN FILMS ARRIVE 

Stanley Blumenthal, brother of Benja- 
min Blumenthal ,who manages the Ex- 
port and Import Film Co., arrived from 
Italy this week with an Impressive col- 
lection of six-reel feature films. Several 
of the pictures feature Lydia Borrelli, 
known, in point of vogue, as the Mary 
Pickford of Europe, and Novelli, the fa- 
mous tragedian. These pictures are re- 
ported to have made smashing hits before 
European audiences. 



COSMOFOTOF1LM SPREADS OUT 

On account of an increase in business, 
which doesn't make it angry, the Cos- 
mofotofilm Co. moved this week from its 
offices at 110 West Fortieth Street to 
more spacious quarters in the Candler 
Building, 220 West Forty-second Street. 
The "Cosmo" is alarming its special feature 
film competitors with "The Manxman." 
Heavy prices are recorded for the sale 
of territories for this film. 



WARNERS HAVE NEW POLICY 

On June 10th Warner Brothers will 
release a five-reel picture with which they 
inaugurate a policy of twenty-six flve- 
reelers per year. State rights are now 
being disposed of and most of the ter- 
ritory has been asked for. The first pic- 
ture, which has not yet been named, will 
feature Holbrook Blinn and Mabel Trun- 
nelle, the second Clifford Bruce and Mar- 
guerite Snow. 



"WARNING" TERRITORY GOING 

The state rights privileges for "Warn- 
ing" the moral problem motion picture 
being released by the Photodrama Film 
Corp., have been disposed of for all of 
the eastern section of the country. There 
are a few territories open in the middle 
west and Canada. The scenario for this 
picture was written by the Rev. Dr. Chan, 
H. Parkhurst 



PIONEER HAS 3 NEW FILMS 

The Pioneer Feature Film Company 
has released the following pictures during 
the last month: "The Slave Mart," 
featuring Marguerite Snow; "The Web 
of Life," featuring Hilda Nord and James 
Cruze; "Marvelous Maciste," featuring 
the black man in "Cabirla." 



ANDERSON MEETS BUYERS 

Carl Anderson, president of the Paralta 
Plays, Inc., held a meeting with state 
rights buyers last Thursday. A second 
conference will be held Thursday of this 
week, Anderson reports the Paralta plan 
of distribution is meeting with high favor. 



"BIRTH" TO BE STATE RIGHTED 

The Eugenic Film Co. has engaged a 
number of theatres throughout the country 
in which to show "Birth," a motion pic- 
ture based on "motherhood," prior to 
offering the state rights territories in those 
sections for sale. 



MAY STATE RIGHT NEW FILM 

. "The Hand That Rocks the Cradle," the 
new Lois Weber-Philips Smalley produc- 
tion, arrived in New York last week. It 
is likely that the Universal will dispose 
of it on a state rights basis. 



$103,000 PAID TO 
LEWIS FOR HIS 
"BAR SINISTER" 

FILM COST HTM $17,000 

Edgar Lewis electrified the state rights 
market last week by collecting $103,000 
for a picture that cost him $17,000 to pro- 
duce. The sale was made to Prank G. 
Hall of Newark. The subject of the trade 
was "The Bar Sinister." 

Though it may not be without precedent, 
the size of the purchasing price and the 
vast margin of profit in this deal are. thor- 
oughly unusual, even in an industry that 
is full of startling harvests of gold. 

Mr. Lewis stands in this transaction as 
an example of the heights to which a man 
with mental equipment can climb in the 
film industry. The incident testifies to the 
generosity of rewards in the state rights 
division of the business. 

As a young man Mr. Lewis had the se- 
rious occupation of driving mules in 
Missouri. He pulled himself out of this 
stratum by natural ability and will power. 
He became an actor. It wasn't over four 
years ago that he entered the film field as 
an actor with the Reliance company, draw- 
ing $5 a day. Soon he became a combina- 
tion actor-director. 

Then he swung to the Life Photo Film 
Co. and produced the "Littlest Rebel." It 
was a great big hit. Thereafter he pro- 
duced "Captain Swiftwind," another hit. 
When creating hits became a habit with 
Lewis, he began to produce for LuWu. In 
rapid succession he brought forth "The 
Barrier" and "The Great Divide." These 
two pictures are bywords in the industry. 

Finally Lewis put across "The Bar Sin- 
ister," for himself, and, as has been noted, 
sold it for $103,000. A secondary element 
in this deal that possesses interest, is that 
Mr. Hall almost immediately turned the 
' film hack to the hands of Abrams and 
Werner, who transacted the original trade 
for Lewis, giving them a commission to 
distribute the product. 



"JOSEPH" FOR STATE RIGHTERS 

The Concord Feature Film Co., of which 
E. Marks is president, closed a contract 
this week for the American rights to 
"Joseph and His Brethren," to be re- 
leased on the state rights basis. This pic- 
ture, a full six-reel production, received a 
brief trade showing about two years ago. 
The original drama ran for a year and a 
half at the Century Theatre. 



LESSER CANCELS SELZNICK 

Sol L. Lesser, of the All-Star Features 
Distributors, has sent to Lewis J. Selz- 
nick a cancellation of his contract to 
handle the Clara Kimball Young produc- 
tions. Mr. Leaser announces he was com- 
pelled to do this because of the necessity 
to concentrate on his group of big features 
previously acquired. 



HALL STARTS COMPANY 

Frank G. Hall, of Newark, N. J., who 
recently purchased the world rights to 
"The. Bar Sinister," has established the 
Frank Hall Productions, Inc., to operate 
on a large scale. The company will occupy 
offices in the Longacre building, New York. 



"WOMAN AND THE BEAST" SHOWN 

Fifty state rights buyers last week wit- 
nessed the first trade showing of "The 
Woman and the Beast," produced by 
Graphic Features. The film paased the 
censors without a change. 



P ALLEY BUYS COMEDY RIGHTS 

J. Pallcy, of Detroit, has bought the 
state rights for his district to the King 
Bee Billy West comedy "Back Stage."' 



NEW FEATURE FILMS 
OFFERED THIS WEEK 
TO STATE RIGHTERS 

New state rights releases announced 
this week are: 

Corona Cinema Co., Los Angeles, Cal. — 
"The Curse of Eve." 

Ililler & Wilk, Inc., Longacre Bldg.,New 
York City— "The Battle of Gettysburg"; 
"The Wrath of the Gods." 

Ivan Film Productions, 130 West 46th 
Street, New York— "One Law For Both." 

The A. Kay Co., 720 Seventh Avenue, 
New York — "Terry Feature Burlesques"; 
"Terry Human Interest Reel"; "Golden 
Spoon Mary." 

Other current and pending releases in 
the open market are: 

Today Feature Film Corporation — 
"To-day." 

Gold Medal Photoplayers— "The Web of 
Life." 

Exclusive Features, Inc. — "The Liar." 

Cinema War News Syndicate — "'Amer- 
ican War News Serial." 

Ones Film Co.— "The Fated Hour." 

Sheriott Pictures, Corp.— "The Black 
Stork.** 

Max Cohen Co.— "The Fury of Civili- 
zation," and "America Is Ready." 

Edward Warren Co.— "The Warfare of 
the Flesh." 

Cosmofotofllm Co.— "The Manx-Man." 

Bernstein Film Productions — "Who 
Knows T" in preparation; "The Seven 
Cardinal Virtues." 

Frohman Amusement Co. — "God's Man." 

B. W. Copeland — "The Pendleton 
Round-up of 1016." 

Arrow Film Corporation — "The Deem- 
ster." 

M. H. Hoffman Co. — "The Sin Woman." 

Popular Pictures Corporation — "A 
Woman Wills"; "The Princess of India"; 
"The Burglar and the Lady"; "The Little 
Orphan"; "Ignorance." 

Hoffman Film Co.— "Buffalo Bill's Last 
Performance." 

De Luxe Spoilers Co.— "The (De Luxe) 
Spoilers." 

Balboa Amusement . Producing Co. — 
"The Twisted Thread." 

Graphic Features — "The Woman and the 
Beast." 

Abrams and Werner — "The Bar Sin- 
ister." 

E. I. S. Motion Picture Corporation — 
"Trooper 44." 

Sol L. Lesser— "The Ne'er-Do- Well." 

LaSalle Film Co.— "Lafco Comedies." 

Grand Feature Film Co.— "Rex' Beach 
Himself." 

Enlightenment Photoplays Corporation 
—"Enlighten Thy Daughter." 

Hanover Film Co.— "How Uncle Sam 
Prepares." 

Ultra Pictures Corporation — "The 
Woman Who Dared" 

Flora Finch Comedy Films Corpora- 
tion— "War Prides." 

Variety Films — "The Price of Her 
Soul." 

Eugenic Film Co.— "Birth." 

Williamson Bros. — "The Submarine 
Eye." 

Shermann-Elliott, Inc.— 'The Crisis." 

Universal Film Co.— "God's Law." 

Benjamin Chapin Studios — "The Lin- 
coln Cycle." 

CHAIN GETS PRODUCERS 

At least one, and very probably two, 
producing organizations signed contracts, 
as subsidiaries, early this week of the 
First National Exhibitors' Circuit, the for- 
mation of which has been reported in This 
Clipper. 

It is understood that the producing 
companies have agreed to supply the new 
chain organization with a nucleus of big; 
films, which the latter can use to control 
the State rights field. The exchange 
numbers about 50 members, who control 
$20,000,000 worth of motion picture the- 
atres, according to official report. It was 
incorporated under New York State laws, 
with a capital of $80,000. 



May 2, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



37 



FEATURE FILM REPORTS 



"WITHIN THE LAW" 

Vitagraph. Nine reels. 
Cast. 

Mary Turner Alice Joyce 

Joe Garson Harry Morey 

Aggie Lynch Adele DeGarde 

Mr.- Oilier Anders Randolf 

Dick Gilder Walter McQrail 

Inspector Burke... Eugene O'Rourke 

District Attorney Robert Gaillard 

Helen Morris Billie Billing* 

Sarah Mies Bunco 

Detective Cassidy Joe Donohue 

English Eddie Bernard RandaU 

Tom Daeey Bernard Seigel 

Story — From the stage success by Bayard 
Veillcr. Produced under the personal 
supervision of J. Stuart Blackton. Di- 
rected by William P. S. Earle. Photo- 
graphed by Clark R. Nickerson. 
Action — Smooth and natural. 
Continuity — Consistent. 
Suspense— Intense. 
Detail — Perfect. 
Atmosphere — Real. 
Photography — Excellent. 

Remarks. ' ' 

In presenting "Within the Law" the 
Greater Vitagraph has given to the screen 
a criterion for future dramatic master- 
pieces. The picturized version of Bay- 
ard Veillcr's great play is a distinct 
artistic achievement and a great personal 
triumph for Alice Joyce and Harry Morey. 

Throughout the entire length of the 
production there is not one moment in 
which interest is not intense. The sus- 
pense is timed to a nicety. The big 
moments are approached naturally and 
are carried with a smoothness that com- 
pels conviction. 

The production is beautifully set, and 
. what is more important, is perfectly cast 
throughout. Great care is shown In the 
selection of the supporting players, both 
aa to type and their ability to portray the 
parts assigned to them. 

Alice Joyce makes a perfect Mary Tur- 
ner and Harry Morejns performance as 
Joe Garson is easily one of the finest 
charactcrizationi) he has given since "A 
Million Bid." 

In its present form the production runs 
well over two hours, and it is difficult to 
see how it can be cut down without hurt-, 
ing the perfect continuity. 

Box Office Value. 
Will attract and hold every class of 
audience. Can be played for very long 
runs. 

"MORAL COURAGE" 

Released May 14. 

World. Five Seels. 

Cast. 

Mary MoOlinton Muriel Ostriehe 

Chadidck Anton .4 rlhur Ashley 

Joshua Anion Edward Elko* 

Willie McDonald Clarence Elmer 

August MoOlinton Robert Forsyth 

Nancy Somert .Julia Stuart 

Baggot Richard Turner 

Walter Green Edmund Oobo 

Action — Interesting. 
Continuity — Logical. 
Detail — Good. 
Atmosphere — Effective. 
Photography— Good. 

Remarks. 

"Moral Courage" is an unusual and 
charming story. 

Muriel Ostriche, in the leading role, as 
Mary McClinton, portrays splendidly the 
character of a Scotch lassie, who works as 
a "hand" in a Connecticut mill,, and mar- 
ries the son of the cannle Scotchman who 
owns it. Joshua disinherits the boy, and 
the latter, as often happens refreshingly in 
such cases, right away quick wins a for- 
tune. 

The play gets away from the ordinary 
portrayals of factory life. Many of the 
scenes are laid in one of the largest mills 
of Connecticut. 

Box Office Value. 

Worth two days in any theatre. 



"ONE LAW FOR BOTH" 

State rights feature. 

A Drama in Two Episodes. Eight Keels. 

Ivan Film Productions. 

Cast. 

Elga Pulaski Rita J olivet 

Helen Hutchinson Leah Baird 

Renee Doucet Margaret Greene 

Magda Strunski Helen Arnold 

Ossip Pulaski James Morrison 

Norman Hutchinson Vincent Serrano 

Count de Fernac Pedro de Cordoba 

Baron Jan Slazek Paul Capellani 

Sergeious Gourko Anders Randolf 

Feodor Wolslei Hassan Mussali 

Henri Walter Gould 

Story— Written and directed by Ivan 

Abramson. Camera work by Marcel A. 

Le Picard. 
Action — Rapid and plentiful. / 

Continuity— Well handled. 
Detail — Good. 
Atmosphere — Accurate. 
Photography — Flawless. 

Remarks. 

Two hours are packed full of romance 
and the struggles of fine character for the 
person who sees "One Law for Both," the 
eight-reel photo-drama which was shown 
Monday to the trade. Ivan Abramson, who 
wrote the play and directed it, has accom- 
plished wonders in painting this story on 
the screen with full detail and yet without 
bewildering his audience. 

The story embraces the social and eco- 
nomic life of two continents with strong 
collisions of character, big plot and counter 
plot. It is portrayed so well that the 
spectator has a complete grip on the prog- 
ress of events and responds fully to each 
successive surprise. 

The play should have particular appeal 
at this time by reason of the recent revolu- 
tion in Russia, for the brewing of the 
revolt Is part of the story. 

"One Law for Both" argues that an 
equal standard should govern both sexes, 
and should apply likewise in economic af- 
fairs to the high and the low. 

Rita Jolivet, as Elga Pulaski, fills with 
great power the role of the orphan daugh- 
ter of noble parents, who sacrifices her 
honor to save her brother and a group of 
revolutionists. The story revolves round 
her. 

Having saved her compatriots by pur- 
chasing their pardon from the governor gen- 
eral with her honor, she slays the spy who 
won her affections, only to betray the revo- 
lutionists. Elga's brother shoulders the 
blame as murderer, and Elga again makes 
a loathsome trade with the governor gen- 



eral, this time to get a passport for her 
brother. 

The next episode brings the principal 
characters to America. The plea of one 
law for both is fulfilled when Elga's hus- 
band, discovering the darkness of her past, 
forgives. 

Box Office Value. 

It is sure to thrive. 



VAN LOAN OPENS OFFICE 
H. H. Van Loan has opened an office 
in the Godfrey building and, under the 
name of Van Loan and Shepard, will 
handle publicity and advertising for sev. 
eral film companies. H. J. Shepard, for- 
merly of the Universal Film Company, is 
Van's partner. 



ELSIE FERGUSON FOR FILMS 

Elsie Ferguson will shortly conclude 
her tour in "Shirley Kaye," and immedi- 
ately begin work on her first play before 
the screen, which will be "Barbary Sheep," 
hv Robert Hitchens. 



MAE MURRAY WORKING ON FILM 

Mae Murray is at work on a photo- 
play version of George Middleton e "At 
First Sight," which is being staged in the 
Famous Players studio by arrangement 
with Jesse Leaky. Robert Leonard is in 
charge of the filming of the production. 



m 



'Jne Greatest Melodrama 
' Ever Staged 

"WITH I N 

TH E LAW 

Bayajxl\eiJJer / s Phenomenal 
Success That Ran lor Sixteen 
Months On Broadway 
A 

SPECIAL DLUE MB BON FEATURE, 

^ ALICE JOYCE, 
HARRY MOREY 

And An All Star Vitagraph Cast 

AfThe Broadway Theatre.New York. NOW. 
\ /-GREATER— II 

VITAGRAPrl 



* 




Production of 



"The Bar Sinister" 

a story of the South by Anthony P. Kelly 

"WILL LIVE AS A FILM IN THE WAY THAT O. HENRY'S TALES OF EVERYDAY LIFE LIVE, AND IN THE SAME WAY THAT 
EDNA FERBER-S STORIES OF SIMPLE INCIDENTS ARE DEAR TO HER READERS." 

MISS HOSTETTER, THE BILLBOARD. 



World Rights Sold to 

FRANK C. HALL 

Newark, N. S. 



Distributors 
ABKAMS * WERNER 

Candlsr Bldx, N. Y. City 



In preparation— THE GOLDEN WOMAN 



38 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



May 2, 1917 



CHARLES 



IRENE 



KEEFE I SHAW 

NOW IN VAUDEVILLE 

DIRECTION SILLY ATWELL 



RUCKER and WINFRED 

TWO EBONY-HUED ENTERTAINERS 

MUCHEE BIG HIT IN VAUDEVILLE 
Ebony: — "Dat Chink am no patrimony of mine." 
Sine Sob: — "Meliky tan likee all spot. Me stay all aamee." 



jobmk KENNY and LaFRANCE -» 

Direction TOM JONES 



PREMIER DANCERS 



FRANCES DOUGHERTY 

Assisted by 

BOBBY LUCEY At Piano 

In A LITTLE BIT OF EVERYTHING Direction THOS. FTTZPATRICK 



AIM IMA MARIE 



DAINTY COMEDIENNE 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



VIRGINIA KELSY 

DOUBLE VOICE PRIMA DONNA 



HERBERT 



TRDCIE 



HOEY ^d SMITH 



COMEDY — SONG — DANCE 



Direction, JACK LEWIS 



4FI.8 
of Ragtime 



In Wm. B. Friedlander's Inc.. "The Suffragette Revue." 
Under Personal Management BART. H. McHUGH ' 



Featured with Menlo Moore's 

'LITTLE MISS UP-TO-DATE 



MARTY 



COLLINS & WEST 



MARION 



SINGING, DANCING, COMEDY TALKER 



Direction, WENONAH TENNEY 



CH AS. E. LEWIS 



With Black & While Revue, U. B. 0. 



While pUylnr Milwaukee with Winston'* Semis, Eddie M»lle remarked to Mr. Winston: "If you 

should go to war with your animals, you would have no trouble con < ****! > ing yourself from 

t4iaa> Mieni* ** Vrui'll kaua -r. iln Le tter ek.n s-haa*- VAAi~ 



the enemy.** You'll have to do better than that, Eddie. 



TENNEY 



like the Parcel Post "delivers the roods." Acts, sketches, and monologues, written 
right. They're 'all of originality, "pep" and "get-over." Don't wish far a O00D 
set, have Teaser write yon one. Correspondence solicited. 

ALT/EN SPENCER TEsTHZT, Ko. 14M Broadway, Kew York <Ht?. 



BOBBY BERNARD 

Featured Comedian with Wm. B. Friedlander's Suffragette Roma 
THE COMEDY FIND OF THE SEASON 



NORMAN & IDA TAYLOR 



12K in 1 or 2. 



In A LAUGHING ABSURDITY 

•OFFICER SIX, SIX, 7/8" 



"IN VAUDEVILLE" 



SHOW ROUTES 

(Continued from page 31.) 
MINSTRELS 

DeRue Bros. — Vincent, N. Y., 2; Adams, 3: 
Camden, 4 ; Mexico, 5 : Pulaski, 7 ; Sacketta 
Harbor, 8 ; Clayton, ; Theresa, 10 ; Ham- 
mond, 11 ; Ogdensbnrg, 12. 

Georgia Troubadours (Wm. McCabe, mgr.) — 
Iroquois, S. D., May 2; Miller, 3-4; High- 
more, 5. 

Huntington's, F. C. (J. W. West, gen. mgr.) 
— Somerset, Ky., May 4 ; Lexington, Kv., 
5-6 ; Georgetown, 7 ; Cyntniana, 8. 

CARNIVALS 

Brnndage, S. W„ Shows — Hannibal, Mo., 30- 

ilay 5. 
Clifton-Kelly Shows — Flat River, Mo., 30- 

Moy 6. 
Copping, Harry, Shows — Punxsutawney, Pa., 

Clark & Co'nklin Shows — Covington, Ky., 30- 
May 5. 

Dreamland Expo. Shows — Matoka, W. Va., 
30-May 5. 

Ferari, Col. Francis — Elyria, O., 30-May 5. 

Ferati, Jos. G. — Bridgeton, N. J., 30-May 5. 

Greater Sheesley Shows-^Ellzabetb, N. J., 30- 
May 5. 

Great Excelsior Shows — Crelghton, Pa., 30- 
May 5. 

Great American Shows — Dayton, O., 30-May S. 

Great Cosmopolitan Shows — Duquoln, 111., 30- 
May 5. 

Great Northern Shows — Sante Fe, N. Mex., 
30-May 5. 

Heinz Bros. Sbows — Galesburg, 111., 30-May 5. 

Hopper Greater Shows — Hamlin, Tex., 30- 
May 5. 

Leavitt & Taxler Shows United — Jersey City, 
N. J., 30-May 5. 

Monarch Shows — Rensselaer, Ind., 30-May 5. 

Morrison United Sbows — Pittsburgh, 30-May 
5. 

Morrison United Sbows — Pittsburg, 30-May 5. 

National Expo. Shows — Masontown, Pa., 
30-May 5. 

Relss, Nat. Sbows — E. Chicago, Ind., 30- 
May 5. 

Washburn's, Leon W., Midway Shows — Wil- 
mington, Del., 30-May 5. 

World at Home Shows— Waterbury, Conn., 
30-May 5. 

Wortham Bros. Shows — Okla. City, Okla. 30- 
May S. 

Zeldman & Pollle Shows — Grand Rapids, 
Mich., 30-May 5. 

Kami's Greater Monarch Shows — Newark, N. 
.1., 30-May 5. 

CIRCUSES 

Barn urn & Bailey — Phlla., 30-May 5. 

Barnes, Al. G. — Medford, Ore.: May 2, Grant's 
Pass. 3 : Roseburg, 4 : Cottage Grove. 3 ; 
Mapleton, 6; Myrtle Point, 7; Marshlield, 
8; Engene, 9; Albany, 10; Salem, 11; Mc- 

Mllllivllle, 12, 

Cole Bros. — Evanston, Wyo., May 2 : Rock 

Springs, 8 ; Kemmerer, 4 ; Montpeller, 

Idaho, 5. 
Haconbeek-Wallace — Huntington, W. Va., 

May 2 ; Farkersburg, 3 ; Athens, O., 4 ; 

Delaware, S. 
Rlngling Bros. — St. Louis, May 1-5; Miracle, 

Ind., 7 ; SprlngOeld, < >., 8 ; Zanesvllle. ; 

Marietta 10: Clarksburg, W, Va., 11 : Cum- 
berland. Ind., 12. 
Sells-FIoto Shows— Coffeyville, Kan., May 2 ; 

Pittsburg 3 ; Joplln, Mo., 4 : Parsons, Kan., 

5 ; Indianapolis, 14. 
Wlllnrd. Jess & Buffalo BUI Show — Brooklyn, 

30-May 5 ; Newark, N. J., 7 ; Faterson, 8 ; 

Easton, Pa., ; Wllkes-Barre, 10 ; Scranton, 

12; BlngbamtOD, N. T., 13. 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Bragg's Big Feature Show (Geo. M. Bragg. 

mgr.)— Rumney, N. H., 30-May 5. 
Smith. Mysterious (Albert P. Smith, mgr.) — 

Caledonia. Minn.. May 2-3; Gnttenberg, la., 

5-6: McGregor, 7-8; Elkader. 9-10; Volga 

City, 11. 

BANDS AND ORCHESTRAS 

Tinker's Singing Orchestra — Mechanic Falls, 
Me., May 2 ; Saco, 3 ; Sanford, 4 ; Auburn, 
5 : Wlnthrop, 7 ; Waterville. 8 : Bingham, 
9; Madison, 10; Corinna. 11; Bangor, 12. 

DRAMATIC AND MUSICAL 

Adams, Maude (Chas. Frohman, Inc., nigra.) 
. — Empire, New York, 30-May 5. 

Arllss, Geo. — Knickerbocker, New York, lndef. 

Bates, Blanche (T. H. Hunter, Inc., mgr.) 
— Altoona, Pa.. May 6. 

Barrio's, J. M., Plays (Cbas. Frohman, Inc., 
mgrs.) — Empire, New York, May 7-lndef. 

"Bosom Friends" (Lew Fields, mgr.) — Liber- 
ty, New York, indef. 

"Big Sbow, The" (Chas. B. Dillingham, 
mgr.) — Hip, New York, 30-May 5. 

'•Boomerang. The" (David Belasco, mgr.) — 
Powers. Chicago, indef. 

"Brat, The" (Oliver Morosco, mgr.) — Harris, 
New York, lndef. 

"Beautiful Unknown, The" (The Shuberts, 

mgrs.) Boston, indef. 

Collier, Wm. (H. H. Fraxee, mgr.) — Long- 

. acre, New York, lndef. . 
Cowl, Jane (Selwyn A- Co., mgrs.) — El tinge. 

New York, lndef. 
Clarke, Harry Corson and Margaret Dale 

Owen — Calcutta, India, indef. 
"Come Out of the Kitchen" (Klaw A Er- 

langer & Henry Miller, mgrs.) — Cohan's, 

New York, 30-May 5. 
"Canary Cottage" (Oliver Morosco, mgr.) — 

Morosco, New York, lndef. 
"Case of Lady Camber" (Chas. Frohman, Inc., 

mgrs.) — Lvcenm, New York, 80-May 5. 
"Cinderella Man, The" — Chicago, Indef. 
"Country Cousin, The" — Broad, Philadelphia, 

lndef. 
Daly, Arnold (David Belasco, mgr.) — Belasco, 

New York. 30-May 5. 



MADISON'S BUDGET No.16 

has pot many a performer Into the business 
— and kept him there. Contents Include 12 
original monologues, 8 great acts for two 
males and 7 for male and female, a bright 
Irish act for three people, 20 sure-fire paro- 
dies, 4 professional minstrel first-parts, a 
screaming tabloid comedy; also hundreds of 
nifty gags and funny sidewalk bits. MADI- 
SON'S BUDGET No. IS costs ONE DOLLAR. 
JAKES MADISON, 1062 Third Avenne, Kew 
York. . . 



STOCK MANAGERS TAKE NOTICE 

"THE COWARD" 

A 4 act western drama with a punch* in each 
act. Cast 6 and 4. Great part for your two 
leads. Your leading man can't be bad in this 
play. (Actor Proof.) Great after draft to this 
one and a fine repeater. Address I. E. EARLE. 
Cincinnati, Ohio, Apartment 12,. Greenwood 
Court, Avondale. 

Wanted^ 

To Support Besse Dainty j 

People In all lines; also artist- capable of play- 
ing small parts for permanent stock. Two 
bills weekly. -Etta Delmas, wire, if at liberty. 
Address I. E. EARLE, Cincinnati, Ohio; 
Greenwood Court, Avondale, Appartment 12. 

Telephone 4219 Greeley 

FIRST CLASS HALL 
FOR REHEARSALS 

436 West 38th Street 

(Near 9th Ave.) 
Suitable for rehearsuiB* productions of all 
Stage, piano, etc. Terms Reasonable. 



SCRIPTS WANTED 

Short cast scripts wanted; will buy or lease. 
LEO HICKEY, care Upton & Martin Real 
Estate Co., Paris, Texas. 

SISTER TEAM and CHORUS GIRL 

wanted for big time act to open soon. All week. 
MOB. J. LTTBIN, Merry Maid Minstrels, Jfntnal 
Hall, 458 8th Ave., New York City. 

WANTED QUICK 

MAYHALL BROS. STOCK CO. 

Under the big tent. People in all lines. 
Al director, comedian, general baa. man. All 
most do specialties. Musicians for B. A O. State 
all first letter. Rehearsals May 14. 

MAYHAIi BROS,, Marceline, Mo. 



ACTS 



PLAYS, SKETCHES WRITTEN 

Terms for a stamp. 

E. L. GAMBLE. Playwright, 
Eaat Liverpool, O. 



FUNNYBONE No.5 ;; 



on ' Ideal encyclo- 
pedia of comedy ma- 
terial. It furnishes quantity sod quality— and at 
a minimum price. Its pages contain sore-fire 
monologues, sketches, parodies, minstrel flrst-psrts, 
50 side-walk gags and a tabloid farce for 8 people. 
FDNNVBONE No. 5 coats 35c; or will send any 
two Issues for 50 cents, any 3 for 75 cents, any 
4 for |1: or FUNNYBONE 1. 2. 3, 4 and 5 for 
11.25. FUITNYBONE PUBLISHrNO 00., No. 1068 
Third Avenue, New York (Dept. C). 



Account of other l-uslness will sell money mak- 

L™ .. DISC-PIN BOWLING GAME. °SidS 

In any amusement park. Cbance of lifetime. Cheap 
If bought at once. HAUSSMANN, 1361 Webster 
Ave,, Bronx. 



AT LIBERTY 

Al Versatile Comedian 

Dramatic, Musical Comedy or Burlesque, Ap- 
pearance, ability, sober, reliable. HeigOt 5 ft. 
6 in., weight 125, age 28. Lead numbers, some 
dancing. Address EARLE WINTON, 47* Pearl 
St, BuffjJo, N. Y. 

r Cjlv SxVaLsaCe Guaranteed Quality 

ASBESTOS CURTAINS 

AMELIA GRAIN 

819 Spring Garden St. Philadelphia, Pa . 

WASTED USDER CANVAS, Issertstra. lfiairism,- sH 
Lints B. A 0. and B. and Stair, B. * 0. Leader: LesdUnT 
Women elth coed dollar lake. Brhrsmli Mar 14,-oam 
24. Will buy complete tent outfit, mat he cheap tad la 
food condition. J. R. AFrLECATE. Wlssssr SttN, 
Lltcela, Rear. 



May 2, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



39 




QUICK 



Deliveries of Costumes, fights and Wigs 



We are Maonfactnrers 



Send 15c. {or Finely 
___ Illustrated Catalogue 

^^^~ Our Rantal Department Contain* Over M«e Cualii—ee 
MOW REAOYI Jack W.Wi Mm.tr J Job Book 
No. 1. A Big Hit. 25c Postpaid 
Wo carry four complete line* of Mako Up 

COSTUME WORKS {£*£>.. %Z%L>fl CHICAGO, 0. S. A. 



CHICAGO 



PLAYS 



FOR STOCK, REPERTOIRE, AMATEUR COMPANIES 

LARGEST ASSORTMENT IN THE WORLD. Book* for home 

amusement, Negro Plays, Paper, Scenery, Mrs. Jarley'a Wax 

Works. Catalogue Freel Free! Free! 

SAMUEL FRENCH. 



a West M«h St, New York 



^ack of the NAME 

Jd STANDS ..^ 



D) TtVlftD'C \ 




TAYLOR'S 
No. 2 

CIRCUS 
SPECIAL 

TRUNK 



This trunk has 
In prorcmeot* 
that will b • 
sure to Interest 
you. Onarsn- 
teed non-leak- 

able and will giro serrtee for a good 

many Tears. 

Bend for full particulars and our NBW 
1817 CATALOGUE. 

C. A. TAYLOR TRUNK WORKS 
CM N. Halstaa St, Cakaga, 1U. 
ZM W. 44th St. New York, N. Y. 




PLAYS 



Large List of 
New Profes- 
sions I and 
Amateur Flays, Vaudeville Sketch- 
es. Staee Monologues, New Min- 
strel Materiiil. Jokes, Hnnd-Bookn 
Operettas, Folk Dances, Musical 
Piece*. Special Entertainment*, 



Tslifsaiii. 

Other Make .OB 

T. 8. 0ENISON at CO. 



P.ccitation*. DialognM, Sneaker*. 
Dlffk, Wag*. BearoVCraaa* PalnU and 
ka-up Gonos. CATALOGUE FREE. 
ISON*VCO_ OEPT.17. CHICAGO 

WIGS, TOUPEES, GREASE. 
PAINT, ETC 

Send for Price List 
G. SHINDHELM, It* West aseh St, N. Y. 





OFFICIAL 
DOCTOR 


N. 


V. A. 


Dr. 


William H. 


Goldberg 




233 WEST 


■3rd 


STREET 


Tel. SC28 Schuyler 




NEW YORK 



WARDROBE PROP 
TRUNKS, $5.00 

Big Bargain. Heve been meed. Alto • few 
Second Hand Innovation and Fibre Ward- 
robe Trunk*. J10 and 115. A fear extra large 
Property Trank*. Also old Taylor Trunk, 
and Bal Trunks. 
Parlor Floor. II W. 11 *t St. Now York city 



I IY1ILLER 



Satmslr^rx>i-?.mstocIiiri 
all colors. Entire compan- 
|i«t fitted in 24 hours. 
'Stage and Street shoe 
t is satisfied here 



155^1 b LUfly . n. y. 



IJETCC HIOH-<3RAO>f 
nCiOO MAKEUP 

UIIO BY THC STARS POM St TSARS. 

COI1UHI. HAIR AMD DSPARTHSNT 
STORKS THROUSHOUT TMB UWTID 
STATSS AND CANADA. AT SOFUaJW 
SRJSKS. ■ 

Thi Hsss Co.. rocmkstbr. n.V. 




CROSS & BANTA 

Show 
F*plnting 

AT right prices 

501 S. Dearborn CHICAGO 

DON LENO Wi ," P^are you for stage 
■**w*.evjn ■'"'Tjnci screen. Cl.nn, con- 
stantly iorming. We guarantee positions to 
graduates free. All branches of Dancing and 
Acting tsught Reasonable rates. 140 west 
44th Street, New York. Bryant 1194. 

TIGHTS 

Cotton Tights, eery good quality, 
a Dilr 90c. Wonted Tights, 
medium weight, 32.00 a pair. 
Wonted Tights, hesey weight, 
$2.75 a pair. Imported silk 
plaited tights, in bright Red sod 
golden Brown, only 12.30 a 
pair. SUkollne Tights In all 
colors, 92.50 a pair. Heavy 75 
per cent. Imported silk lights. 
In hrtght ra) only, reduced from 
te.oo to tt.no a pair. Pull 
sleete Shirts to match tights, 
same price as tights. Orders 
filled promptly. Clipper Catalog 
free on application. 

BERNARD tVaANDL, 

210. 212 W. MADISON ST. CHICAGO. ILL. 




B B & B Special 

Wardrobe Trunk 

I Ply Fibre Covered 
Chicago: Marshall Field ft Co. $45.00 

Send (or Catalogue 
B B at B TRUNK CO, Pittabarg. Pa. 



PLAYS 



VAUDEVILLE 
N. Y. FLAY. BUREAU 
mont Theatre, N. Y. City. 
Stamp for catalog. 



ACTS, ETC 

IUREAU, Tre 



NEW DROPS, $10.00 

Painted to Order. Any sue up to 13x20 feet. 
in either Diamond Dye, Oil or Water Colors. 

g!.O0 deposit with each order. Sch.Il'* Scenic 
tudlo. Columbus. O. 



CIRCUS and JUGGLING 

Apparatua, Rolling Globes, Club*, Bstons. 
Guns, Wire Walkers' Apparatus and Novelties. 
Stamp for catalog. EDW. VAN WYCK, 
Cincinnati, O 

NOW READY 

THE | CLIPPER 
RED BOOK 

AND DATE BOOK 

For Season 1916-1917 
It contains the names and addresses of Man- 
ager*, Vaudeville and Dramatic Agents in New 
York, Chicago, Boston, Philadelphia, Pitts- 
burgh, San Francisco. Canada: Music Pub- 
lisher*! Theatrical Club* sad Societies; Mov- 
ing Picture Firms, end other information. 
Sent only on receipt of 2c stamp, aco 



receipt of 2c stamp. 

HSM £r.JL.SS u Poo cnt * rom T»E NEW 
YORK CLIPPER. 



COT OUT AND 
Send this Coupon and 2c stamp (or • 
copy of 

THE CLIPPER RED BOOK 

AND DATE BOOK 

(For Ulf-UIT) 

To THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 

1IM Broadway. New York 



Telephone 1T4S Bryant 

•J. SCHIERING 

EXPERIMENTAL WORK 



New Victoria Hotel 

IN NEW YORK lonq^acr^square 
145 to 155 West 47th Street 

Ths Very Heart of Nov Vera* 

ABSOLUTELY FIREPROOF 

3S0 ROOMS 250 PRIVATE BATHS 

Every Mode rn Coavaaleaes Baregsan Plan Exclosively 

ABE MIERS, Manager of Cafe Drop in at any time 

Stngla rooms, hot and cold water O 

Single rooms, private bath ti.se nasi ■■ 

Suite, parlor, bedroom and bath 84 and so* 

Suits, parlor. 2 bedraezae and hath tS sad up 



The Best 50c. Dinner in New York 



C. A. HOLLINGSWORTH 



Now York City 





Others Succeed. Why Can't Test 

STAGE TRAINING 

Dr.... e*a**>. Vassatill.. Stag* Daas- 
III •■« Fast* Pity Taaett. Technical 
and Practical Course*. Celebrtus* vbo 

studied under Mr. Alrlrnr: Annette Kel- 
lensann, Nora Bare*. Haiel Dawn. 
Joseph Santley. Barry Ulcer. Mils. 
Daxle. Mary Pnller. Dolly sisters. Taylor 
Holmes. Vielsn Prescott, Eleanor Painter 
and others. Writ* for eaulogwe men- 
tioning study desired. 

Alrieae Tee.tre School *4 Artist 

S7th St, at Broadway 

Entrance 225 w. 57th 8L. New Tort. 



SECOND-HAND 

GOWN S 



ANDREWS, 506 S. State Si., CHICAGO 



TIGHTS 

Silk Opera Hose and Stockings 

ABB OUR 81'BCIAL.TIBS 

nilJIIITV *»• BEST sad 

JiUrtLll I PRICES tha 1TOWEST 

Gold and BUver Broead**, gala*, Sottas. 
Thsatrioal Jewelry, IpangUt, Xto> 

Oold and BUru Trusunlass. 

Wigs, Boards and all Ooeda Th*atjioel. 

Catalogue* and Samples upon i aaaest . 

When aaklng tor C.t.logu.. pi.*** mantlon 
what goods are wanted. 

SIEGMAN & WEIL 

8. W. Oar. ITth 8t. and lfadlsen Ave. 
TUB) THEATRICAL 8DTPLT EalFOBIlTal 



THREE SHEETS 

TYPE ONLY 

CONSISTING OF THREE 28x42 SHEETS FLAT. 
Small Anoint Display Hitter. 

Black on Bed or Blue Two 

Quantity. Yellow. on White. Colon. 

100 $10.50 J10M $14.00 

200 17.00 17.00 22.00 

300 23.00 23.00 29.00 

400 26.00 26.00 35.00 

500 35.00 35.00 40.00 

Owing to market conditions all prices subject to change 
without notice. Bend for price list or all lands theatrical 

typo work. Commercial work same prices. Terms: Cash with 
order. Send 10c for route book. 

GAZETTE SHOW PRINTING COMPANY 

HAIIOOrl, ILLINOIS, u. s. a. 
Telephones— 8203-6841 Bryant. 

Liberty Construction Co. 

F. O'BODBKB AND P. LHNNON. 

New and Second Band SCENERY, PUOPBUllaTj, 

AND LUMBER, 8TAOB ELECTRIC 

APPLIANCES. 

Liberty TWtrm. SSI Want 47th St, New York 

Everything seed by "Birth of a Nation" and 

furnlahad by as. 



Enlarged and Beautified 

MOUQUIN'S 

6th Av... boL 27tts and 28th Sts-, N. T. 

MOST POPULAR FRENCH RESTAURANT 
PARISIAN CAFE. MUSIC SJS P. M. t> 1 A. St 



C L I F» F* E R 

BUSINESS INDEX 

Advertisements not exceeding one line la 
length will be published, properly classified, la 
this index, at the rate of }I0 for one year (SI 
issues). A copy of The New York Clipper 
will be sent free to each advertiser while the 
advertisement is running. 

CHEWING CUM— BALL— CANDY COATED 
Toledo Chewing Gum Co., Factories Bldg., 
Toledo, O. 

LAWYERS. 
F. L. Boyd. Attorney, 17 N. La Sella St.. 

Chicago. 
E. J. Ader, 10 South La Salle St., Chicago, DJ. 

MUSIC COMPOSED. ARRANGED. 
Cbaa. L. Lewis, 429 Richmond St., Cincinnati, 

Ohio. 

SCENERY AND SCENIC PAINTERS. 
Howard Tuttle, 141 Burleigh St., Milwaukee, 
Wit. 

SCHELL'S SCENIC STUDIO 

581 583-585 South High St., Columbus. O. 
SCENERY FOR HIRE AND SALE. 
Amelia Grain, 819 Spring Garden St., Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 

SONG BOOKS. 

Wra. W. Delaney, 117 Park Row, New York. 

STAGE LIGHT EFFECTS. LAMPS 

(Bought, Sold) 

Newton Art Work*. 305 W. 15th St, New York. 

TENTS. 
J. C. Co** Co.. 10 Atwater St.. Detroit. Mich. 

THEATRICAL GOODS. 
Boston Regalia Co., 387 Washington St, Bos- 
ton, Mass. 

THEATRICAL HARDWARE. 
Cravee Hardware Co.. 47 Eliot St . Boston. 

THEATRICAL PROPERTIES. 

E. Walker, 309 W. 39th St., New York. 

TRANSFERS 

Walton, 455 W. Ud St., N. Y.' 1179 Greeley. 

VENTRILOQUIST FIGURES. 
Ben Hobson. 910 Prospect Ave.. N. Y. C 

JOHN A. WALSH 

Writer of the Cleverest in Vaudeville, Songs, 
Sketches, Monologs. Patter. Wills Point. Tuaa. 

1'none 1828 Ureelej 

REIBER'S 

Long mid »,hort iIIm! aui-«- 111 or 1 OK. Day tod [light 
Auto Theatrical Tranafar Co.. 271 W.et 18th M. 
nerw.ee. If we taki> urtler we get you there. 



Tflrpbooe 3732 Greeley 



E. B. UeNALLT. Pirn 



Telephone 1360 Gram ere v 



WIGS 



TOUPEES, GREASE 
PAINTS, ETC 

A. M. BUCH A CO. 
11* N. Ninth St., Pk! 



NEARLY NEW 

Evening Gowns and Wraps 

Foil Dress, Tuxedo **d Prince Albert S nit i 

LUCY GOODMAN, 2315 S. Stat* St, CMcaaro 

MUSIC ARRANGED 

PIANO, ORCHESTRA. Melodies written to 
aong poems. W. H. NELSON, Aster Theatre 
Bldg., 1S31 Broadway, N. Y. 



CHICAGO 
MANUSCRIPT CO. 



MANUSCRIPT PLAYS" 

MUSICAL .COHCDICS 
■ABLOIOS. ETC 



431 MO. CLARK ST. OMICAOO.liTu 



IMPORTANT.— EVERETT J. EVA7.S. Com- 
poser- Arranger, make* a specialty of writing 

music for new tothors, tnd asiiitt publication. 
Send your poem* or complete song*. E.tab- 
1900. Suite 505. Astor Tbestre Bldg., 45th and 
Broadway, N. Y. 



WIGS 



Human Hair. Irtsa, DvSca, *w», TS*. 

es. Soabratte or aafi Draw Wis. 
81.00. tl.SO: ttane. Us.. *Oa.. 

75c. : Tlshts. 85*. iBstaat III I 
Catalog rre*. Faner Hat*. S 
Novelties. Ftossl sOJFTaaT *»«.. 
4< CHOW So., H. 1. 



rgn^rrw 



c ^ x _ : ^x-:kk~:k~:kk<~:k-mkkk^-mk-:k~:~><k~:~^^^^ 



ARTHUR KLEIN PRESENTS 








ETHEL 



EARLE 



ARNOLD 



a 



n 



d 



TAYLOR 



OFFERING 



U 



Put Out 



By BLANCHE MERRILL 



99 



Week of May 7th at B. F. Keith Y Alhambra Theatre 



£ 



£->**»>C»><"><^~:~M->*<"M**-M»>^X 





IIIIIIIHI Mill 



illlHIIHI 



-nri r*> <v<> t*^ ip uu u> ti> tn en cm in n> fY> <u cit> <l) 



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THE OLDEST THEATRICAL PUBLICATION IN AMERICA 



H **i m m *v* m *ij en m m m m m mrmrarrHE ai: 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



May 9, 1917 




HARRY WEBER 

presents 

GDI GREEK 

Character Delineator 
of Popular Ditties 



WITH 



WALTER FORD 

Pianist-Musical Director 

WEEK OF MAY 14, AT B. F. KEITH'S 
ALHAMBRA THEATRE 



Copyright, 1917, by the Clipper Corporation. 



Founded by 

FRANK QUEEN. 18S3. 



NEW YORK, MAY 9, 1917 



VOLUME LXV— No. 14 
Price, Ten Cenu 



"I'M THROUGH 

WITH THE 

RATS" 

— MOUMTFORD 

WILL ENTER BUSINESS. HE SAYS 

' ."I am through with the White Hats, 
for there is no longer any' such organiza- 
tion. I tried to do everything possible 
to make tbem an important . factor in the 
vaudeville field, bnt did not hare the sup- 
port that was promised or necessary to 
cause them to be recognized." 

This was the statement of Harry 
Mountford, former international executive 
of the White Rats Actors Union to a 
Clipper representative yesterday. After 
his work in winding up the affairs of the 
White Rats, and in disposing of their 
financial obligations through the sale of the 
club house and the ground lease of the 
premises, Mountford has been in seclUBion 
at the country home of Junie McCree, in 
Bayslde, L. I., where he intends to stay 
for a rest of at least two weeks. 

Mountford seemed to be reticent about 
talking in reference to the affairs of the 
White Rats. He .seemed to feel that as 
long as they were dead they should be 
allowed to have a quiet burial. During the 
conversation with a Clipper representative 
he said: 

"I have done more for the White Rats 
than they have done for me. Their cause 
was practically hopeless when those whom 
I had depended upon for support did not 
respond to my call for assistance. So, 
when I saw that there was no way of 
running the club house any more, and 
overtures were made to me for the taking 
over of the property, I entered into the 
deal, determined to get and save everything 
possible for the organization, its members 
and creditors. 

"The result you can see, for all of the 
holders of White Rats realty bonds are 
rare ' of getting every cent they invested, 
with interest ; the creditors who had sold 
goods to the organization received a settle- 
men of .fifty cents on -the dollar ; the em- 
ployes were all paid, and the acton, who 
had loaned money to the White Rats 
Actors* Union were also paid in full. 
Among" some of the actors who received 
this money that was loaned to the organ- 
ization were Fred Niblo, Frank Herbert, 
Frank North, Lydia Barry. T. P.. Russell, 
Montgomery & Stone, "Rill" Matthews 
and W.J. Cooke, former secretary of the 
White Rats, who was paid over $4,000 that 
was owing to him. 

- "And that is not all. The back taxes 
and rent on the premises were also paid, 
and the man who had the restaurant privi- 
lege obtained a bonus to get out With 
all of that, there is no obligation out- 
standing, except money due me for services 
and some lawyers who did work for the 
organization. It makes no difference whether 
I get what is due me, but I think that the 
lawyers win get their money. I win know 
better when the accountants go over the 
books and give . a certified . statement of 
their balance. If there should be any 
funds left the attorneys win get this. 

"I expect' that I will get the auditors' 
report about the middle of Tune, and at 
(Continued on page 4.) 



CHORUS GIRL TAKES POISON 

Hamilton, Can., May 5. — A chorus 
girl, giving her name variously as Elsie 
Gordon, Meldrum and Brown, who was 
with the High Life Girls Co., which dis- 
banded here last week, walked up to a 
traffic officer on the street last Wednesday, 
and telling him it was "all over" with her, 
dropped unconscious at his feet At the 
hospital she admitted having taken bichlor- 
ide of mercury. At last account she was 
living. A New York relative named 
Wilner was sent for, and arrived two days 
later. 



ACTRESS ASKS HEART BALM 

Alleging a breach of promise of mar- 
riage, Rose Ernest, a vaudeville performer, 
has brought suit for $10,000, through her 
attorney, Michael J. Holiey, against Er- 
nest Soper, also a vaudeville performer, 
in the Supreme Court. The plaintiff al- 
leges that after she bad accepted Sopor's 
proposal of marriage, she learned that he 
wns married to another woman. Harry 
Saks Hechheimer is attorney for the de- 
fendant 



FIELD MADE USELESS TRIP 

Columbus, Ohio, May 4.— AI. G. Field, 
manager; Edward Conrad, treasurer, and 
J. W. Pickens, agent of the Al. G. Field 
Greater Minstrels, journeyed from here to 
Trenton, N. J., April 24, to appear as wit- 
nesses in an action pending, entitled Field 
vs. Trent Theatre Co., only to learn that 
the case had been adjourned until June 0. 



PERFORMER BADLY HURT 

Columbus, Ohio, May 0. — The youngest 
of the three Travilla Brothers, who have a 
seal diving act on tbe Keith circuit, was 
seriously injured here last week. In sliding 
head first down a chute into a tank, the 
slide slipped and he struck his head on the 
iron edge of the tank. He was unable to 
go on to Cincinnati with bis brothers. 



"UNCLE ROBERT' AT HARTFORD 

Habtfohd, Conn., May 8. — James Lack- 
aye will star in a new play with music 
entitled "Uncle Robert," which Melville 
B. Raymond will present for the first time 
at Parsons' Theatre for a three days' run, 
starting Thursday. 



FOX TO SUCCEED DE HAVEN 

Harry Fox will succeed Carter De 
Haven in the principal role of "His Little 
Widows" next Monday night It is as- 
sumed that Flora Parker . (Mrs. Carter 
De Haven) will also leave the company at 
that time. 



DAVE HENDERSON LOSES WIFE 

Milwaukee, Wis., May 5. — Mrs. D. M. 
Henderson, wife of Dave Henderson, of 
Henderson and Scott, died Monday morn- 
ing. Burial took place in this city. She 
leaves a husband and son. 



WOOLFS MOTHER DIES 

The mother of Edgar Allan Wonlf, the 
playwright, died Sunday night, after 
long Buffering from mastoiditis. She was 
sixty years old. 



BOWMAN TO TAKE OUT REVUE 

POBXLARD, Maine, May 2. — Fred L. 
Bowman, who has just closed with the 
Jere" McAuliffe Co., as business manager, 
will 'take, ont a revue company of his own 
this Summer. ■•; 



NATIONAL VAUDEVILLE 

AR TISTS ON E YEAR OLD 

Organization That Began with Only a Few Members This 

Time Last Year, Is Now Greatest Club of Kind in the 

World, Numbering 6,450 Supporters 



The National Vaudeville Artists, Inc., 
celebrates its first birthday today and, 
from all evidences, seems to be a healthy 
youngster, aa its membership has in- 
creased from a mere handful to 6,450 
during the last twelve months. 

In February of last year Eddie Leon- 
ard, George McKay, Bob Albright and 
Henry Chesterfield met at a luncheon in 
one of the Broadway hotels. During the 
conversation, one of them suggested that 
it was an opportune time to start a 
vaudeville association, run along different 
lines than the White Rats. They called 
upon E. F. Albee and asked him if he 
would be in favor of an organization of 
artists and performers where the ques- 
tion of the ''closed" shop was left out. 

Mr. Albee informed tbem that he was 
and that he would lend them every as- 
sistance possible. This word spurred the 
men on, and in April they applied to the 
secretary of state for a charter under 
the name of the American Vaudeville Ar- 
tists. Later they were notified that they 
could not obtain a charter under this 
name, and a meeting was held at which 
it was decided to change the name of 
tbe organization to the National Vaude- 
ville Artists. A new application was 
then made and tbe charter was quickly 
granted. That was just a year ago to- 
day. The incorporators were Henry 
Chesterfield, Bert Fitzgibbons, Bob Al- 
bright, George McKay, Eddie Leonard, 
Harry Carroll and Oscar Lorraine. 

On May 25 a meeting of the organiza- 
tion was held in the Hotel Biltmore, at 
which ' only the incorporators were 'pres- 
ent. They elected temporary officers of 
the organization. Eddie Leonard was 
president; Oscar Lorraine, 1st vice-presi- 
dent; Hugh Herbert, 2nd vice-president; 
Bob Albright, 3rd vice-president; Harry 
Carroll, 4th vice-president: George Mc- 
Kay, treasurer, and Henry Chesterfield, 
secretary. 

After this meeting the members began 
to scurry around and, by June 14, when 
another meeting was held, 200 members 
had joined the organization. 

On July 25 thn first election of officers 
took puce, and Willard Mack was named 
president; Hugh Herbert, 1st vice-presi- 
dent; Bob Albright, 2nd vice-president; 
Oscar Lorraine, 3rd vice-president; George 
McKay, 4th vice-president; May Irwin, 
treasurer, and Henry Chesterfield, secre- 
tary. At this meeting, the membership 
bad increased to 300. It was decided 
at that time to waive the payment of 
$25 initiation fee during the recruiting 
campaign for new members. This order 
is and will be in effect until June 1, when 
it will again be restored. 

At that time the committee on club 
■rooms reported that they bad selected 
three . floors in .the American Theatre 
building. This report was accepted by 
the members. But, at a later meeting, 
the committee reported that the location 
was a bit off Broadway. and that it would 
be more advisable to get a puce on that 
thoroughfare. They later selected and 



leased the present site of the club at 
1587 Broadway. 

At this meeting the following board 
of directors was appointed: Chas. 
Ahcarn, Harry Carroll, Grace Demar, Gua. 
Edwards, Fred Hallen, Mrs. Gene Hughes, 
Geo. McKay, Ray Samuels, April Young, 
Bob. Albright, J. B. Carson, Emmet De- 
voy, Kate Elinore, Loney Haskell, Eddie 
Leonard, Willa Holt Wakefield, Ben 
Welsh, Lou Anger, Henry Chesterfield, 
Bert Fitzgibbons, Oscar Lorraine, Willard 
Mack and Jack Wyatt. 

The advisory board chosen was May 
Irwin, Eddie Foy, Lillian Russell, Joe 
Weber, Lew Fields, Lew Dockstader, 
Irene Franklin, James Mclntyre, Julia 
Nash, Bessie Clayton, Cecil Lean, Burton 
Green. The arbitration board appointed 
was composed of Henry Chesterfield, 
Hugh Herbert, Bob Albright, April Young 
and Marshall Montgomery. 

The membership board was composed 
of Willa H. Wakefield, Hugh Herbert. 
Eddie Leonard, Doc O'Neil and Henry 
Chesterfield. 

Tbe entertainment board appointed was 
Eddie Leonard, Stan Stanley, Geo. Moore, 
Ben Welsh and Una Clayton. 

The treasury board was composed of 
May Irwin, Jack Wyatt, Percy Weinrich, 
Will Oakland and Noel Travers. 

The finance board has as members, Lou 
Anger, Henry Bergman, Monroe Hopkins, 
Mabel Russell and J. K. Emmett. 

Tbe board of relief is composed of 
Clara Morton, Doc O'Neil, Jules Romer, 
Joe Cook and J. F. Dooley. 

On the pension board are Lou Hall, 
Dave Nowlin, Will Oakland and Grace 
Carlisle. 

The life insurance board has as mem- 
bers Oscar Lorraine, Frank Frablto, Ed. 
Lynn, W. A. Grew and Eleanor Fisher. 

On the legislation board are F. F. Bent, 
Frank Shean, Eddie Oarr, Hale Norcrosa 
and W. H. Wakefield. 

The following board for tbe protection 
of material was appointed, Loney Haskell, 
Ed. Morton, Bert Lamont and Win. Burns. 

After this meeting the membership be- 
gan to increase by leaps and bounds. At 
the beginning of September there were 
1,000 members in good standing. Oct 1, 
had 1,500 members in the organization. 
A month later there were 2,200 members, 
and Dec. 1, saw 3,000 members. The 
work kept on, and on Jan. 1, 1017, there 
were 3,760 members. 

On Jan. 20, tbe club rooms of the or- 
ganization were formally opened and 
more than 2,500 persons visited the 
premises during the day. 

The club occupies an entire floor at 1587 
Broadway, which is divided in such a 
manner as to .provide for a large loung- 
ing room, ladies' parlor, billiard and card 
room, restaurant and executive offices. 
The furnishings of the club were se- 
lected by E. F. Albee, and it is said to 
be the finest equipped club of its kind in 
New York. The furnishings are estimated 
to be worth $7,6001 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



May 9, 1917 



With the establishment of the dob 
rooms the membership started to increase 
very quickly, as on Feb. 1 there were 
4,500 members. The following month saw 
6,100 members on the rolls, and on April 
1 there were 6,100 members. On May 6 
there were 6.450 persons on the rotter of 
the club. 

Among some of the accomplishments of 
the organization for the performer are 
the equitable contract without a cancella- 
tion clause that can be obtained from any 
manager who is a member of the Vaude- 
ville Managers' Protective Association. 
They have established a protected mate, 
rial department, and numbers of cases 
have already been acted upon. The or- 
ganization will also come to the relief 
of any of its members in distress. 

Negotiations are on at present whereby 
the organization will insure every mem- 
ber without charge against sickness, acci- 
dents and death without the payment of 
any additional fee besides the regular 
dues. 

Henry Chesterfield is at present ar- 
ranging for a site for a summer club 
house close to New York, where members 
can sojourn and receive every accommo- 
dation afforded them in a hotel. It ia 
anticipated that this club house will be 
in operation by July 1. It ia expected 
that the place will be close to a golf 
course, as the N. V. A. golf team, com- 
posed of C. Leonard Fletcher, Jack Ken- 
nedy, Chas. Irwin, E. E. Clive, Wilbur 
Mack and several others will be engaged 
in contests during the summer with the 
Friars, Lambs and other theatrical golf 
clubs. 

It is expected by Mr. Chesterfield that, 
by the first of the year, branches of the 
organization will be established in Phila- 
delphia. Boston, Chicago, St. Louis, Kan- 
sas City, San Francisco, Seattle, Los An- 
geles and Toronto. 

From present indications it is believed 
that the headquarters of the organization 
will shortly be inadequate for the mem- 
bership and that a club house will have 
to be obtained by the first of the year. 

A benefit for the organization is to be 
held at the Hippodrome on June 3, when 
more than forty of the most celebrated 
theatrical artists in tbe country will ap- 
pear. 

During the balance of this week the 
club house will be decorated for the an- 
niversary occasion and special events ar- 
ranged for each night in the restaurant. 

COHAN WINS DAMAGE SUIT 

For infringing on the title of Max Mar- 
tin's "House of Glass," the Fifth Avenue 
Photo Play, Inc., must pay a judgment of 
$594.38 to George M. Cohan, the producer, 
who has won a judgment against them, 
through his attorneys, O'Brien, Malevinsky 
and 1 Driscoll. The testimony showed that 
the defendants, while running the episode 
of the Pathe' serial, "Who Pays 7" entitled, 
"Houses of Glass." displayed posters with 
a title exactly similar to Martin's play 
and advertised it as "a powerful drama in 
four acts: two years on Broadway." Al- 
though the defendants testified that the 
advertising displayed was sent them from 
the Pathe Exchange, the jnry awarded a 
verdict for the plaintiff. 



KURYLO GETS $265 JUDGMENT 

Enrico de Kurylo has been granted a 
judgment of $265 against the Lubowska 
Company, Inc., for services rendered the 
company in preparation for a contemplated 
tour to South America. Lubowska herself 
is no longer connected with the company. 



GIVE WILLIAM CRANE DINNER 
William H. Crane was tendered a birth- 
day surprise party by his co-performers 
in "The Happy Stranger" on a Southern 
Pacific train en route from Los Angeles 
to Bisbee. Arizona, last week. 



ALICE FLEMING WRITES FARCE 

Alice Fleming, the actress, bas just 
completed the manuscript of a new farce, 
entitled "Two Thoughts." in which she con- 
templates starring next season. 



ACTORS' FUND 

FAIR OPENS 
*? SATURDAY 

TO OUTSTRIP ALL OTHERS 



FIELDS IN FOLLIES AGAIN 

W. C. Fields has been engaged for the 
1017 edition of the Follies, which makes 
his third season with the show. 



The Actors' Fond Fair will be formally 
opened at 9 o'clock next Satu rday evennig 
when President Woodrow Wilson will press 
a button in the executive mansion in 
Washington, which will release a black 
velvet curtain that conceals the flags of the 
allies. As the curtain drops, the flags will 
be disclosed with flood lights turned upon 
them and the band will play "The Star- 
Spangled Banner," which will be sung by 
a prominent Grand Opera star. 

The doors of Grand Central Palace will 
be opened at seven that evening, and, while 
tbe throngs are awaiting the dedication 
signal, a band concert will be rendered by 
a military band. Men detailed from tbe 
National Guard Signal Corps will be in 
charge of tbe telegraph keys that will con- 
vey the President's click opening the fair. 
Mayor John Purroy Mitchel will make the 
dedicatory address on the opening night. 
During the rest of the fair, which will last 
until May 21, no other addresses are to be 
made. 

A special meeting of tbe Women's Com- 
mittee of tbe Fund was held In the Gaiety 
Theatre on Monday afternoon, at which 
complete plans of tbe fair were announced 
and the various persons were assigned to 
their specific work. Waldemar de Bille, 
executive director of tbe Fair, explained 
the general policy under which it is to be 
conducted, and requested tbe workers to 
adhere to his requests in every respect. 

More than five hundred stage women 
from tbe various shows in town will con- 
duct a campaign to-morrow to sell 250,- 
000 tickets for the fair at half the ad- 
mission price. The workers will invade 
Wall Street and the Broadway district, 
as well as being established in booths at . 
the Sunday Tabernacle and the Polo 
Grounds. 

Only two special days have been set 
aside up to the present time. One of them. 
Wednesday, May 16, is to be in honor of 
the Elks and Columbia University, and 
the other, "Masonic Day," will be Fri- 
day, May 18. Committees from the Elks. 
Columbia University and the Masons will 
be in charge of the program on these days. 

Practically all of tbe prominent actors, 
actresses and managers have been very 
liberal in their donations. Gifts have also 
been received from many department stores, 
outfitting houses, manufacturing concerns 
and general business people in all parts of 
the country. ' 

The dance floor during the fair will be 
conducted by the "Sixty Club." The com- 
mittee of hostesses on behalf of the club 
will be Laurette Taylor. Grace George, 
Elsie Janis. Edna May, Alice Brady, 
Mary Pickford, Nora Bayes. Anita 
Stewart. Mae Murray and Pauline Fred- 
ericks. 

The Friars and Lambs Club will give a 
cabaret entertainment daily with members 
of their organisations appearing in favor- 
ite stage roles. 

There will be about ISO booths on the 
two floors of the Palace at which displays 
ran be found. - 

Some of the most prominent booths, 
with the names of their chairmen, are: 
Actors' Church Alliance, Mrs. Charles A. 
Stevenson (Kate Claxton) : Actors' Fund. 
Lizzie B. Masters: Actors' Order of 
Friendship. Charles A. Wells: American 
Booth, Mrs. Charles Russell Bassett: 
Authors' League, Helen Woodruff; Bag 
Booth. Zelda Sears: Bird Cage* Mrs. 
Chauncey Olcott; Catholic Actors' Guild. 
.Tere Cohan ; French Actors. Beverly Sit- 
creaves : Flower Booth. Mrs. James 
Speyer: "Lest We Forget" booth. Thomas. 
A. Wise: Make-up booth, Henry Clay 
Miner: Vacation Fund Association. Laura 
Post: Moving Picture Studio, Charles 
Mover; National booth, Mrs. Don C. 
Selts: New York Theatre Clu b. Mrs. D. 
M. Tracy: Lambs' Club, William Conrt- 
leigh; Players' Club, Guy Nichols. 



CLOSE SPRINGFIELD CABARETS 

Speisofield, III, May 3. — Springfield 
cabarets, famed for their "risque" presenta- 
tions, are no more. With the closing of 
200 saloons at midnight last week all the 
cabarets went out of existence. Most of 
the cafe proprietors have advertised their 
fixtures for sale, though the "wet" contest 
ia still pending in the county court. The 
saloon interests lost out on all court actions 
already decided and anticipate complete 
annihilation. It is likely that ordinances 
wfll now make the state capitol "bone" 
dry. 



BOHEMIAN COLLECTION BURNED 

Uafu Villa, N. J., May 4. — The cele- 
brated Bohemian Society Collection, which 
was taken over by Dr. Arthur Gordon 
Lewis, when the Bohemian Club was dis- 
continued, was completely lost in the fire 
which recently destroyed the Summer borne 
of Dr. Lewis at this place. The collection, 
which was stored in the house, included 
hundreds of portraits of old-time theatrical 
stars and play bills, many of which can not 
be duplicated. 



SHOCKLEY GIVES UP THEATRE 

Decatur, HL, May 5. — The management 
which opened the new Lincoln Square 
Theatre, with Harry K. Shockley and 
Charlie Weidner in charge, will sever its 
connection with the house at the close of 
the legitimate theatrical season tonight. 
Shockley, who holds tbe lease, will either 
relinquish it or dispose of it before next 
season, and plans to resume his Cincinnati 
activities. 



UNION LEADER STRICKEN 

Cincinnati, O., May 5. — Andy Bolan, 
property man at the Empress theatre, has 
just recovered from a severe illness. But 
if s just Andy's luck that he recovered two 
days before the Empress season closed. 
William J. Keen an, Empress grip, and a 
leader in theatrical unions, was stricken 
at the theatre last week and had to be 
taken to a hospital 



HANKS GETS OHIO HOUSE 

Ciwciwhati, O., May 6. — A three 
weeks' run of popular-priced shows was 
opened today at the Empress Theatre, 
which closed its season of S. & C. vaude- 
ville. The theatre is leased by Thomas F. 
Hanks and Harry Mitchell of Chicago. 
"The- Katzenjammer Kids," a musical 
travesty is tbe first attraction. 



CANADIAN MANAGERS CHANGE 

Saskatoon, Canada, May 4. — J. "Gus" 
Hunter has succeeded Al. Cole as manager 
of the Strand Theatre here. Tbe Strand 
is the home of Smith's Musical Girls, musi- 
cal comedy tabloid stock show. Mr. Cole 
has been moved to the executive staff of 
the Regina Theatre, at Regina, Sask. 



COMPANY HONORS MITZI HAJOS 
Terse Haute, Ind., May 2. — Mitzi 
Hajos, playing with Sarage's "Pom-Pom" 
Co. here last week, was presented on Fri- 
day night with a silver set in commemora- 
tion of her birthday anniversary. The 
gift came from members of the company, 
beaded by Tom McNaughton, who made 
the presentation speech. 



HORTICULTURAL HALL SOLD 

Philadelphia, May 5. — Horticultural 
Hall, on Broad street below Locust and 
adjoining the Academy of Music, was 
bought last week by a firm of attorneys for 
$525,000. It is rumored that Klaw & 
Erlanger and Samuel F. Nixon are in- 
terested in the purchase. 



FRED STONE TO STAR ALONE 
Fred Stone, it is announced, wtft not 
seek any one as a successor to Dave Mont- 
gomery, but will star alone in a new play 
next season under the direction of Charles 
Dillingham. In the meantime, he will 
pass the summer on the ranch of a friend 
in Arizona. 



STRAND DROPS 

PARAMOUNT 

PROGRAM 

WILL USE GOLDWYN AND OTHERS 



The Strand Theatre has abandoned its 
regular Paramount program and, in the 
future, will present only Goldwyn and 
special Paramount and Artcraft releases. 
On Monday, a contract was signed with 
the Goldwyn concern for the exhibition of 
all its releases in this house, as the first 
run in New York territory. 

There have been rumors from time to 
time that the Strand management would 
relinquish its Paramount contract and 
book features in the open market But, it 
appeared afterward, that the Paramount 
people seemed to have a strong hold on 
the Strand management and kept them 
using its program. 

Since the formation of the Artcraft 
Film concern, however, the higher standard 
of features de luxe produced by tbe 
Famous-Players' Lasky, Mary Pickford, 
Douglas Fairbanks and other companies 
have been released by that concern, in- 
stead of by the Paramount exchanges. 
Naturally, the Strand people were com- 
pelled to take the Paramount pictures 
weekly and, in addition, if they wanted 
any of the Artcraft pictures, had to pay 
extra for them in addition to the rental 
on the other pictures. .The rental on the 
Paramount pictures is said to be $1,000 a 
week, while that on the Artcraft runs up 
to $2,500 a week. 



WALTER KENNEDY ILL 

Walter Kennedy, of the Harry Shea 
office, is ill and temporarily confined to 
his borne. 



"THE BRAT" TO MOVE 

Maud Fulton in "Tbe Brat," will move 
from the Harris Theare to tbe Morosco 
Theatre next Monday, replacing "Canary 
Cottage." 

MOUNTFORD SAYS HE'S 
THROUGH 

(Continued from page 3.) 

that time a meeting of the White Bats 
will be called for the last time, when the 
report will be submitted to them and the 
organization dissolved. 

"I can assure you," continued Mount- 
ford, "that it waa no easy matter to get 
the settlement that I did for the White 
Rata. I fought all of one night and the 
greater part of the next day until I re- 
ceived terms that would be suitable to me 
and to the benefit of the organization. 

"There bas been a great deal of talk as 
to how much money I was supposed to 
have squandered during the strike. My 
story will come out, and when it does, it 
will amaze people to see how little money 
I had to fight the battle of the actors. 

"From now on I have no further interest 
in the White Bats and, as far as the 
Goldie Pemberton action to have the books 
of the organization brought into court is 
concerned I can see only oae motive, and 
that is to give those opposed to tbe organ- 
ization an opportunity to ascertain who 
were members of the organization and who 
paid the levy. 

"This Pemberton woman waa known to 
me, and at one of the meetings I was 
compelled to ask her to leave the room 
before the business began, as some of the 
members threatened to expose her, and as 
she was a woman, I did not want any 
harm to befall her. I am not at all in- 
terested in the outcome of the suit. But 
I win say this: They win not find that 
any of the funds of the organization were 
dissipated or that we violated our charter 
by engaging in another business. We had 
every right to get out our own paper, as 
other labor organizations are doing, for we 
had no theatrical trade paper to carry our 
news for us. So, I am quite sure that we 
complied with the provisions of our 
charter." 

When .asked what his future intentions 
were, Mountford hesitated and then said, 
"First I wfll take a rest; and then I 
will probably consider one of many offers 
— •*» to me in 'another line of business." 



May 9, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



SELZN1CK FIGHTS 

PENNA. CENSORS 

OVER FILM 



EASIEST WAY" THE CAUSE 



Philadelphia, May 6. — The Lewis J. 
Selznick Productions, Inc., started a vig- 
orous legal fight against the Pennsylvania 
censors to-day in an attempt to remove 
the ban on "The Easiest Way," which 
features Clara Kimball Young. Attorney 
J. Lewis Brietinger, detailed before the 
judges of the Common Pleas Court, alleged 
ruinous hardships imposed by the censors. 

He said that many changes had been 
made in the film at the order of the censors, 
and that the latter then decreed that the 
title be changed and the whole sixth reel 
be eliminated. The attorney asserted this 
would completely devitalize the story and 
ruin the film. 

The company contends that the picture 
is not improper, and does not tend to debase 
or corrupt morals. 

This contention is supported by leading 
film exhibitors who have rallied to the 
support of Selznick. The court test_ is 
looked upon as a long desired rebellion 
against the arbitrary methods of the Penn- 
sylvania board, which is declared to have 
acted in a high-banded manner against 
many films. 

HOWARD & CLARK MAY SPLIT 

Rumors are current along Broadway that 
the team of Howard & Clark are about to 
split. It is said that Miss Clark is dis- 
satisfied with the little she has to do in the 
present revue and that she has been dicker- 
ing with Harry Clark for the purpose of 
forming a vaudeville ■partnership. It is 
also stated that Howard is anxious to star 
alone in the act and would like the revue to 
go under the name of Joseph B. Howard 
& Co. In the event of the team severing 
partnership, Miss Poe, who now recites the 
prologue in the revue, is likely to appear 
in Miss Clark's numbers. 



CHICAGO AGENTS HERE 

An influx of Chicago agents was notice- 
able along Broadway early this week, which 
meant that the Midwestern crowd were here 
early to gather their acts for next season. 
Usually they do not arrive until June. 
Those that were seen about the Palace 
Theatre were Coney Holmes* Andy Tal- 
bot, Charles Freeman, Boyle Wolfolk, Nat 
Phillips, Harry Spingold and James B. 
McGowen. They all stated they would re- 
main in the East about a week before re- 
turning home. 

ROOT TAKES OLEAN HOUSE 

Rochester, N. Y., May 6. — A. w." 
Root, former booking agent of Roch- 
ester, and owner of "Enigmarelle," the 
Mechanical Man which has been playing 
the United time, has taken over the Palace 
Theatre, at Olean, N. Y. The house has 
a seating capacity of 1,500, and will con- 
tinue a policy of vaudeville and Feature 
photo play. 

DANCER IN SANITARIUM 

Rochester, Minn., May 2. — Etta L. 
Berger of the Dancing Bergers, was taken 
suddenly ill while playing Oxford Junction, 
Iowa, last week with the Francis Ingram 
show. She was rushed to tbe Mayo 
Brothers in this city, and is now in the 
Stanley Sanatarinm here. 

OPELS BEGINS TOUR 

Toledo, Ohio, May 2. — The Opels 
opened at the Gaiety Theatre, here, on 
Sunday. They put on a two-hour show, 
consisting of magic, juggling and comedy 
sketches. This marks tbe eleventh tour of 
this show, which, this season, will work 
East 



GRACE WILSON OPERATED UPON 

Grace Wilson, a show girl rehearsing with 
the Follies, underwent an operation for 
appendicitis last Saturday at the Prospect 
Heights Hospital, Brooklyn. Her condi- 
tion is reported favorably, but it will be 
several weeks before she can leave the 
hospital. 

THEATRES FORM ALLIANCE 

Rochester, N. Y., M»y 6. — A triple 
alliance has been formed between the 
Strand, Colonial and Family Theatres. 
-Vaudeville .will be shifted to the Strand 
instead of the Family next season, as larger 
seating capacity can be arranged. 



DEMANDS PROBE 
OF WHITE 
RATS_B00KS 

WANTS TO TRACE FUNDS 



ROCHESTER TEMPLE TO CLOSE 
Rochester, N. Y., May <5. — The regular 
vaudeville season at the Temple closes 
Saturday. The U. B. O. house had a fine 
season and will open early in Sept. "Joan 
the Woman," featuring Geraldine Farrar, 
will be the attraction next week. 



LOUISE DRESSER HAS NEW SKIT 

Chicago, May 3. — Louise Dresser ap- 
peared this week at the Palace in a playlet 
called "For Country," by A. F. Hopkins 
and Philander Johnson. It is conceded 
that the main idea of the skit is good, but 
that it has been poorly worked out. 



GEORGE LEVEY WELL AGAIN 

George Levey, the well known the- 
arical host of 44th Street, lias recovered 
from a serious operation. 



ROCHESTER MOVIE CLOSES 

Rochester, May C. — The Knickerbocker 
Theatre, one of the oldest movies in town, 
closed May 1. 



HITCHCOCK ENGAGES BORDONI 

When Raymond Hitchock's new revue 
"Hitchy Koo" opens shortly, Irene Bor- 
doni, whose vaudeville appearances were 
brought to a sudden halt by the death of 
Melville Ellis, will be found in a featured 
spot in the cast. 



FIELDS PREPARING NEW SHOW 

AL G. Field is organizing his Greater 
Minstrel Show for next season. When he 
will start his thirty-second tour with a 
show which he plans to make the banner 
one of his long career. 



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JANET DUNBAR FOR "WANDERER" 
Janet Dunbar has been engaged for 
the cast of "The Wanderer" for next 
season. 



JANE OAKER 

Miss Jane Oaker, who has been such a terrific 
hit with "Cousin Lucy" as "Queeney" for past 
two seasons, is now rehearsing* her sketch by 
Julian Eltinge and opens next week in vaude- 
ville. "Her Grace de Vamp" is its title, and 
it has four people and special scenes. 



An order to show cause why the White 
Rats Actors' Union should not produce its ■ 
books and accounts for examination by a 
Supreme Court Justice or referee that 
maj be appointed, was issued by Justice 
Mitchel Erlanger, last week, on the ap- 
plication of Goldie Pemberton, a member 
of the organization. The order is re- 
turnable May 17 and was as follow-*: 

"The petitioner prays for a visitation 
and inspection of said White Rats Actors' 
Union, with its books and vouchers, by a 
justice of the Supreme Court, or any per- 
son appointed by the court for that pur- 
pose and for other relief therein specified, 
and, it further appearing by such peti- 
tion, to the satisfaction of this court, 
that said White Rats Actors' Union and 
its officers and directors have misappro- 
priated certain of its funds and property 
and diverted them from the purpose of 
its incorporation and that it has engaged 
in other business than that stated in its 
certificate of incorporation and that the 
persons hereafter named are directors 
thereof, and no previous application for 
an order having been made, it is on the 
motion of J. A A. S. Saplineky. attorneys 
for the petitioner, that this order is 
granted." 

Those who were named as defendant 
directors of the White Rats in the peti- 
tion are Fred Niblo, Frank North, Sam 
Morton, Ernest Carr, Junie McCree, 
Johnny Bell, G. E. Delmore, Frank Her- 
bert, J. F. Dolan, Otto Steinart, Barry 
Connors, Jim Marco, Tbeo. Babcock, R. H. 
Hodge, Edward Archer, W. P. Conley, 
James Greenfield, Victor P. 'Wormwood 
and Arthur Williams. The order of the 
court called for the service upon each of 
these defendants of a copy of the peti- 
tion, as to why they should not be re- 
quired to make and file an inventory and 
account of the property, effects and lia- 
bilities of the White Rats Actors' Union, 
with detailed statements of the transac- 
tions of the organization during the 
twelve months preceding the granting of 
the order. 

In her petition, Miss Pemberton states 
that she has been a member of the or- 
ganization since April 1, 1912, and that 
her dues are paid up until Oct. 1 of this 
year. 

In the petition it is declared upon in- 
formation and belief, according to a 
statement printed in the White Rats' of- 
ficial paper, on April 13 of this year, 
that the organization had 18,000 mem- 
bers who were to pay annual dues of 
$10 a year. 

The petition further continues that, al- 
lowing for delinquencies in payment, at 
least $100,000 should have been collected 
in dues during the last year- and, with 
the five per cent, levy assessment to as- 
sist in the fight against the vaudeville 
managers, which was in effect from Feb. 
9 to April 13 last, another $24,407.70 was 
paid into the organization. This amount, 
she alleges, is the minimum amount of 
money realized through the levy. 

Another source of revenue, she alleges, 
was money that was procured from ad- 
dressing labor meetings. She says that 
she addressed a meeting in Boston during 
the strike and a considerable amount of 
money was acquired. 

It is alleged upon information and be- 
lief that the White Rats Realty Corpora- 
tion was formed as a subsidiary of the 
White Rats Actors' Union, because it is 
doubtful whether tbe latter could hold 
chattels of realty" value. It is further 
stated that the Union controls $100,000 
stock in this corporation and that the 
directors of the Union controlled the elec- 
tion of the officers and directors of the 
realty corporation. 

It is alleged that they allowed a $125,- 
000 realty bond issue and a $5,000 chattel 
mortgage on the furniture of the dab 
house to go by default of payment when 



they should have had sufficient funds to 
meet the payment of the interest on the 
bonds snd the other obligation. 

She charges that the directors of the 
White Rats permitted the directors of 
the realty corporation to surrender pos- 
session and convey title to one R. E. J. 
Corcoran, representative of the Columbia 
Trust Co., holder of the largest part of 
the $125,000 bond issue, and thereby the 
White Rats Realty Co., was deprived of 
all interest or equity in the premises. 
She alleges that, with such a large in- 
come as the organization should have, 
they allowed the property to go by de- 
fault, which could have been avoided by 
the payment of the interest on the bonds. 

It is alleged that, at several meetings, 
Mountford stated that the running ex- 
penses of the club house did not exceed 
$750 a week and that there were uo 
other obligations of the corporation. 

It ia then alleged that, during the paat 
year, funds of the corporation in excess 
of $50,000 have been dissipated and mis- 
appropriated, for which no account has . 
been rendered to the corporation. 

The petition further states that, for a 
long time, only meagre and indefinite in- 
formation as to the income and expendi- 
tures of the corporation were given by 
the officers and directors, to the members. 
During tbe last three months, it is al- 
leged, no information at all was given. 
Five months ago, it states, Mountford 
gave a statement at one of the meetings 
of the gross receipts and disbursements 
for tbe preceding week. 

It is further alleged that large eums 
of money were spent for the employment 
of pickets during the recent strike and 
that their real duties were to create dig- 
order and disturbances in theatres, tbe 
managers of which had had difficulties 
with the organization. It is charged that 
these people attacked and assaulted ar- 
tists working in such theatres. Payment 
of $6 a week to a single picket and $10 a 
week to a team of pickets was the re- 
imbursement for such services. 

However, it is alleged that the sum of 
money expended for this work was not 
sufficient to dissipate the funds of the 
corporation, derived from dues and as- 
sessments. 



MABEL HAMILTON 

Mabel Hamilton, the petite brunette, 
whose likeness graces the cover of The 
Clippeb this week, is one of vaudeville's 
favorites whose dainty personality has won 
her many admirers. She was formerly a 
member of the team of Clark and Hamil- 
ton, but will shortly appear alone In a 
novelty offering under the direction of M. 
S.'Bentham. This charming artiste, with 
her fascinating ways and mellow voice, 
should prove a welcome acquisition to the 
two-a-day. Her new act was written by 
Blanche Merrill. 



BRADY EXECUTORS OUSTED 

Robert K. Gordon and Robert C. 
Crowley, named by the late "Diamond 
Jim" Brady as executors, have been ex- 
cluded by Surrogate Cohalan as temporary 
administrators of the estate of the de- 
cedent. The Surrogate acted in considera- 
tion of the objections raised by Daniel M. 
Brady and Mrs. Hattie Mathleu, respec- 
tively brother and sister of the late steel 
operator. 



HARTFORD BUSINESS HOLDS UP 

Habtpobd, Conn., May 8. — No let np in 
attendance is felt in tbe playhouses of the 
Capitol City since President Wilson an- 
nounced oar entrance into the great world 
conflict. Papers editorially here are urging 
this branch of diversion for the people 
of the land. 



BURLESQUE CLUB OPENED 

The new dab rooms of the Theatrical 
Burlesque Club were opened for members 
yesterday at 721 Seventh Avenue. The 
formal house warming is announced for 
next Monday. 



ROSENBAUM MANAGES STOCK 
Cleveland, Ohio, May 6. — Edward E. 
Rosenbaum, Jr., has come here to take 
charge of F. Ray Comstock's stock com- 
pany at the Colonial Theatre. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



May 9, 1917 




LEGITIMATE STARS MAKE 

INVASI ON INTO VAUDEVILLE 

Promising Summer Season for Variety Houses Attracts Musical 

and Dramatic Lights, and Two-a-Day Bills Will 

Have Imposing Array of Stars 

A great influx of theatrical stars into 
the field of vaudeville is now taking place. 
An imposing array of beadliners of the 
drama and musical comedy have either be- 
gun or are rehearsing for vaudeville en- 
gagements, and the coming months give 
promise of having legitimate headlinera on 
practically every big time vaudeville bill. 

Such a noticeable influx of stars into 
vaudeviUedom is probably dne to the ap- 
proach of the summer season which, al- 
though always dead as far as musical and 
dramatic productions are concerned, 
promises to be a particularly lively sum- 
mer in and around New York, from a 
vaudeville standpoint, it being the inten- 
tion of most of the variety houses to re- 



main open. 
Perhaps the most prominent legitimate 



star to enter the realm of the two-a-day 
is Julia Arthur, who has closed her sea- 
son in "Seremonda" and is preparing to 
invade vaudeville with a high class play- 
let. 

Seeing the trend toward legitimate stars 
in vaudeville, Al 'Woods has turned a part 
of his energies in that direction, and is 
starring GabricIIe Dorziat in a dramatic 
playlet entitled, "The Purple Vial." 

Adele Rowland, who suddenly left the 
cast of "Her Soldier Boy," is another re- 
cruit to the vaudeville ranks. 

Among other stars who have recently in- 
vaded vaudeville, or have decided to do so, 
are Robert Knight, Annie Hughes, Harry 
Mestayer, Dorothy Donnelly, Effie Shan- 
non, Julia Nash, Robert Toms, Julian 
Eltinge and Phyllis Neilson Terry. 



KEITH REVUE NEARLY SET 

Philadelphia, May 3. — This season's 
revue at the B. F. Keith Theatre here will 
be called "Made in Philly," die same title 
as was used last year. It will be sponsored 
by Harry Jordan, manager of the theatre, 
and H. Bart McHugh, the agent. Frank 
Orth has supplied the book, lyrics and 
music for the production and, up until 
now, the cast consists of representative 
local talent, although a glance through 
the list of names shows that more come- 
dians are needed. 

The production will open July 1 and run 
for six weeks. The company will consist 
of fifty principals and choristers, among 
whom are Frank Orth, Harry Fern, Her- 
bert LJoyd, Gaston Palmer, Charley 
Uffer, Harold Mclntyre, Percy Welling, 
Flo Bert and Anna Cody. Last year 
Johnny Dooley and Xvette Bugel were the 
principal fonmakers, bat they are now in 
the Winter Garden show, and it is possible 
that Ray and Gordon Dooley will be added 
to the cast to bolster up the comedy end. 



ACT NOT CANCELLED 

The report that Fancbon and Marco had 
been cancelled last week by Managing 
Director Sbakman of the Eighty-first 
Street Theatre was erroneous, the act hav- 
ing played there the last half. Mr. Sbak- 
man considers the turn a very good one 
for his clientele and was glad to play it. 



SOLDIERS AT HAMILTON 

In addition to the regular bill at the 
Hamilton Theatre for the first half of this 
week. Manager William It. Meyers had, as 
an added attraction, a detail of thirty men 
from the Thirty-second Coast Artillery, 
who drilled upon the stage. 

SWIFT ESTABLISHES RECORD 

Manager Harry Swift, of the Harlem 
Opera House, established a record last 
week in obtaining members for the National 
Vaudeville Artists by securing thirty-five 
applications. Twenty of these were pro- 
cured on Thursday. 



DOYLE & DIXON IN "CHIN-CHIN" 

Doyle and Dixon, appearing at the Palace 
Theatre, will be seen in "Chin-Chin" next 
season, playing the parts created by Mont- 
gomery and Stone. Fred Stone will head 
a company of his own in a new production 
to be put into rehearsal in July by C. B. 
Dillingham. The "Chin-Chin" company 
will most likely come under the man- 
agerial reins of A. H. Woods, who will 
route the show, starting in August. 



POUGHKEEPSrE HOUSE OPENS 

Potjohkeepsie, May 5. — The Colling- 
wood Opera House here opened its summer 
vaudeville season this week. The show is 
being furnished by Byrne & Kirby, who 
have taken over the operation of the White 
Rat road shows. They are playing the 
house on a percentage basis. The bill for 
the last half consisted of Alex Patty, 
Frank O'Brien, Marco Twins, College Trio, 
Walsh, Lynch & Co., Otto Bros, and Al- 
mont, Dumont, Ed. Coe. 



WULARD TO HEAD TROUPE 

Willard, The Man Who Grows, is ar- 
ranging to take a troupe of American per- 
formers for a tour of South America. 
Eight vaudeville acts are to constitute the 
bill which is to be headed by Lina Car- 
rerra, daughter of Anna Held. » 



HERZ-HERBERT ACT SPLITS 

The act of Leah M. Herz and Joseph 
Herbert, Jr., which showed at Proctor's 
Fifty-eighth Street Theatre last week for 
three days, has split. The partners have 
decided to disagree and broke their busi- 
ness relationship. Miss Herz is now seek- 
ing another partner, and Herbert states he 
is going with a production. 



ACROBATS OPEN FOR LOEW 

Lazier, Worth and company, acrobats, 
opened an engagement Monday on the 
Loew circuit. 



JOE LEVY BACK 

Joe Levy, of the Mark Levy offices, re- 
turned from a trip to Chicago and the 
Middle West last Saturday. Levy was 
gone three weeks looking over threatrical 
conditions. 



PROF. ZANCIG HAS NEW ACT 

Prof. Julius Zancig, for many years 
manager of "The Zancigs," will soon re- 
turn to the vaudeville stage with a mystery 
act entitled "The Miracle of the Crystal," 
which will run from twenty to twenty-five 
minutes on full stage. 



BRIGHTON EXECUTIVES PICKED 

When the New Brighton Theatre, 
Brighton Beach, opens on May 21, Geerge 
Robinson will be managing director; 
David Berk, supervisor; Benjamin Roberts, 
orchestra director, and Charles Dowling in 
charge of the box office. 



OPERATE ON CHARLES KING 

Charles King, of Brice and King, was 
operated upon at the Prospect Hospital, 
Brooklyn, last Thursday for an aggravated 
ease of hernia. His early recovery is an- 
ticipated. 

ANN ANDREWS TO ENTER VAUDE. 

Ann Andrews, who appeared in the lead- 
ing role of "Nju," the drama of Russian 
life by Ossip Dymow, is rehearsing in a 
new vaudeville sketch by the same author. 



RETURN TO PLAY LOEW TIME 

Holmes and Holliston, after a success- 
ful Western tour, returned East last week 
and opened on the Loew Circuit. 



HELEN CANTLON SIGNED 

Helen Cantlon has joined Bert Leslie's 
company in "Hogan in Mexico." 




U. S. LIKES GRANLUND SPEECH 
N. T. Granlund, publicity man of the 
Marcus Loew enterprises, who conducted a 
Navy recruiting campaign in conjunction 
with Kitty Gordon over the Loew Circuit 
of theatres, has been requested by Lieut. 
Commander Grady, in charge of the New 
York recruiting division, to supply him 
with a written copy of his speech, delivered 
during the campaign, for use as the official 
navy recruiting speech. Lieut, Wright, in 
charge of the Brooklyn District, has also 
adopted the Granlund speech as official. 
During the tour of the Loew houses by 
Miss Gordon and Granlund, two hundred 
and fifty-seven recruits were obtained in 
one week. 



DODY AND LEWIS TO UNITE 

After a separation of three years Sam 
Dody, who is doing a single in vaudeville, 
and Sam Lewis, of the vaudeville trio of 
Lewis, Belmont and Lewis, will be re- 
united for the purpose of presenting a 
black face act, entitled, "Black Education." 
Dody has just returned from a trip to 
Atlantic City. 



VIOLET MacMlLLAN IN FILMS 

Universal City, CaL, May 4. — Violet 
MacMillan, the Universal star, has* com- 
pleted her vaudeville tour, and has re- 
turned her to resume her screen work for 
a period of two months. She will take up 
her vaudeville work again in September, 
starting in the Middle West. 



EVELYN NESBiT SICK 
Joseph Howard and Ethelyn Clark in 
their new revue replaced Evelyn Nesbit 
and Jack Clifford on the bill at the Bush- 
wick Theatre this week. Nesbit & Clifford 
were compelled to cancel their engagement 
on account of the illness of Miss Nesbit. 



KEITH HOUSE DELAYED 

CinctrnatL, O., May 5. — The plans for 
rebuilding B. F. Keith's Theatre on Wal- 
nut street, to make it the center of a 
skyscraper office building, have been de- 
layed a year. Difficulty in getting build- 
ing material is the reason given. 



MOROSCO GETS TWO PLAYS 

Oliver Morosco last week accepted "T3»e 
Skeleton," by Frederick Truesdell, and 
"Just a Suggestion," by Harold Selman, 
both of which will have early tryouts at 
the Burbank Theatre, Los Angeles, Cal. 



MYERS AIDING SHEEHAN 

Sam Myers, formerly manager of the 
Audubon Theatre and later of the Lyric 
Theatre, is now connected with the film 
department of the William Fox interests 
as an aide to W. F. Sheehan. 



O'DONNELL IS PROMOTED 

Robert O'Donnell. treasurer of the Or- 
pbeum Theatre, Brooklyn, has been ap- 
pointed assistant manager at Keith's Phila- 
delphia theatre. He assumed his new 
duties last Monday. 



NEW ACT FOR MARION CLAIRE 

Marion Claire has been engaged by Tom 
Brown, of the Six Brown Bros., to appear 
as a single in a new act specially written 
for her to tour the Keith circuit. 



BILLY GLASON ON LOEW TIME 

Billy Glason has started on a tour of the 
Loew time,, and after having played the 
DeKalb and American Theatres is now 
playing eight weeks out of town. 



NEW SISTER TEAM FORMED 

Dahl & Marino are now breaking in a 
new sister act. The team was formerly 
known as Dahl and the Marino Sisters. 



FIRST THEATRE RECRUITING STATION IN THE U. S. 
The b. f. Keith interests, as soon as war was declared, threw open their houses to the Govern- 
ment. Al. Darling, manager of the house, is on the extreme left. 



FANCHONETTL REPLACES LEA 

Marie Fanchonetti has taken the place 
of Emilie Lea with "The World's Dancers." 



May 9, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 







RIVERSIDE 

Three Bobs, a clever club juggling act, 
opened what more than one enthusiastic 
person in Monday afternoon's large audi- 
ence pronounced the best bill this theatre 
has yet presented, and if this high standard 
of entertainment can' be maintained the 
latest Keith vaudeville house can easily 
remain open throughout the entire summer. 

The Three Bobs, while offering nothing 
really new in club juggling, work so fast 
and with such ease that their act is an 
excellent opener. A smart bull terrier does 
some clever stunts and enjoys his work 
keenly. 

The Three Du For Boys, neatly attired 
young men, dance exceptionally well and 
sing a number of popular songs. Their 
dancing easily ranks with any seen this 
season, but as for their singing ability the 
least said the better. The act moves along 
at a fast clip- until one of the members 
sings the song about riding in the rolling 
chair, which brings it to an almost dead 
stop. The song should be eliminated. 
Some good dancing at the end pulled the 
act up to a good finish. 

Frankln Ardell's comedy playlet, "The 
Wife Saver," found number three spot al- 
most ideal and pleased greatly. There is 
not a great deal to Mr. Ardell's little 
sketch, but he knows how to deliver his 
lines and he makes every point count. 

"Oklahoma" Bob Albright, in fine voice, 
rendered a number of popular selections 
and finished with a red hot preparedness 
speech. Albright's voice, rich and vibrant, 
is equally pleasing in a ballad or novelty 
number, and had he when a boy fallen 
into the hands of a competent vocal teacher 
would probably now be knocking at the 
doors of the Metropolitan opera house in- 
stead of being in vaudeville. His assistant, 
a talented girl pianist, rendered a couple . 
of selections exceptionally well. 

Andrew Tombes "Bride Shop," the dainty 
miniature musical comedy, with its clever 
dialogue, catchy music, and clean dialogue 
was a delight. Rarely has a piece that can 
compare with this been seen in vaudeville. 
The chorus is well drilled, sings well, is 
good to look upon, and the entire act moves 
along with all the ease and smoothness of 
a big Broadway production. There are 
some changes in the cast, Ellen Boyle re- 
placing Miss Wentworth, who was first 
seen in the piece. 

Sophie Tucker and her 5 Kings of Syn- 
copation, nearly stampeded the show, open- 
ing intermission. The Riverside audience 
could not get enough of Sophie, who gave 
her entire song repertoire, sang a half 
dozen request numbers and answered cur- 
tain calls galore. Miss Tucker is singing a 
number of new songs which pleased im- 
mensely, also some old ones, but all songs 
sound new as she sings them. Brimful of 
personality, and a fine sense of song values 
her act always is strong musically, but her 
present vehicle is the best she has been 
seen in for many seasons. 

Herbert Williams and Hilda Wolfus in 
"Hark, Hark" have an act filled with tom- 
foolery and nonsense, yet it possesses such 
iaugh provoking qualities that many in the 
audience were well nigh hysterical before 
its conclusion. It really is nothing but a 
piano act, but Williams can get more fun 
out of the instrument and a refractory 
stool than one would ever imagine. 

"The Dancing Girl of Delhi," a beauti- 
fully staged and finely executed dancing 
act closed the bill. Entirely in dance the 
story of "Indranie," a dancing girl of the 
wandering tribes is portrayed. The girl is 
discovered by two merchants who, planning 
to sell her, take her to court to dance be- 
fore the Nizam. Ammiena, the Nizam's fa- 
vorite, foresees her coming and attempts to 
slay.her, but she is foiled in the attempt. In- 
dranie dances before the Nizam, who, won 
by her grace and beauty, mates her tb* 
favorite of the court. 

Vanda Hoff as Indranie and Betalo 
Rubino as Ammiena were the principals. 

W. V. 



SHOW REVIEWS 

(Continued en pmg* a) 



COLONIAL 

A show considerably below the Colonial 
standard was opened by a classic posing 
act, billed as La Bergere. (New acts.) 

That act was followed by Felix Ber- 
nard and Eddie Janis, who served their 
"Musical Highball" to the audience. These 
two lads make a very neat appearance 
in their brown Eton suits, and proceeded 
to entertain with violin and piano. They 
fitted well into their spot and pleased. 
The Seven Bracks proved their right to 
a better spot than opening or dosing, in 
the third position, where they went over 
with a wallop. They went through their 
routine with machine-like pep, and dis- 
played good show sense in keeping the 
time of their act short. Unlike most acro- 
bats, this septette have cheerful smiles 
upon their faces throughout their routine, 
which does much toward winning the good 
will of the audience. Acrobats who take 
themselves seriously would learn a good 
point by watching the Bracks from the 
front 

Val and Ernie Stanton get a lot of fun 
out of their skit, "Oh, Brazil!" Their 
"nut" stuff seemed to please the audience. 
The thing that went over for the biggest 
applause in their act was the ukelele and 
harmonica number with which they close. 
Dan Burke and company must speed up 
"The Old Master" considerably, if they do 
not wish it to drag. As tbe turn stands, 
the action Is very slow, and the act is 
rather tiresome, except for Burke's dance 
and a couple of bits that the girls do 
toward the end of the sketch. In laying 
stress on the dancing, Burke and his com- 
pany seem to have neglected perfecting 
their lines, which would be none too en- 
tertaining at best, but are rendered in a 
rather sing-songy way. The old master and 
little Sally both commit this fault and 
should lose no time in remedying it. 

After intermission, Virginia Lewis and 
Jean White told the audience, in song, 
that they "were just two girls trying to 
set along." Their voices blend well and 
they rendered a number of songs in tip- 
top shape. It would seem better suited to 
the purposes of the act if the girls put 
their "Dixie" song ahead of their "good- 
bye" number, using the latter for their 
encore. Thus placed, the "good-bye" .num- 
ber would be even more appropriate. 

Sallie Fisher presented tbe gem of the 
bill in "The Choir Rehearsal." written by 
Clare Rummer. The lines and general 
make-up of the playlet show that it has 
been written by an experienced hand. It 
possesses splendid atmosphere, and all of 
the types are well portrayed. Sallie 
Fisher, as the girl who had to be prayed 
for, gave a performance that can be re- 
viewed with nothing but praise. In the 
role of Esmeralda Tucker, she looks as 
pretty as a picture, and acts with a real 
understanding of the part of the vivacious 
maid who yearns for something more excit- 
ing than provincial Tuckertown. 

John Hogan, who is her leading sup- 
port, gives an excellent performance. The 
quartette rendered the hymn, "Oh, Where 
Is My Wandering Boy To-night?" In a 
way that brought forth warm applause 
from a frigid audience. 

Leo Been made a hit with his air of 
nonchalance, and won a flattering hand 
with bis high-class pianologne. His song 
about tbe lad in long trousers is consider- 
ably different than anything else in bis 
routine, but was put over in a way that 
proves this artist's versatility. 

Bee Ho Gray and Ada Somerville, as- 
sisted by Onion, a horse, were in the clos- 
ing spot, and held in the biggest portion 
of the audience. Gray handles the ropes 
cleverly, while Miss Somerville puts Onion 
through a number of clever tricks. H. G. 



PALACE 

The show this week runs through nine 
acts that contain plenty of novelty and 
comedy. 

The news pictorial opened, and Ameta, 
with her famed mirror dances, followed. 
This colorful novelty has lost none of its 
beauty since last seen here, and Ameta was 
accorded a big hand on her sure-fire ef- 
fects. 

Charles Oleott offered bis well known 
pianologne. in which he gathers abundant 
laughs with his routine of burlesque comic 
opera. His opening introduction of the 
piano is clever, and his recitation at tbe 
finish let him off in fine style. In a difficult 
spot he did excellently. 

Ida Brooks Hunt and Alfred De Manby 
have a singing act which spells class. 
George Hal peri n is the accompanist and 
scores individually with a fine piano solo. 
De Manby possesses a baritone voice which 
is both mellow and powerful, and Miss 
Hunt readies very high with her top notes. 
The routine Is, at present, arranged for 
the showing of their respective voices, and 
also to speed along the act, which, at Its 
debut was a distinct success. 

Laurie and Branson followed in a cinch 
spot, in which they easily had things run- 
ning pretty nearly their own sweet way. 
After the class in the singing act ahead 
of them, these two young people put over 
several hick gags to good appreciation. 
The gag about "smell-tbe-ocean" was 
originally done by James B. Carson in 
the "Red Heads," and the "imagine" song 
sounds as if Benny Ryan had written it 
However, they were a laughing hit, making 
a speech at the finish. 

Eddie Foy and the Seven Foys were also 
a big hit The act has been rearranged 
since last seen, and is now one of the 
speediest singing and dancing novelties 
hereabouts. The children are growing and 
displaying more talent and several of the 
lyrics and jingles called for spontaneous 
applause. The material in the act by 
George Hobart and William Jerome, is 
of tbe scintillating variety. 

After the intermission, the Arnaut 
Brothers returned with their old routine 
of acrobatics, violin playing and whistling. 
The act is dressed a trifle better than here- 
tofore and did splendidly. 

Emma Carus and Larry Comer followed 
with several snappy songs and gags, and 
did finely all the way. The gag Comer 
tells about ""Rectors." and several of his 
ditties, could be dispensed with for the sake 
of wholesomeneas. Miss Carus. as usual, 
has her own individual method of singing 
songs and putting over the finishing dance, 
but we are nnder the impression that the 
patriotic nnmber at the finish should be 
done a trifle earlier in the act 

Doyle and Dixon attempted to offer a 
new routine ns an opening number, but In 
announcing an old time song and dance, 
they merely furnished an old song with 
sn np-to-the-minnte dance. The remainder 
of the act was reviewed in last week's 
issue. 

Odiva and her diving seals furnished 
the closing novelty of the bill and held 
them in nicely. The announcing was done 
by Captain Adams, who furnished the 
nndience with an idea of whBt Odiva was 
going to attempt and Rhe made good on 
all his speeches with grace and ability. 
. . S. L. H. 



PLAN PLAYS ON BOAT 

The Henderson Players, under the direc- 
tion of Alfred Henderson, are planning to 
give the first dramatic performance ever 
given on a Hudson River boat Sunday eve- 
ning. May 20, on a special stage erected 
in the dining room of tbe Benjamin B. 
Odell. 



ROYAL 

Royal audiences this week are having 
their fill of nut comedy between Frank 
Fay, Georgie Jesscl and Sylvia Clark. 
They are also having their share of music, 
every act, with the exception of the 
opener, containing at least several songs. 
Frank Fay and Frances White, the 
honeymooners, greatly interested the au- 
dience on Monday night. When Miss 
White remarked to William Rock, "You 
better not handle me so roughly, for I 
have a husband now who can lick you," 
the house fully appreciated tbe remark. 
Fay alluded to his wife several times 
during his act, and always got a laugh. 

The Levolos followed the Hearst-Pathe 
News Pictorial with a fairly sensational 
wire act, the value of which would be 
greatly enhanced if a couple of minutes 
were eliminated. Riding a bicycle on a 
slack wire was the most difficult feat per- 
formed in this turn and gained consider- 
able applause. 

Frances Dougherty and Alice Lucey 
followed. One of the girls sings, while 
the other accompanies her upon the piano. 
The girl who sings makes a very flashy 
appearance in a bright red cloak. Her 
voice seemed a trifle hoarse, although her 
songs seemed to go over successfully. 
The song about the fairy-book ball war- 
ranted the biggest hand. 

Georgie Jessel and Nina Martin are re- 
viewed in this week's issue of the Clifpts 
as a New Act under tbe billing of Barnes 
and Hilden which was their team name 
while playing the Audubon last week. 
The name of their act is "Chestnut 
Manor," written by Sam M. Lewis and 
Clark and Bergman. Its nut idea ap- 
pealed to the Bronxites, and the laughs 
that greeted the lines and the applause 
that followed their song numbers was 
liberal. The man makes the most out 
of his material, while the girl is a very 
charming and dainty partner. 

Al Gerard and Sylvia Clark cleaned 
up with their "Modern Vaudeville Frol- 
ics." Miss Clark's nut stuff pleased im- 
mensely. She seems to really enjoy her 
work and is thoroughly at home upon the 
stage, both of which qualities have a lot 
to do with the smashing hit she scores. 
Gerard has a good singing voice and 
makes the most of bis opportunities. 

Closing the first half of the bill was 
Denman Thompson's Famous Old Home- 
stead Double Quartette which will be re- 
viewed under New Acts. 
_ Frances White sang all about Missis- 
sippi, the monkey in the zoo, and six 
times six being thirty-six. William Rock 
sang his old man's song and told the 
yarn, in song, about the lady and the 
ship. 

The team actually cracked a new gag. 
At least, this reviewer has never heard 
them use it before. It was a bit about 
Browning and brought a good laugh. 

A group of youngsters were having a 
box party on Monday evening and the au- 
dience seemed to enjoy hearing this young 
group sing the famous spelling song. 

A burlesque on a pair of classic dancers 
was once rendered at the Palace by Rock 
and White and scored enough of a suc- 
cess to justify the team in making it a 
permanent part of -their act Yet thev 
do not seem to use it, although it would 
be a stronger number than their Impression 
of ragtime singers rendering a ballad, 
which went over weakly. 

Johnnie Dyer, Frankie Fay and Miss 
Walker had things pretty much their own 
way. Fay has a style of his own and 
carries the act over in great shape. His 
story at the end is too foolish for even 
a nut comedian to attempt and the team 
should close, instead, with the "wife and 
boarder" song. 

Grace Carlisle and Jules Homer faced 
a hard task in following two ciean-np 
acts with their quiet musical material 
but pleased nevertheless. The man ia an 
excellent violinist and the woman has a 
pleasant singing voice. H. G. 



8 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



May 9, 1917 




AMERICAN 

The Van Gamps opened the bill on the 
roof and presented an entertaining act 
which included prestidigitation and the 
antics of a little red pig., 

A man does the tricks and a young 
woman assists him. His routine is rather 
short but includes several well known 
magic stunts, the best of which is the 
bringing of a good sized young pig out of 
a lot of paper which the magician takes 
from a derby hat The little red pig is 
then brought on, and it is put through 
paces which give evidence of the little 
animal having been remarkably well 
trained. 

Victor Foster and Adele Ferguson, in 
"The Beau Brummel and the Debutante," 
made a well-deaerved hit. They open with 
a song and dance, follow with a little talk 
and then Foster sings alone. Miss Fer- 
guson follows with a song and again they 
give some patter. They make a good 
appearance, the young lady being very at- 
tractive. Their material is good, and 
they put it over to the best advantage. 
They were so well liked they were called 
upon to respond to two encores. 

Lazier, Worth and Company are a trio 
of very clever equilibrists. They do a 
variety of hand-to-hand raises and bal- 
ances, in which they all give evidence of 
great strength. Their feature stunt, at 
the finish, is one which they announce, is 
only accomplished by themselves. The 
tallest of the trio lies on Mb back on a 
table, raising bis knees, upon which one 
of his partners makes a hand stand. The 
third man jumps from a pedestal to a 
trampolin and, making a half turn, does a 
hand-to-hand catch with the man hying on 
the table. It is a remarkable feat, and 
made a very strong finish that won 
hearty applause. 

Lewis, Belmont and Lewis, two men and 
a woman, presented their comedy skit, 
"After the Matinee." The stout man in 
the act is a capable comedian, and his two 
partners act as good foils. The woman 
sings well. A special set represents the 
stage door of a theatre at which the 
woman is acting, and the two men, who 
conduct a store next door, scrape an ac- 
quaintance with her. The material is of 
the nonsensical kind which causes laugh- 
ter. It was well put over. The act was 
well liked. 

The Six Royal Hussare presented a 
musical offering which was well received. 
(See New Acts.) 

After the intermission. Ward and Shu- 
bert, man and woman, presented their 
songB and pianologue. The woman plays 
the piano and sings, and her partner sings 
also. They render their songs in a style 
of their own and get a lot out of them. 
The woman is a good pianist and rendered 
an instrumental solo that earned applause. 
The act pleased from start to finish and 
earned well-deserved recognition. 

Charles H. Smith presented a comedy 
skit entitled "A Case for Sherlock," 
which tells how a detective is fooled by a 
crazy man. There are three men and a 
woman in the sketch. The man playing 
the role of the detective and the woman 
as a chamber-maid did good work. The 
turn was well liked. 

Mumford and Thompson, two men, do 
a comedy singing act. The comedian en- 
ters as a stage hand and interrupts the 
straight as he is singing. Finally, the 
stage hand is induced to do a stunt and 
gives a recitation. He then changes to a 
misfit dress suit. There is a lot of ex- 
cellent comedy in the act as well as good 
singing. The straight has a tenor voice 
of excellent quality and much sweetness. 
A big hit and an encore fell to their lot. 
The Lelands, a man and woman, call* 
ing themselves "Artists De Luxe'," closed 
the vaudeville and scored heavily. They 
are "lightning artists" and do their work 
behind canvases which are in front of 
strong lights and are transparent. Among 
their paintings on Monday night were a 
landscape, a marine, and a snow scene. 
They are clever artists and deserved the 
approval extended them. E. W. 



FIFTH AVENUE 



A good bill and a. fall house tells the 
tale at this theatre for the first show of 
the week with a number of big time acts 
on the bill and Jonia and Milt Collins shar- 
ing first honors. 

Mabel Burke, with an illustrated song, 
opened the bill. Then followed Herbert's 
Canines, with a routine that drew ap- 
plause. 

The two Duncan Sisters open with one 
at piano. They sing a duo. A solo by 
one of the girls follows, the other joining 
In at the chorus. They then sing another 
duo, and for an encore one returns to the 
piano and the other renders an operatic 
selection in Italian. 

These girls are pretty, bright and viva- 
cious, and have pleasing personalities. They 
have good useful voices, and sing well 
whether together or singly. They are good 
entertainers, and know how to put their 
songs over. 

Arthur Sullivan and Ricca Scott pre- 
sented their comedy skit entitled "A Draw- 
ing from Life," which tells the story of 
a young husband who is too proud to 
work and lets his wife support him. 
Finally, the wife thinks she has stood it 
long enough and packs up to leave. This 
brings the husband to his senses, and he 
promises to begin the new week by going 
to work. To show that he intends to 
keep his word he borrows two dollars from 
bis wife. The skit was well played and 
was well liked. 

George Lyons, the harpist, opened with 
a set of complicated variations and fol- 
lowed with a routine made up of selec- 
tions on the harp, songs and a couple 
of short recitations. He was recalled 
many times and for an encore sang another 
number, while he played the accompani- 
ment on his little green instrument. He 
met with well deserved success. 

Bert and Harry Gordon are real enter- 
tainers, for they know that it is not so 
much what you do as the way yon do it. 
The title of their act, "The Impressario 
and the Novice," fits it well, and they 
carry It out through one of the boys trying 
to teach the other how to sing. 

The novice does not prove an apt pupil, 
and this forms a capital basis for genuine 
comedy. The boys have good material. 
Their dialogue in bright, witty and highly 
nonsensical. They do a little singing, one 
of them being the possessor of a good sing- 
ing voice, and scored the big comedy hit of 
the bin. 

Jonia. with her sister and four South 
Sea Troubadours, presented a good 
Hawaiian act. Jonia claims to be the 
only Hawaiian born dancer appearing in 
the United States. Anyway, she is a real 
dancer, which is more important. The 
sister dressed as a man does a capital 
dance with her and the two girls and 
three of the men play ukeleles while the 
other two men play guitars. One man 
sings a popular air which pleases, and 
then there is a guitar duo. followed by a 
solo on that instrument. The young guitar- 
ist is surely an artist. As a finish, Jonia 
gives a solo dance, while, her troubadours 
play the accompaniment. The .act went 
over big. 

Mfit Collins proved himself to be one 
of the best-liked monologists seen here- 
abouts in many moons. He calls himself 
"The Speaker of the House," and delivers 
a stump speech, most of which deals with 
politics and politicians. It Is all up-to- 
the-minute material, bright, crisp and 
witty, and Collins put it over well enough 
on Monday afternoon to so please his 
audience that he was compelled to respond 
to an encore. 

Laveen and Cross style their act "Julius 
and Brutus," and it is sn athletic act 
much better than the average. They are 
big men, but the understander is powerful 
and handles his partner ss though he were 
a feather. They do a really remarkable 
band balancing and equflibristic act. with 
a little mixture of comedy. In closing 
position fhey held the audience. E. W. 



CITY 



Albert Bouget and company offered a 
performance of balancing on tables and 
chairs, which was appreciated. 

Thomas and Henderson, colored come- 
dians, went big with their songs and 
dances, being especially adept at the latter. 
"A Soldier's Wife" is a talky, alow 
sketch, with a surprise finish, which goes 
a_ long way toward redeeming it. A mar- 
ried woman has come to the home of her 
lover, and promises to go away with him. 
But they are interrupted. The man sends 
her into the next room, taking the man who 
just entered for her husband. He bar- 
gains with him, and the supposed husband 
signs a statement that he will allow his 
wife to obtain a divorce from him, for the 
consideration of five thousand dollars and 
a promise of reinstatement in the army. 

When the certified check is turned over 
to him, the other man calls the woman 
from the next room, telling her that he has 
settled it with her husband. She says 
that he is not her husband, and then man 
goes out, saying thnt he would not interfere 
with his wife's divorce action. 

The Four Meyakos are offering their 
contortion, singing and dancing act, and 
went over big, as usual. 

Brown and McCormack present a com- 
bined dancing and acrobatic act, which 
won considerable applause. Their dancing 
is above the average and was liked. 

"The Girl in the Gown Shop" was a min- 
iature musical comedy which really con- 
tained some funny situations. It is clean 
and entertaining, although the singing is 
not its strong point. 

Carl McCullough, singer, recently with 
"Canary Cottage," was accompanied by a 
pianist, and rendered several songs and 
impressions satisfactorily. 

Soretty and Antoinette closed the show 
with an acrobatic performance. 8. W. 



JEFFERSON 

This is Spring Jubilee Week at this 
bouse, and a larger bill is being shown. 

George W. Moore did some juggling, 
which consisted of comparatively easy 
tricks. He got some applause with his 
last stunt, when he juggled a pan, coal 
scuttle, broom and shovel. 

The Lillian Steele Trio put over some 
old jokes, songs and dances, which were 
fairly well received. 

Jack Barnett is a clever and entertain- 
ing comedian, who went very big with his 
songs and impersonations. 

"Little Miss Flirt," a miniature musical 
comedy, proved mildly entertaining. The 
girla in the chorus could not sing nor 
harmonize, and with their beautiful cos- 
tumes made better background than singers. 

Peggy Brooks rendered her songs in a 
very pleasing manner, although there was 
a tendency to be alow and draggy. At the 
conclusion of her act, however, she was 
recalled for an encore. 

"Cheaters," a sketch by Homer Miles, 
was full of action and surprises, and kept 
up interest at a lively pace. The setting 
represented a railroad station, where a pro- 
fessional woman pickpocket gets the best 
of a detective. The playlet was liked. 

Bert and Birdie Conrad, in their clever 
routine, pleased, as usual. Conrad still 
features the impersonation of an Italian 
boy, singing a love song to a Jewish girl. 

Von Hampton and Shriner had an easy 
time getting laughs with their rapid fire 
skit . and -were rewarded with tremendous 
applause for their efforts. Their work fur- 
nishes plenty of amusement, and deserved 
its cordial reception. 

The Three Benards performed some 
strong teeth and acrobatic stunts, each of 
which got its share of applause. S. W. 



GRAND THEATRE 
STOCK IS OPENED 
WITH GOOD SHOW 

An entertaining bill was put on by the 
Grand Theatre Co., under the direction of 
Relkin and Levine, with George A Clark 
as producer, for the opening, Monday. A 
well filled house was in attendance and 
the various comedy bits, most of them laid 
along familiar lines, got laughs, while all 
of the numbers gained encores. 

An excellent cast of principals took 
good care of their respective roles, and 
the twenty-one classy girls went through 
their paces in mid-season style. 

George A. Clark, in his tramp make-up, 
was the principal funmaker, and with 
George Douglas and Charles Fagin as the 
other bums, the trio proved as strong a 
dancing combination as can well be 
formed. 

Fred Hall is a natty straight, and qual- 
ified as a singer in his duet with Helen 
Stuart, who, after appearing in several 
specialties, donned an evening gown for 
a rendition of "Poor Butterfly," which 
earned several encores. 

Michelina Pennctti was a strong singing 
factor, and "La Spagmola" was sung and 
danced by her in artistic style. 

Eva Lewis is long on looks and sonbrette 
talent, and her Apache dance, with 
Douglas, was well worked up. 

A patriotic finale closed the first part 
in stirring manner and brought all the 
Bast Siders to their feet. "A Night on 
the Isle of Gum" was the burlesque. 



STONE AND PILLARD 1 
PLAY RETURN AT 

THE COLUMBIA 

The return of Etta Plllard and George 
Stone to the Columbia, New York, was 
marked by a matinee audience which filled 
the house. Since the opening of the sea- 
son the show has been completely revised 
and many changes made in the cast. 

Miss Pillard, the acrobatic soubrette, 
turned herself loose without reserve, and 
George Stone unllmbered all the tricks at 
his command, with the usual result. 
* The supporting cast included Ben Bard, 
Lee Hickman, James McCabe, Teddy Du- 
pont, Lloyd Pedrick and Joe Schrode. 
Jessie Hyatt qualified as the prima donna, 
and in white tights, leading the American 
number, she was honored with several 
recalls. 



LAMBS OPEN PUBLICITY OFFICE 

The Lambs Club has opened general 
publicity headquarters at 1400 Broadway 
in order to advertise their public gambol 
which is to be held week of May 28 at the 
New Amsterdam Theatre. 



AMERICANS CLOSE 
, THEIR BEST SEASON 

AT THE OLYMPIC 

For a return engagement at the Olympic, 
New York, this week, Harry Welsh is fea- 
tured with Hughey Bernard's Americans, 
and a crowded house witnessed the matinee 
performance on Monday. 

Evelyn Stevens, Lola McQuay, Vic 
Dayton, Billy Barnes, who is a new comer 
in^ the line of German comedians: Ed. 
Miller, Sam Green and Hugby Bernard are 
the supporting principals. 

A successful number was the singing 
of old songs by various chorus girls, 
selected by Harry Welsh. 

MANY AIDED BENEFIT 

Among those who volunteered for the 
benefit given Harry Thomson, April 29, at 
the E. D. Turn Verein of Brooklyn were 
George Kane, Dan Harrigan, Billy Barlow, 
Frank Sherman, Harry Henry, Miss 
Josephine Leroy, Helen Brenner, Bob Les- 
ter, Dietrich and Emmel, Toyer and Dan- 
ner, May O'Dell, Taylor and Taylor, Allen 
and Clark, The Greater City Four, Nathan 
Frank, Harry Thomson. The orchestra and 
the ladies section opened the program with 
the "Star Spangled Banner," with the as- 
sistance of the' Turner Liederkranz, under 
the direction of Professor M. Mnhlet. 



May 9, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 




TAYLOR GRANVILLE A CO. 

Theatre — Bushwick. 

Style — Dramatic playlet. 

Time — Twenty minute*. 

Setting — Full stage special. 

The billing of tbia act calla for Taylor, 
Granville and Laura Fierpont in "The 
Panama Kid," a sketch produced about 
two years ago by Granville at the Royal 
Theatre under the title of "The Eyes of 
Bnddha," but which has been re-writ- 
ten since. The former title, according to 
the mind of the reviewer, is really the 
proper one for the act, as the entire bus- 
iness and plot is based upon the theft 
of a pair of emeralds from "The Eyes 
of Boddba." 

The story is that of a rich man being 
hounded by "Hindoos," who ransack hla 
home and attempt to shoot him for some 
mysterious reason, which he will not re- 
veal to the police or bis friends. But 
"The Panama Kid" solves the matter and 
recovers the stolen property. 

Granville plays the part of "The 
Panama Kid," with all the dramatic in- 
tensity necessary for such a part. Miss 
Fierpont, as a "Countess," is rather 
amateurish in her work, never seeming 
to be sure of her lines. John Sharkey 
as a police inspector reminds one of the 
work of George Fawcctt, playing his 
part with realism throughout. Edward 
VVonn portrays the role of a gem 
collector. 

The act needs a great deal of season- 
ing. A. U. 



JANE CONNELLY CO. 

Theatre — Eighty-first Street. 
Style — Comedy playlet. 
Time — Nineteen minutes. 
Setting — Full stage special. 

"A Cup of Tea" is the title of this 
new comedy of modern life written by 
Erwin Connelly. 

The plot of the story is a conventional 
one, but the material ia so constructed 
and presented that it places the act far 
above the average comedy playlet seen in 
two-a-day theatres. 

The story is that of a young man who 
is in love with a girl, and has not cour- 
age enough to propose to her. His 
father endeavors to help him out in this 
respect and the girl believes he is pro- 
posing for himself. She accepts, and 
the father then goes and tells the youth 
that everything is arranged for his forth- 
coming marriage. 

In the presence of the father the youth 
then tries to explain to the girl that be 
understands she has accepted him, and 
she, in turn, tells him that his father is 
the man and not he. Several funny sit- 
uations with witty lines follow. 

During this dialogue the father finds 
that he has got himself into hot water 
and, finally, at the request of the son, 
informs the girl that he desires to con- 
. tin ue through life in single blessedness 
and that the proposal was for the son's 
benefit. This explanation seems to suf- 
fice, but she accepts the boy. 

Both Miss Connelly and Erwin appear 
to better advantage in this offering than 
they did in their previous vaudeville 
vehicle. 

The act should be a welcome one on 
the two-a-day circuits. A. U. 



HAZEL MORAN 

Theatre — Palace, Staten Island. 
Act — Rope spinning. 
Time — Ten minutes. 
Setting— FuR stage. 

Miss Moran, late of the Girlies Gambol 
Troupe, is seen in her rope-spinning act, 
which she puts over in very good ■ style. 
The act is original for a woman, and her 
closing feat of spinning eighty-five feet of 
heavy rope out over the audience gives 
the turn a good ending, besides being quite 
a feat for a woman. H. S. P. 




SAM DODY 

Theatre— Kcencv's, Brooklyn. 

Style— Character comedian. 

Time — A T tne minute*. 

Setting — Special in one. 

Having had musical comedy experi- 
ence, Dody evidently feels as though his 
prestige might be hurt should he play 
under his right name in neighborhood 
theatres, for he has assumed the alias 
of "Bill Dalton." 

The opening of the turn is a novel 
one, he appearing in a monk's robe and 
delivering a recitation based on "A Per- 
fect Day." After discarding the robe, 
Sam comes out and finds that a clock 
calendar reads "Friday, 13th." He says 
this makes no difference, and then goes 
into his routine of parodies, songs and 
talk. 

All of the numbers and chatter are 
entertaining and, no doubt, if presented 
before a capacity audience, would have 
made considerable of an impression. But, 
as presented at a supper show, the ma- 
terial hardly impressed those witnessing 
it as being up to the standard of good 
neighborhood theatre acts. A. U. 



SIX ROYAL HUSSARS 

Theatre — America n. 

Style — Musical act. 

Time — Sixteen minutes. 

Setting— Full stage. 

The Six Royal Hussars axe women, 
who play cornets, trombones, tubas, 
drums, trumpets, bugles and a piano. 
They present a very attractive act, as 
they play the various instruments well. 
They open with the six playing trum- 
pets. Then four of them render a num- 
ber on cornets. This is followed by one 
of the women, who is a good coloratur- 
ist, singing. Then there is a trio with 
drums and bugles. Then a song to the 
accompaniment of a piano, two cornets 
and two trombones. 

This, in turn, is followed by a tuba 
quintette and the finish is with four 
cornets and two trombones playing a 
Souaa march. 

It is a veiy showy act. The women 
make three changes of costumes, all of 
which make a rich appearance. E. W. 



EVANS, LLOYD & CO. 

Theatre — Twenty-third Street. 
Style— Playlet. 
Time — Twenty minutes. 
Setting— House set. 

"The Alternative" is the name of this 
very unusual playlet. It calls for three 
characters : a police officer, bis wife and 
bis son. The son has been causing his 
parents considerable worry by bis ahift- 
lessness and loafing, and bis father has 
decided to call him to task. 

The action culminates in the son's 
murder of A police officer, his father dis- 
covering the crime and giving him the 
alternative of being turned over to the 
authorities — and perhaps the electric 
chair— or of then and there shooting him- 
self. The son chooses the latter, and a 
shot rings out as the curtain falls. 

The curtain then rises again. The 
whole thing has been a dream of the 
mother's. 

The father and mother act their roles 
very convincingly. The boy has a diffi- 
cult part and, in an effort to register 
realistically, is prone to overdo his char- 
acter. He rants entirely too much and 
needs considerable repression. 

The act is a good one, but is so intense 
up to almost its very end that even the 
surprise finish does not entirely dispel 
the "dark taste" from the mouth of a 
listener. H. G. 



JONIA A CO. 

Theatre — Harlem Opera House. 

Style— Hawaiian. 
Time — Ten minutes. 
Setting— Full stage. 

Jonia ia assisted by her sister and four 
Hawaiian boys. 

An Hawaiian dance opens the act. 
One of the members then renders a bal- 
lad solo. This is followed by an Hawai- 
ian instrumental number, in which all of 
the company participate. A waits duet 
is next The act ends with a hula, 
danced by Jonia, while the rest play their 
instruments. 

The act is an acceptable Hawaiian 
offering, and the finish would be even 
stronger if she would end her dance down 
center and hold a pose for the curtain. 
Jonia puts considerable grace into her 
dancing, and the only objection that 
could be raised is that this artiste does 
not dance enough. The act should find 
it easy-going on any bill. H. G. 



MAZIE AND THOMPSON 

Theatre — Palace, Staten Island. 
Act — Comedy talking. 
Time — Fourteen minutes. 
Setting— Plain drop. 

This act created quite a stir. 

It is billed as the "Penny Arcade." The 
plot concerns the efforts of a negro to hire 
another as a "general utility man" about 
the arcade. The act ia a roar from start 
to finish, and one of the pair who takes 
the part of the man to be hired, is a 
scream when he starts the "book" staff. 
The act ia not a real coon one, bnt the 
actors certainly get all the genuine colored 
humor possible into it. 

The backbone of the act ia the comedy 
that issues from the dialogue of the 'boas 
and the negro seeking the job. It should go 
over in any three n-day house. 

H. 8. P. 



ORBEN A DIXIE 

Theatre— Drlancey Btreet. 

Style— Song and dance. 
Time — Ten minutes. 
Setting— In one. 

This team opens with a ragtime song, 
which is concluded with a few dancing 
steps. The girl then sings a solo, which 
is followed by a dance, in which the man 
joins. The man follows with some step- 
ping, at which he proves to be an adept. 
Next, the girl sings and dances to the 
tune of a Dixie song. An impression of . 
two darkies dancing on the levee fur- 
nishes the close, the girl playing upon 
the harmonica and dancing at the same 
time. 

The pair should make good on any 
I/oew bill and their dancing, particularly, 
should go over for a smashing hit 

H. G. 



LEWIS AND LEOPOLD 

Theatre — Avenue, Chicago. 

Stylo- -Musical shit. 

Time — Fourteen minutes. 

Setting—/* one. 

Billed as "The Merry Men in Song- 
land," two men, young in appearance, 
bnt old at the game of jesting, turned a 
difficult spot into a vista of easy pick- 
ings, and from the time they put over 
their first song, beat their way into 
warm favor. 

While Walter Leopold sat at the 
piano, Bert Lewis sang "rag" selections 
and imitated all the pieces of a "jasz" 
band in action. Lewis was at his beat 
in "coon" singing. 

They took two bows and were en- 
titled to more, but the show was late. 



"LAUGHING HARRY" 

Theatre — Harlem Opera House. 
Style— Play let. 
Time — Sixteen minutes. 
Setting— Club room. 

"Laughing Harry" is unfortunately 
one of the most depressing playlets this 
reviewer has ever seen. It is excellently 
acted and well written, but these ad- 
vantages only serve to bring out the 
horrible result of war all the more 
realistically. 

A quartette of men at a club, singing 
"Tippernrjr," are awaiting the arrival 
of "Laughing Harry," who has just re- 
turned from the front. They recall past 
anecdotes about him, and the audience 
learns that Harry was a jolly, good fel- 
low, with a contagious, ever-happy 
laugh. 

When Harry finally arrives, escorted 
by an old pal, he is a different fellow 
than the happy, care-free man who 
went away to the front. Nothing bis 
comrades do can kindle the least spark 
of enthusiasm in his pale, care-knit 
face, and he sits oblivious to all that 
is going on about him. 

Finally, the boys sing "Tipperary" in 
an effort to liven things up. The tune 
brings back battle horrors to Harry, 
and he shrieks for them to quit. 

His friends decide that he is in need 
of rest and he is escorted away by bis 
pal. 

In order to give an excuse for pre- 
senting the play at the present time, 
the author has endeavored to teach a 
lesson, by making one of the slackers 
suddenly decide to go to the front and 
fight to avenge the horror that has left 
its mark on Harry and other English 
volunteers. But the ending seems a 
trifle far-fetched. H. G. 



"1917 FROLICS" 

Theatre — Palace, Staten Island, T 
Style— Musical comedy. ,j"' 

Time — Twenty minutes. 
Setting— Special. 

The "1817 Frolics" is a daintily cos- 
tumed act in a dandy setting, with a good 
bunch of girls. The material used is not 
new, merely being old stuff rehashed. 

There are nine in the company, six in the 
chorus and three principals. The young 
juvenile is a classy fellow, but he failed 
to pnt any pep Into bis singing, standing 
still throughout the turn, and bis voice 
was not audible In the center of the 
house. The eccentric comedian la good, 
although he slightly overdoes the part 
The female lead ia also good. 

The act ia put on in a lawn setting near 
a gate, with an illuminated house in the 
distance. There ia not a bit of plot to it 
The girls appear In five different cos- 
tumes, all very stunning, and many of 
which would make a Broadway Revue look 
sick. Several of the latest songs are 
rendered. 

On the whole, the act should get over, 
although it would be wise for the juvenile 
to improve his voice and put some action 
into his singing. H. 8. P. 



LA BERGERE 

Theatre — Colonial. I 

Style— Poring. 
Time— iVtne minute*. 
Setting— Special. 

La Bergere and her dogs pose for a 
series of statutes. 

The poses include the following sub- 
jects, in the order mentioned: "A Porce- 
lain Lamp," "At the Trail," "The Echo " 
"At the Well," "Retrieving the Bird," 
"Young Holland," "A French Clock," 
"A Morning Bird," "Azzeppa," "Dead 
Companion," "Off to the Hunt" 

Most of the poses are very artistic, 
although "The French Clock" is entirely 
too reminiscent of Robbie Gordons. 

La Bergere has an ideal form and 
makes a pretty picture. H. G. 



10 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



May 9, 1917 



B.F. Keith's Circuit of Theatres 

A. FAUL KEITH, rVaslasat. E. P. ALBKX. W w P i — . * On. Mar. 

UNITED BOOKING 



YOU CAN BOOK DIRECT BY 
ADDRESSING S. K. HODGDON, 

Booking Manager of the UNITED 

OFFICES 

B. F. Keith's Palace Theatre Building 

HEW YORK CITY 



Marcus Loew's Enterprises 

General Executive Offices 
Putnam Building, Times Square, New York 



JOSEPH M. SCHENCK 

General Booking Manager 



Mr. Scaanck Personally tatervtews Artists Dally Between U aod 1 

Chicago Office: North America* Butldtax 
FRANK Q. DOYLE, hi char re 



Boston Office: Tranoat 

.FRED MARDO. In chars* 



Acta laying off in Southern territory wire this office. 



C. BALFOUR 



A 
N 
D 



GILBERT 



LLOYD ■ WELLS 



in "You're in Love" 

MANAGEMENT — ARTUR HAMMERSTEIN 




\V»//»/M»mW/MM»//M,MWMMMMJ?m 



JEAN 



LEWIS and WHITE 



Thank the members of the United Booking Offices 
and Jenie Jacobs for the many kindnesses the past 



season. 



Opening in August to play all the United Book- 
ing Office time. 



V»W»»W» WW//M»/m/M »WM/»m/»MW>W/W>W^^ 



Bert and Harry Gordon 

In 

"Stop! You're [Flat"! 

At the 5th Ave. Theatre 

Were shifted from Fifth Position to Next to Closing 

Direction— MORRIS and FE 1L 



PHY|LE and PHYLE 



la Their latnt Comedy Success 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



4 Ft. 8 

of Ragttme 

In Wa, a F ri ar H a n c W s Inc., "The Suffragette Rorue." 
Under Personal Management BA RT. H. McHUCH 

LONO'Si^ 7|1 ,,THE ACT beaut, n ] '" 
u aw/a tta 1VJ& Vireetjrom the Islands 

LOOK FOR THE OPENING OF 

DAN BLANCO 

THE GRAND CAFE 

At Southeast Cor. Grand Ava. and North Clark Street, Chicago 



THE WORLD WONDER DANCERS 

Duplicating Their Chicago Success in Detroit 



" US CABARETERS " 

DONT MISS CHICAGO'S REAL ENTERTAINMENT CAFE 

lO— PERFORMERS— lO 
ENTERTAINER CAFE, 209 East 35th [Street 

EVERY NIGHT S TO I 

MLLE. MARION & MARTINEZ RANDALL 

IN DANCES AT GREEN MILL GARDENS e ighth successful week 



Herman's Cafe, Qoincy Street, Three Years 

SISTER OF "HERSHFIELD" ("ABIE KABIBBLE"), AGENT 



GLADYS SLOAN ESS 5 cSr 



INDEFINITE 



XOIVI FAXTON 

Of tha "Old Guard," Soon Cavorts From Bismarck Gardens to Colosimo's Cafe. 
Where He Will Feistize as Usual. Tom Can't Go Wrong. 

MAUD MASSEY— VAN BERGEN 

Directress DE LUXE CAFE ORCHESTRA 

INDEFINITE 



Lillian Rockley 

Australian Songstress 

At Better Class Cafes of Chicago 

Florence Stanley 

Late of ZiegfeJd's Follies, Presents 
Herself at the Winter Garden 

EVA LENTHOLD 

Little Bon Bon a la Zephyr 
WINTER GARDEN 



Florence Clifford 

THE MUSICAL COMEDY GIRL 
DE LUXE CAFE. 

LILLIAN BROWN 

IN NOVEL SONGS AND DANCES THAT 

YOU LIKE 

CAFE DELUXE 

THEATRE FOR RENT 

"Stock,?' "Vsnderille," Kotnies— Citr S0.0OO— 
wrnild consider partner nnderstandlns business 
end. Address "8T0CK," care OUPFER. 



Ma y 9, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



11 



MILITARY OPERA 
REVIVAL AT THE 
NEW AMSTERDAM 



"WHBN JOHNNY. COMES MABCH- 

INO HOME," — A patriotic military 
opera In three acta. Book by Stanis- 
laus Stance. Music by Julian Edwards. 
Presented Monday evening. Kay 7th. at 
the New Amsterdam theatre, . 
OAST. 
Gen. William Allen, of the Federal Army. 

Arthur Cunningham 
Cordelia Allen, bis daughter. 

Jnanlta Fletcher 
Fell* Graham, a southern planter. 

Percy Faraons 
Col. John Graham, his son, or the Federal 
Army, alias John Johnson "Johnny." 

Edward Basse 
Mrs. Constance Pemberton, a widow, cousin 

of Felix Bonnie Boyce 

Kate Pemberton, ber niece. .Nannette Flack 

Amelia Tbropp..... Elaa Garrette 

Susan Clay , Almee TorrUnl 

Also nieces. 
Robert Pemberton, Kate's brother. ' 

Jnlla Glfford 

Capt. Geoffry Martin Harrison Garret 

Major George Buckle George Burns 

Major William Walker Boy Raymond 

Of the Federal Army. 
Jonathan Phoenix, a ne'er-do-well. 
' . _ Maurice Darcy 
Dncle Tom, an old slave Wilbur Cox 



Nearly fifteen years ago F, G. Whitney 
presented tola opera at the New /York 
Theatre and doubtless believing that owing 
to its patriotic book and stirring music, 
would in these days of war excitement be 
most opportune, has revived it. 

The story deals with an interesting; 
period of the Civil War just before the 
surrender of Lee and the peace declara- 
tion.' The hero is John Graham, who 
bad years before ran away from home to 
escape a loveless marriage planned by his 
father. At the outbreak of war be Joins 
the Federal troops and becomes a colonel 
in a division commanded by General 
Allen. At the beginning of the play he 
is found near the place of his birth, where 
by fortune's chance he b stationed with 
his troops. While there he again meets 
Kate Pemberton, a sweetheart of years 
before, whom he had continued to love, and 
who in turn has been true to him. 

Kate'H brother, devoted to the cause of 
the South, is a spy, and hopes to get 
possession of plans . in the possession of 
General Allen. He forces his sister to 
aid him, bnt by mistake in an exchange 
of pocket books the plans get Into the 
purse of John, or "Johnny," as he la called, 
and he is accused of their theft, and is 
sentenced to be shot as a spy. He is 
saved by the heroism of his sweetheart, 
who tells the story of her brother's actions, 
and all ends happily. 

The music, the best the late Julian Ed- 
wards ever composed, is' truly patriotic, 
many of the songs popular during the 
Civil War being cleverly woven into the 
score, and during their rendition were re- 
ceived with much enthusiasm. "My Own 
United States," the big song of the opera, 
i« "a gem. and has for years been sung in 
the pnblic schools. So popular has It be- 
come that It has been seriously considered 
as the country's national song. 

Mr. Whitney has mounted the piece 
finely, and has gotten together a par- 
ticularly large company. Unfortunately, he 
has not made a good selection of his prin- 
cipals. Edward Basse. who plays 
"Johnny," while possessing a pleasing 
voice, has not the vocal strength which 
Hie music demands. Particularly in the 
"United States" song was his vocal short- 
comings noticeable. Kate Pemberton. 
Johnny's" sweeatheart. was' well acted 
and sung by Nanette Flack, and Bonnie 
Royce as Mrs. Coostance Pemberton, dis- 
played a pleasing contralto. 

Arthur Cunningham, made of Col, Will- 
lam Allen a strong and sturdy figure, and 
nls big baritone voice was heard to good 
advantage. Jnanita Fletcher, as Cordelia, 
nls daughter, brought a comparatively small 
part Into prominence. 

The chorus is a large and well drilled 
one, and brought out the beauties of Ed- 
wards? score far better than the principals. 

The production, which Is a massivevope. 

*■« with a grand patriotic finale Ailed 

The Gathering of the Allies." In which 

marching troops In the uniforms of the 

various allied countries assemble. 



SHUBERTS GIVE 

'THE HIGHWAYMAN" 
SPLENDID REVIVAL 



"TBS HIGHWAYMAN." — A romantic 
comic opera In three acta. Music by 
Reginald DeKoren. Presented Wednes- 
day evening. May 2, at the 44th Street 
theatre. 

CAST. 

Dick FItas-erald (Captain Scarlet), an Irish 

"soldier of fortune".. John Cbas. Thomas 

Lady Constance Sinclair, in lore with Dick. 

Blanca Saroya 

Sir Godfrey Beverly, a country baronet. 

Stanley Forde 
Lady Pamela, his daughter.... Grace FJorde 
Lieutenant Rodney, s yoong naval officer. 

Sam Aah 
Foxy QuIUer, a Bow Street constable. 

Jefferson De Aogells 
Dolly Primrose, with a romantic nature. 

Letty Yorke 
Toby Winkle, "Boots" of "The Cat and 

Fiddle" Teddy Webb 

Lieutenant Lovelace, a militia officer. 

Lawrence Cameron 
Lord Pbellm Kilkenny. .J. Sylvester Murray 

Sir John Hawkburst Osborne Clemson 

The Landlord James Murry 

The Constables... Harry Bulger, Jr., Will 

Montgomery, A. Oarbone. H. Hollands 

An Old Soldier Bichard Coombs 



"The Highwayman," designated by many 
as Reginald DeKoven's best work was 
given an elaborate revival by the Messrs. 
Sbubert, who in spite of the fact that the 
piece is twenty years old, had sufficient 
confidence in its merits to not only en- 
gage an exceptional cast of singers to in- 
terpret Its beautiful melodies, but gave it 
an exceptional mounting and costuming as 
well. 

Its story dealing with the adventures 
of Dick Fitzgerald, an Irish soldier of 
fortune, who, on account of being the vic- 
tim of a cheating card sharp has been 
forced to leave home and has taken to the 
road under the name of Captain Scarlet 
is familiar to all. His adventures as a high- 
wayman, pursued by soldiers and office™ 
of the law who, he, with little effort is 
able to outwit, and his charming sweet- 
heart who finding that the king has 
pardoned him. gets possession of the paper, 
although it Is in the hands of one of Dick's 
enemies, is a story which probably would 
not be selected for a comic opera of to- 
day, yet served as an inspiration for some 
of Mr. DeKoven's most tuneful melodies, 
melodies which have lived all these years 
and were as enthusiastically received on 
Wednesday evening as they were when 
New Yorkers first heard them, twenty 
years ago. 

John Charles Thomas, perhaps the best 
baritone in light opera, sang the role of 
Captain Scarlet and made of the highway- 
man, a dashing and attractive figure. Mr. 
Thomas was never in better voice and the 
singable melodies exactly suited blm. 

Blanca Saroya, a grand opera soprano, 
who In this production made her debut In 
light opera was Scarlet's sweetheart and 
if slightly lacking In histrionic ability she 
more than made it up by her beautiful 
singing. Her voice is a pnre soprano, clear 
as crystal and her solo numbers as well 
as the charming love duet with Mr. Thomas 
was a delight to the ear. 

Sam Ash, late of "Katlnka," scored one 
of the hits of the evening in the role of 
"Lieutenant Rodney," the young naval of- 
ficer. His song "Gretna Green" near the 
end of the first act was received with such 
enthusiasm that he was compelled to re- 
spond to no less than a half dozen encores. 

Grace FJorde, by her fine singing 
brought tile part of Lady Pamela into 
pleasing prominence, while Letty Yorke as 
Dolly Primrose, the romantic maid and 
Teddy Webb, the Toby Winkle, made an 
excellent couple. 

Jefferson De Angetls, the Foxy Qniller, 
was most amusing in the principal comedy 
role. The many "asides" of the part were 
responsible for much laughter, especially 
from the younger element of the audience, 
to whom they were donbtless a novelty. 

On the whole, the revival was a brilliant 



JANE COWL MOVING TO HARRIS 

Jane Cowl in "Lilac Time/' closes at the 
Kltinge Theatre Saturday night, and will 
moved into the Harris on Monday. 




1 JOHNNY 

DOOLEY 



AND 



YVETTE 




Desire to thank their many 
friends for all the good 
wishes upon their suc- 
cessful opening at' 

THE WINTER GARDEN 



* • 



a 



Not passably pleasing all 
but pleasingly passing all" 



12 THE NEW YORK CLIPPER May 9, 1917 



AT B. F. KEITH'S PALACE THEATRE, THIS WEEK, MAY 7 

CHARLES OLCOTT 

Offers his original travesty, A Comic Opera in Ten Minutes. 

My new one — "What a Fine Guy (Oil-Can) He Turned Out to Be," with apologies to Johnny 
O'Connor. 

NOTE. — To J. H. and C. C, "Please be nice children and let me keep my 'bells' bit. Help your- 
selves to the opera, I shall probably discard it next season." 

TO MY FRIENDS. — "Don't, by your constant reminders, of his copy, make the little fellow, 
who is doing my 'opera' bit on the indiscriminate time, feel any worse than his own conscience must 
make him feel." 

PERSONAL NOTE. — To Harry Cooper, may he never have my spot at the Palace, but may we 
always play Rochester together. Bless his soul, may it be a boy and name him Moe. 

Direction— JENIE JACOBS 



UR KI-EIIM PRESENTS 

BROADWAY'S SINGING FAVORITES 

IDA BROOKS HUNT, 
ALFRED DeMANBY I CO. 

IN 

"A FANTASY OF MELODIES" 

GEORGE HAL PERI N AT THE PIANO 



At B. F. Keith's Palace Theatre, This Week, May 7 



May 9, 191? 



fHI: Mew york clipper 



13 




Founded fa UH by Frank Qaasn 

Published by the 

CLIPPER CORPORATION 

OrUnd W. Vaochin.. .President and Secretary 

Frederick C Mailer Treasurer 

. 1604 Broadway, New York 
Telephone Bryant 6117-6118 
ORLAND W. VAUGHAN, EDITOR 
Paul C Sweinhart, Managing Editor 

NEW YORK, MAY 9, 1917 

Entered June 24, 1879, at the Post Office at 
New York, N. Y., aa second class matter, un- 
der the act of March 3, 1879. 
THE CLIPPER is issued every WEDNESDAY. 
Forms Close on Monday at 5 P. M. 
SUBSCRIPTION • 
One year, in advance, $4; six months, $2; 
three months, $1. Canada and foreign postage 
extra. Single copies will be sent, postpaid, on 
receipt of 10 cents. 
ADVERTISING RATES FURNISHED ON 
APPLICATION 



Chicago Office — Room 210, 45 S. Dearborn St 
Casts* Nathan. Max agu. 

Southwestern Office — 1125 Grand Ave. 

Kansas City, Mo. 

Ax. MixiHsoif. M "■»<•-»» 

Address All Communications to 

THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 

1604 Broadway, New York 

RtgitUrtd Cable Addren, "AtrrHOUTr." 

Tbi Cuim cast as obtained wholesale and 
sttatl. at our agents. Daw's Steamship Agency, 
17 Green Street, Charing Cross Road. London. 
W. C, England; Brentano's Newa Depot, 37 
Avenue de l'Opera, Paris. France; Manila. P. L: 
Gordon & Gotch, 123 Pitt; Manila Book and 
Stationery Co.. 128 Escolta Street, Sydney, 
N. S. W.. Australia. 

A Proper Decision 

"The Awakening of Spring" has been 
put where it and all so-called plays of its 
kind belong; in the discard. Justice 
Erlanger has decided that the work la on- 
fit for presentation on the stage of a pablic 
theatre and the society which asked for an 
injunction preventing Commissioner Bell 
from revoking the license of the theatre in 
which it was presented, has been rebuked. 

When the first of this style of production 
was brought from Germany several years 
ago and the city authorities refused per- 
mission for its presentation, a society was 
formed, and styled itself The Medical 
Review of Review*. The pnblic was led 
to believe that this society was made np 
of the leading lights of the medical pro- 
fession who organized for the sole purpose 
of enlightening the pnblic through the 
means of a propaganda to be presented in 
play form. 

The society proposed to give perform- 
ances which could be seen by Invitation 
only, such performances to be free. These 
"free invitation" performances were given 
for a couple of weeks and then the real in- 
tention of the society was disclosed. The 
play was announced as the regular attrac- 
tion of the theatre. Anyone who purchased 
a ticket was admitted, and the "play," 
which was foisted on the unsuspecting 
public as "propaganda," became a money 
getting enterprise which, after a New 
York ran was sent on the road. It la now 
being presented in England. 

"The Awakening of Spring," while treat- 
ing of a - different theme is in the same 
class as the "play" above indicated. It is 
propaganda, and the kind of propaganda 
that belongs in the clinic and the home 
and not on the public stage. It also comes 
from Germany where it is said to have had 
a great vogue. The customs of the two 
countries' are widely different, and what 
may be considered right and proper by the 
Tenton is not necessarily accredited by the 
Anglo-Saxon. 

We, of the United States, have our own 
ideaa of propriety and decency and we do 
not believe that the exposition, of Frank 
Wedekind, as disclosed In "The Awakening 
of Spring," conforms to these ideas. 

Justice Erlanger, in banning the Wede- 
kind work, has conferred a benefit upon 
the community in a double sense. He has 
stopped the presentation of the work which 
he deems an offence to pnblic decency and 
has probably prevented any future produc- 
tion, of this class, by the Medical Review 
of awawaVam 



Answers to Queries 

N. A. Q. — Frank Worthing was a native 
of England. He was leading man for 
Amelia Bingham in "The Climbers," when 
it was first produced at the old Bijou 
Theatre. He died several years ago. Tea, 
Robert Edeson was in the production. 

• • • 

A. D. F. — The first motion pictures 
shown in this country were short reels 
and were made chiefly with comedy sub- 
jects. The ocean waves and express trains 
were also largely used as subjects. 

• • • 

T. H. F. — The litigation over "The 
Devil" amounted to nothing, and several 
managers presented it through the country. 
Harrison Grey Fiske and Henry W. Sav- 
age presented it simultaneously in New 
York. 

• • • 

A. K. D. — Contemporary writers dis- 
agree as to the relative talents of Mac- 
ready and Forrest. Each had his follow- 
ers, and by them was considered the 
greatest actor of his day. 

• * • 

P. G. A. — Robert Billiard was among 
the first of the dramatic actors to appear 
in a sketch as a vaudeville headliner. He 
appeared at Keith's Union Square. 

• • • 

W. P. — You are both right. There was 
a Wallack Theatre located at Broadway 
and Thirteenth Street and another at 
Broadway and Thirtieth Street 

• • • , 

M. M. — Koster A Blals Music Hall was 
on Thirty-fourth street west of Broadway. 
The extreme western end of the R. H. 
Macy store is located on the site. 

• • • 

J. E. B. — Ann Mnrdock started her 
career under the direction of the late Henry 
B. Harris and at seventeen years of age 
was playing a leading role. 

• ■ a*. «a 

H. H. — Weber & Fields' musical hall 
(for several years known as Weber*a The- 
atre) was originally called the Imperial 
Music Hall. 

• * • . 

S. A. B. — Edmund Breese played the 
leading role in "The Scare Crow" when 
it was originally produced. 

• • a 

H. N. — Charlie Chaplin, Ford Sterling 
and Mary Pickford all won their popularity 
acting for motion pictures. 

• • • 

S. C. R. — Mary Anderson is now appear- 
ing as Galatea at the Coliseum, London, 
for a war benefit fund. 

• • • 

G. A. — Daly's Theatre was under the 
management of Klaw & Erlanger before 
the Shuberts had it. 

• • • 

C. S. T. — The American rights to "The 
Merry Widow" are owned by Henry W. 
Savage. . 

• • • 

A. C. C. — Robert Edeson appeared in 
"Classmates" and also "Strongheart." 

• • • 

E. E. E. — Franklin Sargent conducted 
a dramatic school before he located in the 

Empire Theatre Building. 

* i • • 

M. N. O. — Olga Nethersole's portrayal 
of Camille ranked with the best. ' 

• • • 

G. Z. — Julia. Art her was never leading 
lady at the Empire Theatre. 



TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO 

The Madison Square Garden Roof 
Garden was opened to the public. 

A benefit was given for the Central The- 
atre fire sufferers. 

New plays: "A Tin Napoleon," "The 
Councilor's Wife." 

Sim Williams was in stock at the Casino, 
Hot Springs, Ark. 

The Actor's Fund Fair cleared a profit of 
$160,000. 



EXPLAINS SEARJEANT SITUATION 

Editor, New Yobk Cluteb: 

Dear Sir: I wish to make myself 
clearly understood in my attitude, regard- 
ing which I was so wrongly accused by 
the White Rats. 

Mr. George W. Searjeant, his wife and 
son, stopped at my hotel for a long period. 
I did everything that was possible for the 
comfort of Mr. Searjeant and bis family. 
I permitted him and his family almost un- 
limited courtesies and he ran up a bill of - 
$141. I at no time embarrassed them by 
persistent methods or otherwise to pay 
their bill weekly or monthly. Mr. Sear- 
jeant at the time told me he was new in 
the field and was a little short of money, 
and I carried bim along .as I have stated 
above for quite a while. 

After he ran up this bill he moved. At 
that time I did not insist on payment, but 
told him to give me bis I. O. U. for the 
amount and at such time within the year 
that he saw his way clear to pay me I 
would expect a settlement. 

I carried this I. O. U. for some two 
years and at no time during that period 
did Mr. Searjeant, his wife or son make 
any effort to pay the bill, which was for 
board and room. 

I then learned that be had an account 
in the Night & Day Bank here, and I at- 
tached same to satisfy any suit which I 
may bring for the amount. In attaching 
this fund I found that he had $130 de- 
posited to his credit and in the name of 
Geo. W. Searjeant. After attaching this 
money and suing him in a Justice Court 
for the amount he owed me and after a 
fair trial I got judgment against him for 
the full amount of my debt. 

I later learned that this money was 
part of the White Rata union funds. Had 
I known that I surely would not have 
taken any action against the White Rata, 
as I can number among my friends hun- 
dreds who were at that time in good stand- 
ing in the organization. I have numer- 
our other actors' I. O. Us. to the amount 
of some $3,000. My reason for attaching 
Searjeant was that he was here and made 
no effort to pay. 

Mr. Searjeant in his feeling towards me, 
took up this matter with Mr. Mountford 
and the White Rats officials, and my ho- 
tel has been boycotted for some time. . 

It is absurd for anyone to think that I 
would fight any organization from whom 
I solicited my business. My only aim was 
to collect a just debt that was due me. 
Searjeant has succeeded in hurting my 
business, and I feel a great injustice has 
been done me by the White Rats in. tak- 
ing his side of the matter. I can cite a 
number of other instances to prove that I 
am not unfair to the White Rats organiza- 
tion, and I am satisfied that the fact that 
I took my case into court and after a fair 
trial was given judgment against Sear- 
jeant, proves that it was an honest and 
legitimate debt. 

Yours most sincerely, 

Elmer E. Campbell, 
Prop. Regent Hotel, 

St Louis, Mo. 



RIALTO RATTLES 



NEW CLUB DENIES HOSTILITY 
Editor, New York Clipper: 

Dear Sir: Rumors have been circulated 
among theatrical folks that the Actors' 
Social Club, located at 216 West Fiftieth 
Street, was organized for antagonistic pur- 
poses and was planning to reorganize, un- 
der the disguise of an order that has passed 
out of existence. I therefore beg to as- 
sure yon that the above club was incor- 
porated for social purposes only. 

Both laymen and professionals are 
eligible for membership and are encouraged 
to join. We merely ask the good will of 
all, as we have no ulterior motive. 

At a meeting held May 5, it was 
unanimously passed- that you or your rep- 
resentatives are cordially Invited to at- 
tend our next meeting, which will take 

place Tuesday afternooD at 4 p. m. Any 
questions asked will be cheerfully and 
frankly answered. With a watchword of 
"Sociability" and again inviting you to 
visit us, we beg to remain 
Very respectfully, 
The Actors' Social Club, 
Dr. H. Freeman, President. 
May 6, 1»17. 



RHYMED INTERVIEW, HO. 7. 

When everything is said and done, the 
man that has the glibbest tongue of all 
the press men that we know is Hamilton 
Thompson, of the motor truck show. 
Take anything upon the earth, hell string 
it out for all its worth into a yarn that 
sounds quite true, and then he'll dish it 
out to you. Even Billy Sunday's name 
fell in for lots of circus fame when 
Thompson asked him if he'd go and join 
Frank Spellman's circus show. He writes 
of motor trucks all day and calls the rail- 
road shows passe. He grinds out bushels 
full of news on clowns, and bolts, and 
tents, and screws. Now tell us, Thomp- 
son, if you can: Are you boosting a show 
or a motor truck van? 



IN GRIP OF WAS. 

War! "Johnny Get Your Gun" left. 
The chorus men took to the powder. The 
musical comedy soldier unsheathed his 
property sword. The Shubert press agent 
conceived a half-baked idea of planting 
potatoes in the rear yard of all Shubert 
Theatres (and growing half-baked po- 
tatoes). Every song- writer put Old Glory 
into ragtime. German comedians besieged 
Witmark to supply them with Irish bal- 
lads. Gadski found herself out of a fat 
job. And, taking all in all, Sherman was 
right! 



ASLEEP ON THE JOB. 

George O'Brien, the vaudeville agent, 
was seen in front of the Palace Theatre 
the other day reading the latest war 
news and weeping real tears. "What's 
the matter, George?" someone asked. 
"Just look at this," answered George, dis- 
playing a war headline, "There were 653 
men signed up for the army yesterday 
and I'm wondering who their agents 
were?" 



IRVING BERLIN, PLEASE NOTE. 

We would suggest to Irving Berlin 
that, since so many of the women are 
galavanting around in khaki uniforms 
and making themselves useless in many 
other military ' ways, there's a chance for 
him to revive his old song, "My Wife's 
Gone to the Country," changing the title 
to "My Wife's Gone For the Country." 

GOING CLEAN THROUGH. 

Joe Towle is going to tour the Orpheum 
time in his Stutz. If it should break 
down somewhere in the Rockies, be care- 
ful of your language, Joseph, for you 
must not forget that you have the clean- 
est name in vaudeville. 

» 
FOR THE FIRST LUTE TRENCHES. 

Writers of mother songs. 

Stage door Johnnies. 

.Hula dancers. 

Shubert chorus men. 

Re who says, "Nothing better tonight 
than the 17th row." 



CLEAR AS MUD. 

We asked Frank Orth the meaning of 
"The Lobby-Gobb," which is the title of 
a playlet he has written. "A lobby-gobb," 
he answered, "is one who gobbs around 
a lobby." So, now we know. 



PICK OUT YOUR THEATRE. 

And now Martin Beck comes along with 
a theatre. If this theatre building stuff 
keeps on, every theatre-goer will have a 
playhouse all his own. 



SPEAKING OF THE H. C. L. 

The high cost of living must be some- 
thing terrific, for "The Girl With a 
Million" is stranded. 



WHAT'S DT A NAME? 

Now that the war is on, Irving Berlin 
might decide to change his name to Irving 
Petrograd. 

OH! OH! 

A headline tells us that A. H. Woods 
has "Mary's Ankle." We wish to hear no 
more. 



14 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



May 9, 191? 




Words by Ed. Rose 



Music by Abe Olman 



arid March On To Success 



ABRAHAM LINCOLN SAID: 

"Von can fool some ot the people all of the time, all of the people some of the 
time, but you can t fool all of the people all of the time", and that is why we main- 
tain that we: are sincere when we assure you that our new list of songs will 
sweep the country. 

"ALL I NEED IS JUST A GIRL LIKE YOU" 



Words bv ADDISON BUR1 



Music bv ABE OLMAN 



"CLIMBING THE LADDER OF LOVE" 

Bv RAY WALKER, RAY SHERWOOD and ABE OLMAN 

"MY ROSE OF PALESTINE" 



DAVE RADFORD 



Music bV ABE OLMAN 



"iVIISSOLJRI WALTZ 

(HUSH-A-BYE MY BABY' 

Bv FREDERICK KNIGHT LOGAN 



"AT SEVEN, SEVENTEEN AND SEVENTY" 

IfpAiDDY: LOVED THE SAME SWEET GIRL) 

\s-' ..-.;. .... LMVMn\'?vrr.iv - M-wi.- i, v - ARF ni.MAX 



FORSTER MUSIC PUBLISHER, Inc. 



NEW YORK: 146 West 45th St., 

TOM PAVTON, ManiHjer 



CHICAGO: 42 Grand Opera House Bldg. 

MARVIN LEE, Manager 



May 9, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



is 




McWATTERS TO 

OPEN OWN 

CO.^OON 

CHOOSES SAGINAW FOR SUMMER 



Saolnaw, Mich., May 5.— W. O. Mc- 
wattera. at present leading man with the 
Fifth Avenue Stock Co., at the Fifth Ave- 
nue Theatre, Brooklyn, N. Y., will take 
oat bis own company in partnership with 
Leslie Webb, opening at Jeffers' Strand 
Theatre, here, June 2. 

Mr. McWatters has had his own stock 
companies for several years and had one in 
Saginaw last year, known as the McWat- 
ters, Webb and Melvin Stock Co. Miss 
Melvin is now playing leads with another 
organization. 

McWatters is engaging his people at 
present, and the company so far includes 
besides himself and Mr. Webb: Edith 
Bowers, Eleanor Toshelu, Edith Gray, Con- 
nor Kneuger, Lester Howard, Anthony 
Blair and O. W. David, scenic artist. 

Mr. McWatters will close in Brooklyn 
with the end of the season there, and will 
come to Saginaw immediately, where it 

is mostly likely the company will remain 
all Summer, the lease on the theatre having 
been taken from May 27 until August 25. 

ORR TO HAVE CO. AT DENVER 

Denver, May 5. — Opening June 1, Wal- 
ter D. Orr, of Chicago, will install a musi- 
cal comedy company of thirty-five people 
at Lakeside Park for fourteen weeks. The 
park management has bought the show 
outright for the engagement. High class 
musical comedies will be used, changing the 
bill each week. Mr. Orr has other stock 
engagements to follow the Denver season. 

ANGELL CLOSING IN PITTSBURGH 

Pittsburgh, May 8. — The Angell Stock 
Co., playing at the Park Theatre.. will close 
its engagement here the last of this month 
and play a park for the summer. The com- 
pany is owned and managed by Joe Angell 
and includes Ike Jntras, business manager ; 
Frank Root, Arthur Price, Charles White, 
Perry Norman, Robert Hillson, Alice Bow- 
dish, Alice Collison and Josie Fowler. 



ST. LOUIS PLAYERS SCATTER 



St. Louis, May 7.— The Players Co., 
which was forced to close its engagement 
here with the sale of the Players Theatre, 
expect to have another playhouse next fall. 
Mitchell Harris, who was leading man ol 
the company, accompanied by a party, in- 
cluding C. W. Egelhoff, honse manager of 
the Players Theatre, baa gone to New 
York by auto for a short vacation. Harris 
will go to Chicago to head the company at 
the Wilson Avenue Theatre and Chester 
Beach and Hason Robards, of the Players 
Co., will also be members of the organiza- 
tion. 

Marjorie Foster, who played leads with 
the Players for their final two weeks, has 
gone East and may return next fall. 
Arthur Holman has gone to New York. 
Daniel E. Hanlon, stage director, is re- 
maining in this city and expects to produce 
pictures here. Louis John Battels, Han- 
Ion's assistant, goes to Florida with his 
family. Esther Howard will be a guest 
of Bartel's parents on a motor car journey 
and Natalie Perry has gone to her home 
in New York. 



NORUMBEGA PARK CO. ENGAGED 

Boston, May 7. — The company engaged 
to support Gene Lewis and Olga Worth in 
their stock engagement at Norumbega 
Park includes Maxine Brown, Walter Van 
Boekman, Bettie Farrington, David Chase, 
James Brennon. Ada Lytton Barbour and 
Will White, stage director. Charles Ben- 
son is manager of the company, which 
opens Saturday, May 26. 

HILYARD TO OPEN SUMMER CO. 

Chicago, May 8. — Norman Hilyard and 
his Enterprise Stock Co. close their fourth 
season in Chicago June 3. Jones Linick 
and Schaefer have engaged the company for 
a summer run at the Star Hippodrome, 
opening June 4 with Nellie Hopper as the 
feature. 

HHVEHBO H IN MONTREAL 

Montreal, Can., May 5. — Haydn 
Stevenson has been engaged as second man 
with the Clark Brown Stock Co., opening 
here next Monday. 



HARTFORD OPERA CO. OPENING 

Hartford, Conn., May 8. — The Opera 
Players will inaugurate their second 

spring and summer season next Monday at 
Parson's Theatre. The opening bill will be 
"The Pink Lady." In the company are 
Mabel Wilber, prima donna; Dixie Blair, 
contralto ; Doris Vernon, Boubrette ; Joseph 
Florian, basso ; Howard Marsh, tenor ; 
William Kent, comedian ; Fred Smith, bari- 
tone; Billy Lynn, juvenile; Alonzo Price, 
director, and William Loraine, musical 
director. 

The season will be for eight weeks, dur- 
ing which time a new musical production 
may be tried out. The repertoire for the 
engagement is to consist of light opera and 
musical comedies. 



MYRKLE-HARDER CO. RETURNS 
Philadelphia, May 5. — The Myrkle- 
Harder Stock Co., which played a week's 
engagement at the Orpheum Theatre, Ger- 
mantown, recently, returned Monday for 
a limited engagement, presenting "Kick In" 
this week. The company is headed by 
Emma Myrkle and Jack Bertin and in- 
cludes Charles F. Ward, Ralph Brady, 
Jack Doty, Annie Everdon, Cora Davy, 
Fred Woodbury, Nella Russell, Ruth Amos, 
Jimmie Brown and Jack Holmes. 



SIDNEY TOLER EXTENDS RUN 

Portland, Maine, May 5. — Sidney 
Toler, who is appearing with his stock 
company at the Jefferson Theatre, has ex- 
tended his engagement there indefinitely. 
The company is in its fourth week, which 
was originally intended to be the length 
of the run, playing "The Passing of the 
Third Floor Back." 



NEW THEATRE 

FOR BARBARA 

KEIfM CO. 

TO BE BUILT IN OKLAHOMA CITY 



GLASER OPENING IN PITTSBURGH 

Pittbbuboh, May 8. — Vaugban Glaser, 
who recently closed his stock company in 
Cleveland, has secured the Alvin Theatre 
here, and will ImM his company there, 
opening next Monday in "Romance." Mr. 
Glaser plays leads as well as manages the 
company. 



FELLX WITH GRAND RAPIDS CO. 

Gran-d Rapids, Mich., May 5. — Edwin 
Felix is playing character part with the 
Temple Players at the Columbia Theatre, 

here. 

PAYTON CO. IN "45 MINUTES" 

Corse Payton and his stock company are 
presenting "Forty-Five Minutes from 
Broadway" at the Lexington Theatre this 
week. 



Oklahoma City, Okla., May 5. — A deal 
is on foot whereby a new stock theatre will 
be built in this city, in a downtown loca- 
tion. 

The Tucker Bros., who recently relin- 
quished their lease of the Metropolitan 
Theatre, where stock had been playing, are 
to build the new house, and William L. 
Tucker will be its manager. 

Barbara Leona Kleinz is expected to oc- 
cupy the new theatre with a new company 
of stock players. She recently closed an 
eighteen weeks' season at the Metropolitan 
and is at present playing nearby cities, 
but will close for the Summer. 

The Tucker Brothers took charge of the 
Metropolitan two years ago, at which time 
it was dark, and they gave it up now only 
because they were unable to secure a sat? 
isfactory lease for a longer period. Wil- 
liam L. Tucker, who acted as its man- 
ager, has assumed personal charge of the 
Dreamland -Theatre, another house con- 
trolled by Tucker Brothers. Other par- 
ties have taken over the Metropolitan and 
will remodel it for the coming season. 



NEW BRITAIN CO. CLOSED 

New Britain, Conn., May 5. — The Wal- 
ter Naylor Stock Co. at the Lyceum The- 
atre has closed its engagement and pictures 
are now playing at the house. 



MT. VERNON COMPANY OPENS 

Mt, Vernon, N. Y.. May 7. — The Asso- 
ciated Players opened here last week, pre- 
senting "The Higher Law," a four-act 
drama by Myron C-. Fagan. The company 
is headed by Sidney Bracy and Ormi Haw- 
ley and includes Gene' Lewis, John J. 
Power. Albert Phillips, Richard Brister, 
William Corbett, Kirk Brown, Augusta 
Perry, Edna Payne, Walter Downing, 
Sally Stanton and Edwin E. Vickery. 
"The Romance of Youth," by the same 
author, is being presented this week. 



CLEVELAND CO. OPENING 

Cleveland, O., May 6. — The Colonial 
Stock Company opens its ninth annual 
Summer season to-morrow, presenting "The 
House of Glass" as its initial attraction. 
The company includes Lily Cahill and 
Malcolm Fassett in the leads. Ben John- 
son, Jane Evans, second leads : Frances 
Yonge, Nancy Winston, ingenne: George 
B. Leffragwell. juvenile: Hermon McGre- 
gor, Cy Weaver. Henry Duffey and Hugh 
Reticker. director. 



NOBLE SIGNS WITH DAINTY CO. 

Dallas, Texas. May 5. — Horace V. 
Noble, after a long season playing Father 
Kelly in "My Mother's Rosary" on the 
International Circuit, has just signed as 
director with the Besse Dainty Players, 
opening at Cycle Park, here. May 26, in 
"Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm." 



PICKERT CO. PLAYING RETURNS 

Danville, Va., May 5. — The PIckert 
Stock Co. is now in its fifty-fifth week and 
is booked for thirty weeks in advance on 
return dates. It will open May 14 on 
Pennsylvania time for the Spring and 
Summer season. Parks will be played dur- 
ing July and August. The roster of the 
company is as follows : The Pickert Sisters, 
Lillian and Blanche, Willis Pickert, Eliza- 
beth Pickert, Clint Dodson, Erlan H. Wil- 
cox, Master Erlan, Baby Carol and Baby 
Blanche, Ralph Chambers, Al. Williams, 
Walter Boggs. Mabel Gypzene, C D. 
Peruchi. Bob. Maclntrye, W. C. Powers 
and Win. Owens. 



HANLON TO PRODUCE PICTURE 

St. Louis. May 5. — Daniel E. Hanlon, 
who has been directing the Players' Stock 
for the last thirty-six weeks, has been 
engaged by the St. Loui* Timet to pro- 
duce a large five-reel motion picture drama 
which is to feature their eighteen popu- 
larity contest winners. 



HALL JOINS PORTLAND, ORE.. CO. 

Portland. Ore., May 5. — Henry Hall is 
the new leading man with the Baker Play- 
ers, having joined Monday in "A Pair of 
Sixes." 



ALCAZAR, FRISCO. OPENING 

San Francisco, May 5. — The stock com- 
pany at the Alcazar Theatre is due to open 
Monday with "Mile-a-Mihute Kendall." 



AMES TO PRODUCE NEW FARCE 

Winthrop Ames has in rehearsal a new 
farce by W. J. Hurlburt, entitled "From 
Saturday to Monday," which will be pre- 
sented for the first time at the Belasco 
Theatre. Washington, next week. Rath 
Maycliffe (Princess Braganza LVAvellar) 
will portray the leading feminine role. It 
will not be seen in New York until next 
Fall. 



EDWARDS ABANDONS 3 CO. PLAN 

Hamilton. Can., May 5.— The project 
to have a summer season of stock at the 
Grand Opera House has falleu through. 
Mr. Edwards could not complete his three- 
way plan of companies at Hamilton, To- 
ronto and Ottawa. Feature photo plays 
will be shown for the season, with weekly 
changes. 



CLAY JOINS BLEECKER PLAYERS 

Albany, N. Y.. May 17. — Clinton Ten 
Eyck Clay, recently with Sir Herbert Tree 
playing the regular season, has joined the 
Bleecker Players stock for the Summel 
and will take a leading part in "Rolling 
Stones" and other comedies. 



LUTTRINGER CO. IN BOSTON 

Boston, May 5. — Al Luttringer is at the 
head of the Luttringer Stock Co., which 
opened its engagement at the Bowdoln 
Square Theatre Monday in "A Western 
Romance." "St. Elmo" will be the attrac- 
tion next week. 



CLIFF HYDE WITH BOYER CO. 

Battle Cbeek. Mich., May 5. — Cliff 
Hyde closed his season with the Billy Allen 
Musical Comedy Co. and joined the Nancy 
Boyer-Arthur Chatterdon Stock Co., which 
opened here recently in "Arms and the 
Girl." 



EDISON CO. HAS NEW SCENERY 

Messrs. Foreman and Morton, managers 
of the Madge Edison Stock Co., have some 
new scenery painted by the Rohme Scenic 
Studios for their next season productions. 



ELSIE BARTLETT AT LEXINGTON 

Elsie Bartlett opened Monday as lead- 
ing lady for the Corse Payton Stock Co. 
at the Lexington Theatre, appearing in 
"Forty-Five Minutes from Broadway." 



"PASSING SHOW" GIVES MATINEES 

The Winter Garden management has de- 
cided to give matinees every Tuesday, 
Thursday and Saturday during the Summer 
run of "The Passing Show of 1917." 



HOEFFLER'S CO. TO PLAY PARK 

Qutncy, 111., May 6.— The Williams 
Players, Jack Hoeffler's dramatic stock 
company, will play a summer season at 
the Park open air theater. P. J. Breinig, 
of Terre Haute, will be in charge of the 
orchestra. 



MEADE JOINS WADSWORTH CO. 

Toledo. O.. May 8. — Dwight Meade has 
replaced Ted Woodruff as leading man with 
the Wadsworth Stock Co. at the Palace 
Theatre. 



KANSAS CITY CO. CLOSES 

Kansas Crrr. Mo., May 5. — The Opera 
Players closed their engagement at the 
Grand Theatre recently, but will, most 
likely, return in the Fan. 



WALTER TO PRODUCE "ASSASSIN" 
Eugene Walter is rehearsing "The As- 
sassin," of which be is the author, and 
will produce it shortly under another name. 



LEE BARCLAY JOINS OLIVER CO. 

La Fayette, Ind., May 5. — Lee Barclay 
has joined the cast of the Oliver Players 
at the Family Theatre. 



16 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



May 9, 1917 




POLACK BROS. 

ENLARGE 

OUTFIT 

SHOW OPENS IN PITTSBURGH 



Pittsbubch, May 5. — Harry and Irving 
l'olack, owners of the Rutherford Greater 
Shows, have a greatly enlarged organiza- 
tion and an almost entirely new outfit 
this seasou. The shows were opened on 
the Sbarpsburg exhibition lot here recently. 

The complete list of attractions com- 
prise : three riding devices, including a 
four-abreast carrousel, Eli Ferris Wheel 
and "The Whip," all three attractions 
owned and managed by Joseph Krouse, 
with the assistance of his wife : a spectacu- 
lar and massive reproduction of the present 
European war, entitled "Destruction: or 
The World at War," the work of Prof. 
Armond : Rice's Submarine Girls or Diving 
Venuses : the Monkey Speedway, operated 
by Will Run McCurdy. and "Hazel ; Is She 
Dead or Alive?" owned by C. C. Brooks. 

Mrs. Brooks has a concession store and 
looks after "Spidora," operated by Jessie 
Lee. Charles Lorenzo is general manager 
of the Brooks attractions. "Lenoora," a 
terpsichorean classic in mirror and fire 
dancing, and Mile. Tbeo's Poses Plaatique 
are managed by Mrs. Will Run McCurdy. 

"Stop, Look and Listen" is a combined 
"Crazy House." "Submarine" and "Trip 
to Mars." 

Beastly and Anger did not arrive with 
their 20-in-l Show and Harry Polack has 
replaced them with another attraction. 

Prof. Wm. Fink's band of twenty soloists 
render music from a bandstand situated in 
the middle of the Midway. 

The executive staff is composed of Po- 
iack Bros., proprietors: Harry R. Polack, 
manager ; Percy Morency, assistant man- 
ager; Ed. R. Salter, press agent and treas- 
urer; Harry Bryan, general agent; George 
Alabama Florida, Mo Glanz and Charles 
McKinney. promoters: Jack Weiser, ad- 
vance agent: Fred Kelly, lot superinten- 
dent : Homer Briggs, concession manager : 
John Knoital, master of transportation, 
and Elmer Bigdon. electrician. 

The concession stores present many nov- 
elties and are presided over by Leo Fried- 
man, Messrs. Samuel and Charles Law- 
rence, Mrs. Julia Sklower. Jos. Delmonte, 
Newark Bright. T. A. Bradshaw and about 
fifteen others, assisted by about eighty-five 
clerks. Bernard Wallace, nephew of Col. 
B. E. Wallace, has the refreshment car. 

It requires twenty-five cars to transport 
the show. 



AUTO CIRCUS DELAYED 

Cincinnati, May 7. — The automobile 
circus of the United States Circus cor- 
poration, of which Frank Spellman is 
President, and most of which is being built 
here by the Bode Wagon Works, win not 
open in this city on May 30. The opening 
is delayed until early in June, because, it 
is announced, the automakers are handi- 
capped by slow production of parts. 



CHARMER SUED FOR DIVORCE 

Cincinnati. Ohio, May 5. — Attilio 
Xaticchioni has bronght suit for divorce 
azainst Mary Xaticchioni. a snake charmer 
whn has appeared with several circuses. 
The testimony included a letter, read in 
court, in which the wife mingled affection 
for her husband with accounts of being 
bitten by rattlesnakes, and told of writing 
"between her snake acts." 



CLEVELAND LUNA PARK OPENING 

Cleveland. 0.. May G. — Luna Park is 
scheduled to open next Thursday under the 
management of Col. C X. Zimmerman. 
Improvements are now under way and a 
new dance hall and roller rink are being 
added. 



CENTENNIAL IS POSTPONED 

Gtjlfpobt, Miss., May 5. — The Missis- 
sippi Centennial Exposition, which was 
scheduled to be held in this city, opening 
Dec. 10, has been postponed until 1919. 
The opening date will probably be fixed 
for Feb. 22. 1919. The reason for post- 
poning the centennial was given as the 
President's proclamation, suggesting that 
all celebrations be set aside while the nation 
is preparing for war. Construction work 
will continue. 



GIRL RIDERS INJURED 

Wilmington, Del.. May 5. — Two riders 
with the O. E. Autodrome, were badly in- 
jured while racing at the close of the per- 
formance recently. They are Olive Hagar 
and Wanda Sweeny and both are in a 
local hospital. Miss Hagar suffering with 
a broken arm and several minor injuries 
and Miss Sweeny suffering with several 
broken ribs and a badly lacerated head. 



FAIR ASSOCIATION WINS 

Montrose, Colo., May 4. — Nettie Horn- 
beck has lost her suit against the Western 
Slope Fair Association for injuries received 
in an accident, when her horse, which she 
was riding in a ladies' relay race during 
the fair of 1912, bolted through the bars of 
the track and threw the rider. The suit 
was for $2,500. 



APGAR IS PUBLICITY AGENT 

Newbuboh, N. T., May 7. — G. W. 
Apgnr has taken charge of the publicity 
for Orange Lake Park, which is under the 
management of the Orange County Trac- 
tion Co. Apgar was formerly manager of 
Bay View Park, Atlantic Highlands, N. J. 



SPRING CITY PARK IS LEASED 

Spring City, Pa., May 5. — The Bonnie 
Brae Amusement Co. has leased the Bonnie 
Brae Park to Messrs. Schirmer & Corey 
who will open the amusement resort for the 
season May 30. Many improvements are 
being made preparatory to opening. 



THEATRE BUYS CIRCUS LOT 

Sak Francisco. May 5. — The old circus 
lot at Eighth and Market Streets, on which 
the A! G. Barnes Circus was the last to 
show recently, has been sold and a theatre 
will be erected on the site. 



REISS SHOWS OPEN 

East Chicago, Ind., May 5. — The Fa- 
mous Nat Reiss Show, Inc., opened its 
season here last Saturday night, continuing 
here all this week. Mrs. Nat Reiss is in 
charge of the organization. 



MRS. EASTMAN SERIOUSLY ILL 

Memphis, Tenn., May 5. — Mrs. Llew- 
ellyn Eastman, wife of the secretary of the 
Hasson & Clark Broadway Shows, is 
seriously ill in a local hospital, suffering 
from blood poisoning. 



JAMES JACOBS DEAD 
Mablinton, W. Va.. May 5. — James 
Jacobs, well known boss hostler, for several 
years with Sparks' Shows, dropped dead 
last Saturday shortly before the night per- 
formance began. 



CHAMBERS RETURNS TO CANTON 

Canton. O.. May 5. — Larry Chambers, 
who was treasurer of Myers Lake Park 
last season, returned recently and will be 
treasurer with the park again this season. 



ORTON BROS. CIRCUS OPENS 

PlTTSBDBOH. May 5. — The Orton Bros. 
Circus opened their season Thursday, the 
opening having been postponed from April 
28 on account of the late Spring. 



KEYSTONE SHOWS OPEN 

Philadelphia. May 5. — The Keystone 
Exposition Shows, organized by Sam Me- 
chanic and Simon Krause. opened its season 
here recently. 



PALISADES PARK 

MAKES NEW 

ADDITIONS 



MANAGERS ANTICIPATE BIG YEAR 



When Palisades Park opens on Saturday, 
Nicholas M. Schenck, of Schenck Brothers, 
owners, predicts that it will start the most 
successful season of its history. He states 
that many improvements have been made 
and that more than $75,000 has been spent 
in making additions. 

As heretofore, the swimming pool will 
be the main attraction, and will be open 
night and day. About two bandied more 
dressing rooms have been added for the 
convenience of swimmers. 

Among the additions is a new street on 
the midway where a number of small new 
concessions have been rented out. 

More than $50,000 has been spent, it is 
said, in the erection of a new ride, which 
will be known as "The Witching Waves." 
A new electric auto ride called, "The Mon- 
key Auto Race," will also be put into 
operation. 

All of the old concessions will remain. 

An Italian Band has been engaged to 
give a twice daily concert and three free 
acts will be booked every week. 

Nicholas M. Schenck will act as general 
manager of .the Park. Edward Mannix 
will be superintendent, and George Spring- 
time Henschall has accepted the role of 
publicity purveyor. 



FAIRBANKS GIVES DONATIONS 

Terse Haute, Ind., May 5. — Crawford 
Fairbanks, one of the largest stockhold- 
ers of the Hagenbeck- Wallace Circus, who 
has spent the winter at Miami, Fla., ar- 
rived home Monday. Fairbanks has donated 
his residence to the Red Cross Society, has 
given his Riverside site to the city for 
a public park and donated $15,000 to the 
Rose Polytechnic Institute School since his 
arrival. 



CINCINNATI PARK TO OPEN 

Cincinnati, May 8. — Chester Park 
opens its vaudeville season next Snnday 
with the following bill, booked by Gus Sun : 
Jack Levy and the Four Symphony Girls, 
Laypo and Benjamin, Van and Hazen, 
Floyd and Beamen and Grace Wasson. 



STEARN ON ROBINSON No. 1 CAR 

Elgin. 111., May 5. — The No. 1 advance 
car of the Yankee Robinson Show is this 
season in charge of F. C. Stern. Ernest 
Bird is bass billposter, and has nine as- 
sistants, making eleven men in the car. 



CIRCUS CANCELS TERRE HAUTE 

Terbe Haute, Ind., May 5. — The Sells- 
Floto Circus has cancelled next Saturday's 
date at Terre Haute on account of its 
route being changed. Crawfordsville will 
be played on that day. 



McMANN WITH SELLS-FLOTO 

Elgin, 111., May 5. — Fred C. McMann is 
again in charge of the No. 1 advance car 
of the Sells-Floto circus, and Perry Power 
is boss billposter with eighteen assistants. 
Al Butler is also on the car. 



CIRCUS MAN A PLAYWRIGHT 

St. Louis, May 5. — Charles F. Clark, of 
Clarkonians, with the Ringling Circus, has 
written a military playlet and is looking 
for a producer. 



MUARES WORK SINGLE 

St. Louis, May 5. — The Great Mijares 
and his brother have discontinued their 
act with RingUng*s. Each is now working 
single in rings one and three. 



CORA BECKWI f H PLANS 2 ACTS 

Dubuque, Iowa, May 6. — Cora Beek- 
with is busily engaged getting two big 
swimming and diving shows ready for the 
Summer season. She has contracted to 
present her show throughout the Middle 
West and South at the more important 
fairs and expositions and is framing an- 
ot' er act for a carnival company, which 
begins its season in about three weeks. 



BRONX EXPO WORK STARTED 

Development work began last week un- 
der the direction of Charles Scott Landers, 
on the twenty-five acre William Waldorf 
Astor tract at the East One Hundred and 
Seventy-seventh Street subway station and 
the Bronx River, for the erection of the 
buildings of the Bronx International Ex- 
position. The exposition is not expected 
to be opened before May 30, 1918, the war 
with Germany having caused the postpone- 
ment. 



CIRCUS DRIVER KILLED 
Warsaw, Ind., May 6. — Archie Paul, a 
driver for the Coop & Lent Circus, which 
showed here- last Friday, was crushed to 
death by a wheel of a wagon, from which 
he fell while driving through one of the 
downtown streets. 



ANNIE OAKLEY DRILLS WOMEN 

Nutlet, N. J., May 8. — Annie Oakley 
will drill the members of the Women's 
Club to-day in the handling of firearms. 



NEW DIRECTOR IN N. O. S. A. 
Frank Fuller, secretary of the Tri-State 
Fair, has been elected to the Board of 
Directors of the National Outdoor Show- 
men's Association. 

EIGHT "PROPS." JOIN NAVY 

Joseph Forsythe, Harold Wenstrom, Shad- 
die Graham, Alfred Dagostino, Sherrie 
Sarris, Jack Sweeney, William Sweeney 
and James Sweeney, eight young property 
men of the Metro-Rolfe-Columbia studios, 
last week enlisted in the United States 
Naval Reserves in a body. They were as- 
sured by B. A. Rolfe, bead of the studio, 
that their positions would be open for them 
on their return. 



H1LLIARD FOR "SCRAP OF PAPER" 

Robert Hilliard has been engaged to 
star in "The Scrap of Paper," Owen 
Davis' dramatization of a story by Arthur 
Somers Roche, which appeared in the Sat- 
urday Evening Pott, and which A. H. 
Woods will put into rehearsal shortly. It 
will be presented in New York next sea- 
son, most likely under a new title. 



LAMBS NEED NOT CLOSE 

The Lambs Club does not have to comply 
with Mayor Mitchell's request that all bars 
and places of entertninment be closed at 
1 o'clock at night- Being a private club 
and not in any sense a restaurant or 
cabaret, the Lambs cannot be compelled to 
close at any specified hour. 



KELLERMAN TO REST 

After completing her engagement at the 
Hippodrome last Saturday night Annette 
Kellennan left for her country home in 
Douglas Manor, Long Island, where she 
will remain for several weeks prior to 
beginning work on a new feature film for 
the Fox Film Corporation. 



SHERIDAN OFFERS FARM 
Frank Sheridan, the actor, last week, 
offered to contribute twenty-five acres of 
his farm at Chatham, N. Y., for the use 
of stage mechanics employed in the Shu- 
bert theatres. 



FOREST THEATRE NEARS END 

Philadelphia, May 5.— This will be 
the last season of the Forrest Theatre as 
it has been purchased, together with ad- 
joining land, by the Fidelity Trust Co., 
which will erect, a .skyscraper .office build- 
ing on the combined sites. 



May 9, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



17 



WESTERN OFFICE, 

Room 210 

35 SO. DEARBORN ST. 




HIC 




FOR ADVERTISING 

RATES 

Phone Randolph 54Z3 



CHICAGO OPERA 

TO GO ON 

TOUR 



WILL VISIT LARGER CITIES 



The Chicago Opera Co., of which Cleo- 
foute Cumpanini is general director, has 
scheduled a tour prior to the opening of 
the regular Chicago season. 

The route will begin in October and will 
include many of the larger cities. The 
company will go to New York, probably to 
the Lexington Avenue Opera House, open- 
ing some time in January. 

Charles G. Dawes, chief of the grand 
opera company directorate, is busying him- 
self with extensive plans, so arranged that 
the proper repertoire may be given in each 
city visited. 

Last season a similar tour was carried 
out, under the direction of Charles A. 
Ellis, of Boston, who used the Chicago 
company's chorus and orchestra in addition 
to some of the principals. However, the 
tour this year will be purely a Chicago ven- 
ture, under the direction and control of 
Campanini. 

Lueien Muratore will top the male stars 
aud Amelita Galli-Curci and Genevieve 
Vis, a recent acquisition to the company, 
will share honors as female stars. 

The tour has been arranged to do away 
with the inconvenience of local rehearsals 
and to increase the company's efficiency for 
the Chicago engagement. 



COLOSIMOS IS RAIDED 

Colosimo's restaurant at Twenty-second 
Street and Wabash Avenue, long known 
as a professional rendezvous, was raided 
last week. Th'e proprietor, "Abit" Arends, 
manager, and ten waiters were arrested. 
Freiberg's place, on Eighteenth street, met 
with a similar fate. Both raids resulted 
from alleged violations of the Sunday clos- 
ing law. 



HITCHCOCK CLOSES IN "BETTY" 

Raymond Hitchcock has closed his en- 
gagement at the Illinois Theatre, in 
"Betty" and returns to New York to begin 
rehearsals in "Hitcby Koo," the musical 
piece he is producing in conjunction with 
Ray Goetz for a Spring and Summer run. 
It will be seen at the Cohen & Harris 
Theatre, New York. 



STAUFFER PLANS PRODUCING CO. 

Aubrey Stauffer, who prepared the score 
of "September Morn," is laying plans for 
the incorporation of a big producing com- 
pany which will bear his name. It is his 
intention to produce original shows for 
Chicago and New York runs. 



JONES SICNS WITH GOLDWYN 

Aaron J. Jones is personal representa- 
tive in Illinois and Indiana for the Gold- 
wyn releases. F. M. Brockell, one of 
Jones' associates, will become manager of 
the local branch in the Rialto building, 
June 15. 



"CRISIS" COMES TO COLONIAL 

"The Crisis" feature photoplay came to 
the Colonial Sunday for an indefinite run. 
"Joan the Woman" closed at the same 
theatre Saturday night 



BEVERUNG GOES TO PALACE 

R. Beverung, formerly in the treasurer's 
office of the Majestic Theatre, is now a 
box office attache of the Palace Music Hall. 



OLD TIMERS ARE HERE 

Many old-timers, closely identified with 
the music publishing field in Chicago, re- 
turned to the city last week. Tom Mayo 
Geary, formerly professional manager for 
Harold Rossiter, was seen in the loop. 
James Sumner, frequently rated one of the 
best "writing" professional managers, also 
drifted into town. Charley Straight, who 
played and wrote for Remick's Chicago of- 
fice last year, was seen lingering in pro- 
fessional rooms. Bob Roberts who de- 
serted the keys to lead an orchestra on 
the road, was around "between shows." 
Milton Weil, who formerly was in business 
here, sprinted around the Loop as repre- 
sentative for Maurice Richmond. Geary is 
no longer connected with the publishing 
field. Sumner, who has been mixed up 
with the booking game, is now working for 
Waterson's Chicago office. 



FILM THIEF CONVICTED 

Herman Abrnmovitz, alias Herman 
Abrams, was convicted last week on a 
charge of having received and sold three 
Charlie Chaplin comedies stolen from the 
Mutual Film Corporation. It was alleged 
that the films were abstracted from the 
vaults of the corporation in Chicago last 
September and disposed of by Abrnmovitz 
to a dealer in Omaha, who sold them to 
McLean & Walters, proprietors of the Lyric 
Theatre in Sioux City. Iowa. The case 
was disposed of by Judge Crowe in the 
Criminal Court, last Thursday. 



RIDINGS IN FILM CO. 

Harry Ridings, manager of Cohan's 
Grand' Opera House. Joe M. Harris, Fred 
C. Aiken, M. J. Quigley, Michael Michael- 
son, Herbert Baumgarten and Edmund M. 
Allen, formerly mayor of .Toliet, 111., have 
incorporated the Edmund Allen Film Cor- 
poration. Headquarters of the concern will 
be in this city. 



PRESS ENTERTAINS STARS 

Raymond Hitchcock and Joseph Santley, 
of the "Betty" company. Ernest Truax of 
"Very Good Eddie." Gus Edwards and 
Frederick V. Bowers from the Majestic 
bill and Dick Travers of the Essanay com- 
pany, were entertained by the Chicago 
Press Club last Friday. 

SCHILLER'S HAS SHOOTING 

During a fight which occurred last week 
in the Schiller Cafe, Capt Philip R. Crip- 
pen, an investigator, was shot by Joe 
Bobo, after the latter had knocked down 
Marion Krieg. Bobo was held under a 
$5,000 bond for the grand jury. 



KLICKMAN WITH McKINLEY 

F. Henri Klickmann, the composer-ar- 
ranger, has severed connections with the 
Panl Biese orchestra, in order to devote 
all his time to arranging. He is making 
his headquarters with the McKinley 
Music Co. 



MUSICIAN KILLS WIFE AND SELF 

Juan Costillo, a cornet, player, shot his 
wife, a singer employed at the Subway 
Inn, twice, killing her instantly, and then 
killed himself. The tragedy occurred in 
their rooms, 1154 North La Salle Street, 
May 1. 



LAEMMLE COS. CONCENTRATE 

The Laemmle Film interests in Chicago, 
including "Bluebird Photoplays, Inc." and 
the "Universal Film Exchange" moved into 
the Consumer's building last week. 



SELIG GIVES LION AS GIFT 

Chicago's Chief of Police was presented 
with a baby lion, at the Lincoln Park 
Zoo, last week, by Colonel Win. N. Selig, 
the motion picture producer. 



WALTER De ORIA RETURNS 

Walter De Oria has returned to Chi- 
cago after a long absence. 



ARTHUR HOPKINS HERE 

Arthur Hopkins, producer of "Good 
Gracious Annabelle," was in Chicago last 
week. 



TWENTY LOOP 

HOUSES SHOW 

FILMS 

MORE EXPECTED DURING SUMMER 

More tli a 11 twenty theatres in and 
closely adjoining the Loop, are devoted ex- 
clusively to the presentation of feature 
moving pictures. When it is remembered 
that only fourteen theatres in and near the 
Loop are devoted to legitimate, musical 
comedy, vaudeville and burlesque, and of 
these fourteen, three, in their presentation 
of vaudeville, include moving pictures, the 
ratio of moving pictures to other forms of 
amusement is of added significance. 

A glance at Saturday's programs at the 
various houses reveals every conceivable 
form of moving picture attraction. 

At the Alcazar is "A Royal Romance," 
with Virginia Pearson ; at the Auditorium 
(formerly the home of grand opera) is 
"Real Life in China." The Bandbox has 
"Heroic France, the Allies in Action" : the 
Bijou Dream has "The Easiest Way," with 
Clara Kimball Young : the Boston is show- 
ing "The Moral Courage." with Arthur 
Ashley. At the Casino "The Eternal 
Love," with Douglas Gerard, is showing, 
nt the Castle. is Douglas Fairbanks in "The 
Lamb." The Colonial (formerly a legiti- 
mate theatre) just completed an engage- 
ment of "Joan the Woman" aud "The 
Crisis" is now showing. 

The Gem (formerly a vaudeville house) 
has "The Vagabond Prince." with H. B. 
Warner, the Kozy has "The Voice on the 
Wire" : the La Salle Opera House ( for- 
merely the home of musical comedy and 
soon to revert to that policy) has "Should 
She Obey?" "Enlighten Thy Daughter" 
just finished an engagement there. The 
Orpheum has Lionel Bnrrymore in "The 
Millionaire's Double." The Pastime has 
"The Wild Cat." with Jackie Sanders. 
The Playhouse is showing "The Flashlight 
Girl," with Dorothy Phillips and Wm. 
Stowell. The Rose has "American 
Methods." The Star is playing "The 
Desert Man." with Wm. S. Hart. The 
Studebaker has Douglas Fairbanks in "In 
Again — Out Again." The Tbentorium 
offers "The Birth of Patriotism." The 
U. S. Music Hall has "Vampires," in con- 
junction with burlesque. The World offers 
"Trilby." with Clara Kimball Young. The 
Ziegfeld has "Womanhood." with Alice 
Joyce and Harry Morey. Orchestra Hall, 
previously not identified as a regular the- 
atre, on Monday started what is intended 
for a long run of "The Spirit of '76." 

The local picture boom has led to the 
creation of several new Chicago organiza- 
tions for the distribution of feature films 
and theatrical men of the legitimate amuse- 
ment field are more and more going into 
the picture business. Aaron Jones. Alfred 
Hamburger. Nathan Ascher and Harry 
Ridings, all having much to do with Loop 
theatres, are interested in these projects. 

The Summer season will find more of 
these houses devoted to pictures. George 
M. Cohan's Grand Opera House, which last 
year presented "Civilization." may offer an- 
other film during the coming season. The 
Olympic usually reverts to pictures during 
the dull Summer season. 



BURLESQUE THEATRES CLOSE 

Chicago burlesque theatres are closing 
for the summer. - The Englewood and Gay- 
ety closed Saturday night. The Star & 
Garter will remain open for four weeks. 
A full summer season is contemplated be- 
cause of exceptionally good business. The 
Haymarket will continue its policy of stock 
burlesque all through the summer. The 
Columbia Loop Burlesque Theatre will 
have Harry Hastings Show for the sum- 
mer season, beginning June 15. 



SHOW PRINTERS PERPLEXED 

The uncertainty of the paper market has 
led to grave conditions in the field of 
show-printing. As the market chuuges al- 
most daily, it is practically impossible to 
arrange a list of prices which will hold 
good for any period of time. Managers of 
show troupes are less lavish iu the use of 
the various sheets, also, applying the ex- 
penditures which ordinarily would go to 
paper in other directions. 



SANTLEY CHOOSES SUPPORT 

Wbeu Joseph Santley goes into vaude- 
ville this summer, in' a sketch called "The 
Girl on the Magazine Cover." he will be 
assisted by several of the cast now sup- 
porting him in "Betty." Sam Burbank 
will stroke the keys. Ivy Sawyer, Edna 
Bates. Bunny Wendell, Victoria Mayers 
aud I^iuise Worthington will appear at the 
song and dance end. 



POWERS' PATRONS OBJECT 

Powers' Theatre patrons are objecting to 
carcasses of dead animals in front of an 
adjoining saloon. Formerly the nuisance 
wns not very noticeable, ns Powers was 
closed frequently during ihc early part of 
the season. But with the run of "The 
Boomerang." complaints hegan coming iu. 



WOHLMAN TO QUIT VAUDEVILLE 

A] Wohlman. who used to lie connected 
with Morris Abrahams, now working Chi- 
cago vaudeville, intends to return to the 
music publishing game iu New York. He 
believes the business is again worth while, 
now that "paying acts" is likely to be obvi- 
ated. 



PLUGGED SONGS IN LUNCH 

Pluggers from music publishers found a 
new field of activity last week when John 
R. Thompson permitted them to entertain 
during lunch hour at his Madison Street 
cafeteria. Frank R. Mngini and Dick 
Sachsel were featured. 



GETS OPERA OFFER 

Celia Lovelace, who sang classics on 
the Wilson Avenue bill, last week, is in 
receipt of a letter from Cleofonte Cam- 
panini. director of the Chicago Grand Op- 
era Company, offering her a position for 
next season. 



BILLY KING CO. AT GRAND 

Hilly King & Co. arc at the Grand The- 
atre for an indefinite run, having fol- 
lowed Anita Bush's company, which left 
for Cleveland, last Saturday night, to pre- 
sent two weeks °f repertoire. 

PRIMA DONNA JOINS REVUE 

Dorothy Smith, prima donna," and El- 
mer Haines, who were formerly with the 
"Princess Pat" road show, which dosed at 
Evansville. Ind., are now featured with 
Weiss* Wintergarden Revue. 



"DEW DROP INN" READY 

"The Dew Drop Inn," a musical comedy 
by Percival Knight. John Hazard and A. 
Baldwin Sloane. will be produced for the 
first time at tbe La Salle Opera House 
some time in June. 



GLEASON EXTENDING EFFORTS 

C. T. Gleason evidently likes tbe taste 
of producing he received when he backed 
his daugther in "The Submarine Attack," 
for he is securing local tryouts for other 
acts. 



PEKIN THEATRE CLOSED 

The dance hall which used to be known 
as tbe Pekin Theatre, has been closed by 
the police for violation of city ordinances. 



UNIFORMS ARE PASSES 

The Colonial Theatre has a sign over 
the box-office reading: "Welcome soldiers. 
Yoar. uniforms are yonr passes." 



18 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



May 9, 1917 





PAYMENT SYSTEM FOR 
SINGERS IS AT AN END 



Recently Formed Publisher*' Protective 

Association Promise* Elimination 

of Costly Practice 

On Saturday, May 5, all payments to 
sincere for the introduction of songs in 
vaudeville theatres, cabarets, and all other 
places of amusement ended, and the Music 
Publishers' Protective Association ss the 
new publishers' organization is called, has 
taken charge of the entire song populariza- 
tion end of the music business, as far as 
the singing end is concerned. 

At a meeting held on Friday night, rep- 
resentatives of practically every popular 
music publishing house in the United 
States were present, and the signatures of 
their principals furnished. All have signed 
a contract for a term of two years, by the 
terms of which no singer can be paid in 
any form or manner, either directly or in- 
directly for the introduction of a song in 
his act and any violation of the contract 
is to be followed by drastic steps in the 
nature of fines, which in the discretion of 
the committee which will hear the charges 
can be as high as $5,000. 

The new society has the support of the 
Vaudeville Managers' Association, which 
has promised that should any singer ap- 
pearing in any of its houses attempt to 
introduce a song, published by any person 
outside of the publishers' organization, and 
for which be is receiving pay, that num- 
ber will immediately be eliminated from 
the singer's repertoire and he will not be 
allowed to render it in any of the theatres 
under the jurisdiction of the Vaudeville 
Managers' Association. 

The payment of singers, a practice 
which has been in existence for many 
years, has grown to enormous proportions 
recently, so great in fact that publishers 
state that it has eliminated the greater 
part of the profits of the music business, 
and if the new society has succeeded 
remedying the evil, without cutting into 
the sales of music, a great good has been 
accomplished. 



WOLFE GILBERT'S LARGE LIST 

L. Wolfe Gilbert has recently produced 
the largest list of bit numbers tbat it has 
ever been his good fortune to turn out. A 
notable one is his novelty song "Lily of the 
Valley," which has been taken np by such 
stars as Sophie Tucker, Adele Rowland, 
Marion Weeks, Katherine Miley and a 
host of others. Bis charming Irish song 
"I'm Hearin' from Erin," written in col- 
laboration with Anatol Friedland, is be- 
lieved by many people to be one of the 
finest numbers he has ever written. It is 
certain that it possesses a charm and de- 
lightful sentiment that is seldom to be 
found in the popular songs of modern 
times. It is predicted that "I'm Hearin' 
from Erin" will be one of the longest last- 
ing ballads ever presented to the public. 
"Love is a Wonderful Thing" is another 
Gilbert and Friedland number that con- 
stantly pleases. It is a novelty from every 
standpoint, and is registering a typical 
Gilbert success. 

Wolfe's popularity is constantly on the 
increase and it is little to be wondered at 
when the genuine merit of his recent works 
is considered. He is setting a standard 
for song writers that will be difficult to 
reach. 



GUS EDWARDS AGAIN COMPOSING 

Gus Edwards, who has temporarily re- 
tired from the vaudeville stage, where for 
the past six years he has appeared at the 
head of numerous acts, is once more de- 
voting himself to songwriting. 

During the past few weeks he has writ- 
ten several new numbers, one in particular 
a march song entitled "Laddie Boy," is 
already causing much favorable comment. 



A HOME FOR SONGWRITERS 

Karl G. Nelson, a songwriter of Brem- 
erton, Wash., with the object of promoting 
the art of song and music writing, has 
executed a will and testament by the 
terms of which the Nelson Home for Song- 
writers, will after his death be transferred 
to the writer whom a selected jury pro- 
nounces the most talented and deserving. 

All except professional music publishers 
and their writers can compete for the 
legacy. The contestants must be able to 
write both words and music and at least 
one published number must be submitted. 
From the numbers furnished the jury will 
select the one which in their opinion is 
the best and will make the award. The 
contest closes December 31, 1920, and all 
who wish to compete must have their songs 
written and published six months prior to 
the close of the period. 

Upon the death of Mr. Nelson, the win- 
ner can take possession of the home and 
after his death it is to pass on to the win- 
ner of another like contest. 



HITCHCOCK'S NEW REVUE 

A new musical revue, with the title of 
"Hitchy Koo" is scheduled for production 
at the Cohan and Harris Theatre on June 
4 next. The bright particular star of the 
piece is Raymond Hitchcock, but there is 
no reason to suppose that any hidden 
meaning lies in the revue's title, despite 

this fact. Mr. Hitchcock will be supported 
by a splendid company, some -of the clever 
people of which include Grace La Rue, 
Billy Rock and Francis White, Sordini 
and Leon ErroL The lyrics and music of 
"Hitchy Koo" are by E. Ray Goetz, who, 
with Mr. Hitchcock, is responsible for the 
production which Julian Mitchell will 
stage. After playing a week at Atlantic 
City, "Hitchy Koo" will come direct to 
New York and open as aforesaid. M. 
Witmark & Sons will publish it. 



GILBERT'S PATRIOTIC SONG 

"Let the Flag Fly," by L. Wolfe Gilbert, 
is one of the most meritorious of the 
patriotic songs recently produced. It is 
excellent in every sense of the word and 
will doubtless outlast many of the other 

recent patriotic numbers. Its lyric and 
melody both possess the qualities that ap- 
peal most strongly to the theatre-going 
public at this time. 



HARMS' PROF. MAN BACK IN N. Y. 

Harold Dellon. professional manager for 

the T. B. Harms A Francis Day & Hunter 
Co., is back in New York after a month 
in Chicago. "Jack" Glogau of the firm's 
New York office has been temporarily 
transferred to the Windy City, where the 
popularity of the Harms's songs are en- 
joying a great vogue. 



JEROME'S CLEVER NOVELTY 

William Jerome's clever novelty song 
"If I Catch the Guy Who Wrote Poor 
Butterfly," is being featured by scores of 
vaudeville singers and the public is receiv- 
ing it with marked enthusiasm. The en- 
tire first edition was disposed of almost 
as soon as it was off the presses. 



STERN BUYS WESTERN SONG 

Jos. W. Stern & Co. have purchased the 
western novelty song success "Shim-Me- 
Sha-Wabble." This number has registered 
a strong impression in Chicago and the 
surrounding territory and promises to be 
just as big a hit throughout the rest of the 
United States. 



RUSSAK WITH THE M1LLEGRAM CO. 

"Bob" Russak is now connected with 
the Carl Millegram Pub. Co. in the ca- 
pacity of professional manager. 



NORA BAYES SINGS "JOHNNY" 

Nora Bayes. in her new summer revue 
is featuring the big Forster Music Co. hit 
"Oh, Johnny!" and is making of it her 
feature song. 



A REVIVAL OF SONG CONTESTS 

The popular song "contest," a feature 
of the small time vaudeville houses which 
was discarded a year or more ago has made 
its appearance in the motion picture 
houses and in a new guise promises to 
become a popular attraction. 

The Universal Film Manufacturing Co. 
is responsible for the reappearance of the 
"popular song nights" which motion pic- 
ture exhibitors are invited to introduce in 
their theatres. The Universal is offering 
a film of the leading popular songs and 
while the song is being rendered by a 
singer its story is unfolded on the screen. 
Prizes are to be offered for the singers and 
the co-operation of the music dealers is 
to be obtained, in order that window dis- 
plays of the numbers to be sung on cer- 
tain nights may be made and widespread 
interest aroused. 

The Universal exchanges are co-operat-. 
ing with the exhibitors and the music deal- 
ers and in conjunction with the publishers 
of the songs selected a campaign of pub- 
licity has been inaugurated that will give 
to the ballad and patriotic song a new and 
added appeal for popular favor. 



NEW WRITERS' PATRIOTIC SONG 

Among the score or more patriotic songs 
p bliBhed since the war began, "Answer 
Uncle Sammy's Call," the work of two new 
writers, is attracting attention. 

Kay S. Dover and C. Martin Eddy, Jr., 
of Providence, R. I., are responsible for 
this and several other songs, which will be 
released in the near future. "Alaska," a 
novelty number of the better grade is al- 
ready being featured in many acts. 

Both songs are published by Kay and 
Eddy. 



HARRIS HAS BALLAD HIT 

The Chas. K. Harris office states tbat 
"Thou Shalt Not Steal" (A Heart Away) 
is bringing hundreds of well known singers 
into their office. Among the acts singing 
this popular ballad are : Wills Holt Wake- 
field, Van & Schenck, Dooley and Sales, the 
Primrose Four, Powell and Brennan, the 
Mimic World and many others. 



FEISTS LEADING SELLER 

"Hawaiian Butterfly," the big Leo Feist 
song hit, is leading the entire Feist cata- 
logue in sales and from authentic records 
compiled by the Feist representatives 
throughout the country is the biggest 
seller in a majority of the music centres. 
Rocco Vocco, who secured the song, writes 
that he believes himself well fitted for the 
position of "hit picker." 



POPULAR VON TILZER SONGS 

The Harry Von Tilzer catalogue at pres- 
ent contains many songs which are enjoy- 
ing country-wide popularity. The best are 
"Someone's More Lonesome Than You," 
"On the South Sea Isle," "Just the Kind 
of a Girl" and "Every Day Is Sunday for 
Billy." 



"HONG KONG" WINNING THE EAST 

"Hong Kong," the western song and in- 
strumental success, recently purchased by 
the Leo Feist house, is fast winning favor 
in the East and judging from the number 
of headline acts which are featuring it, 
will soon rival in popularity any of the 
big successes of the Feist catalogue. 



RECORD PHONOGRAPH ROYALTIES 

According' to an estimate furnished by 
a man prominent in the field of mechancial 
reproduction of music, all previous records 
for royalties paid by phonograph and music 
roll cutters on a single composition will 
be broken by that of "Poor Butterfly." 



NEW BERLIN PRODUCTIONS 

Irving Berlin is writing the lyrics and 
music of two productions which will be 
seen early next season. The Selwyns will 
present one and Cohan & Harris the 
other. 



A RECORD FOR STUART BARNES 

Stuart Barnes, has wired Harry Von 
Tilzer, that "The Man Behind the Ham- 
mer and the Plow" has proven a record 
breaking encore winner for him. 

LULB H. SMITH PROMOTED 

Leslie H. Smith, has been promoted to 
the position of publicity director of the 
music house of G. Schirmer, Inc., a post 
made vacant by the transfer of Ernest R. 
Voight to Boston. 

OLMAN LEAVES FOR FRISCO 

Abe Olman, of the Forster house leaves 
New York to-day for San Francisco, 
where he expects to remain for the next 
two months introducing his songs on the 
Pacific Coast. 



SHARPS AND FLATS 

By TEDDY MORSE. 



We can thank the Kaiser for something. 
He got the music publishers together. 



Now tbat everything's nicely arranged 
and organized, "where do we go from here, 

boys?" 



Don't be misled. The herrings that 
bear the name of Bismarck do not come 
from Germany. 



Have you attempted to do yaur little bit 
for your country? Every little bit helps, 
but it will take more than songs. 

Somewhere, somebody has the "Tip- 
perary" song for the U. S. A. The song- 
writers are digging long and deep. 



Joe McCarthy, of the McCarthy-Fischer 
Co., holds forth daily in their busy little 
offices. Very optimistic, still reserved. 



J. H. Remick is very busy with his 
creamery in Detroit. As a side line ha 

dabbles occasionally in publishing mimic. 



Tom Moore (not the poet) has such a 
keen memory for song sellers he can tell 
you, nearly, what your statement should 
be. 

Frank O. French sends in some kiad 
words for "Sharps and Flats." Send in 
some nifties, too, Frank. Yo umust have 
a lot of 'em. 



Harry Breen said something. Why rub 
it in when you've got your man licked? A 
good winner can be good sportsman as well 
as a good loser. 



One music publisher has an efficiency 
man who has not discovered tbat the vamp 
in a song takes 5 seconds to play. What 
good are vamps and second verses anyway? 



Uncle Sam needs no better ad. for his 
recruiting than the dandy fitting suits the 
soldiers wear. That's some tailor Uncle 
has. But what's a 40 stout going to do 
with the waist line? 



In Lancaster the Kresge store has Its 
front painted green. And how Kresge and 
Woolworth love each other. They insist 
upon being side by side in nearly every 
town. That's real business love. 



This guy has failed twice in business. 
Owes everyone he has ever come in con- 
tact with. When he talks to you he looks 
at the top button of your vest, and over 
his desk is the hand-carved, wood-cut motto 
"Be yourself." 



Ham and Eggs in the Mitchell House 
in Morristown, Tenn., consists of 3 (count 
'em, 3) beautiful fresh eggs, with a slab 
of bam an inch thick and 6 inches length- 
ways. Home cured and delicious. The 
price for this wonderful dish was 35 cents ! 



May 9, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



19 







BURLESQUE FANS 

WILL NOT BE 

NEGLECTED 

STOCKS TO FOLLOW SEASON 



The routes laid out for several of the 
Columbia Wheel Shows indicate that, 
weather permitting, there will be no lack 
of opportunities for burlesque fans to en- 
joy their favorite amusement well up 
into the summer. 

Baseball and other outdoor amusements 
will have opposition at the Casino in 
Brooklyn, where "The Bag Dolls in Sag- 
land," "The Bowery Burlesquers," "Hast- 
ings' Big Show" and Mollie Williams Co. 
will entertain in the order named, keep- 
ing the house open until June 16. The 
house staff, no doubt, deeply appreciate 
this fact. 

The Empire, Brooklyn, will also remain 
open until the middle of June, and the 
Empire, Newark, will have the Bowery 
Burlesquers, Billy Sliding Watson and 
the "Maids of America" as past season 
bookings. ' 

HurtiK and Seamon's New York Music 
Hall will remain open for several weeks 
and, at the Columbia, the Hip, Hip, 
Hooray Girls will entertain as long as 
business will warrant. A number of 
Western houses will also remain open for 
business. 

Stock burlesque in profusion, as 
planned, indicates that the regular season 
has not sufficed. At the Olympic, New 
York, and at the Howard, Boston, Strouse 
and Frankly n will have permanent or- 
ganizations. The Kcssler Roof, the Adler 
Theatre and the Grand Street will have 
burlesque shows for the East Slders. 

At Philadelphia the Gayety and the 
Trocadero will endeavor to get summer 
expenses and at Buffalo, Toledo, Boston, 
Chicago, and many other good burlesque 
stands, those principals and chorus girls 
who are anxious to work can keep going 
for some time to come. 

These facts indicate that burlesque, 
which has had a most prosperous season 
for 1916-1917, has struck a gait that will 
easily keep it in the lead of amusements 
as a staple and dependable article. The 
new blood brought in among franchise 
holders tells, and each innovation brings 
burlesque nearer to the mark set by the 
directors in control of the two wheels. 

Next season's announcements promise 
still more improvements, and every fran- 
chise holder is bound to put forth his best 
efforts to keep up the increase in the 
prosperity, which has been the share of 
every progressive producer.' 



REEVES SIGNS DAVE LEWIS 

AI Reeves has signed Dave Lewis, 
formerly of Fields and Lewis, and for 
many years the star comedian with va- 
rious big Western productions for his Co- 
lumbia Wheel show next season. Lewis 
will stage the first part and the book is 
warranted to make them "laugh their 
heads off," Reeves says. The Al ReeveB 
Show closes at the Gayety, Boston, this 
week. 



HOUSE STAFF BENEFITS 

The benefit for Frank Howie, Dave 
Schneider and P. J. O'Hara was a big 
success at Miner's Bronx Theatre last Sun- 
day.- During the afternoon and evening 
twenty big acts appeared to amuse the two 
big houses and were liberally entertained 
themselves behind the scenes, according to 
the hospitable standard set by the popular 
stage manager. The house will close 
Saturday, after the big wrestling tourna- 
ments scheduled for this week have been 
decided. 



BABE POWERS IMPROVED 
Uttca, N.Y., May 2.— Babe Powers, of 
the Behman Show, who was in St. Luke's 
Hospital, suffering from burns received 
during a hotel fire, has left the hospital 
and is with her mother in this city. 

BEN WELCH AT GRAND 

Among the features on the Grand 
Street: Theatre Sunday bill for May 6 
was Ben Welch. 



BURLESQUERS TO 

CONTEST FOR 

FUNDAUTO 

STARS FORMING BOOSTER CLUB 



GALLAGHER PLANS MOTOR TRIP 

At the close of the season at the Empire 
Theatre. Brooklyn, N. T., Dan Gallagher, 
Btage manager of that house, will motor 
with bis family to his farm at Monaton, 
Wis. This will be Gallagher's first visit 
to his farm in five years. 



SAM HOWE AIDS FUND 

Cincinnati, O., May 4. — Manager H. 
H. Hedges, of the Olympic, has sent a 
check for $375 to Treasurer Scribner of 
the Actors' Fund. This amount - was 
raised by Sam Howe's company at the 
Olympic. "Dee" Loretta and Mrs. Howe 
did fine work in interesting Cincinnatians 
in the effort Hedges will close his house 
after the week of May 12. 



VAUDE. GETS ALICE LAZAR 
Alice Lazar, prima donna of the Million 
Dollar Dolls, this season, which closed at 
the Casino, Philadelphia, last Saturday 
night, will Htart a tour of several weeks 
over the Loew Circuit, next Monday, with 
a male partner. 



TERRE HAUTE LIKES BURLESQUE 
Tebbe Haute, Ind., May 5. — According 
to Manager Galligan, of the Grand The- 
atre, burlesque has proved the best paying 
of all attractions and next season, bur- 
lesque shows will play here three nights per 
week. 



GEORGE McCUTNNESS BETTER 

George McGuinneas, treasurer of the 
Gayety, Brooklyn, has recovered from an 

operation for throat trouble, and has 
again resumed the duties of his position. 

MINER TO AID U. S. 

Lieut. H. Clay Miner has been assigned 
to assist Capt, Edwin D. Graff in the 
formation of a Motor Driver's Corps for 
service in the army. 



With the close of the burlesque season 
at hand, the efforts of the female con- 
tingent of the business are all turned 
toward the Actors' Fund Fair, which opens 
Saturday night. All of the prominent 
women, from prima donnas down to chorus 
girls, are doing missionary work for the 
voting contest at the Burlesque Booth, in 
which many contestants will vie for a Lo- 
zier automobile. The car was donated by 
the Lozier Company and is valued at $3,- 
000. 

Many burlesquers who anticipate enter- 
ing the contest are calling upon their 
friends and forming voting clubs, which 
bear their individual names. Each of these 
clubs is composed of from fifty to one 
hundred members. 

Prominent burlesque women who will be 
active in the race to win the automobile 
are Zella Russell, of the "Burlesque Re- 
view"; Marie Donia, sonbrette, "Twentieth 
Century Maids"; Mollie Williams, Flor- 
ence Bennett, "Fred Irwin's Majesties" ; 
Amy Evans. "Broadway Belles"; Etta 
Pillard, "Stone * Pillard Show"; Doris 
Clare, "U. S. Beauties"; Anna Hall, 
"Merry Go Rounders"; June Mills, May 
McCormack, Adelaide Madden, "Baker & 
Kahn's Tempters"; Augusta Lang, Gertie 
Lynch, Babe La Tour, Drena Mack, Flor- 
ence Rotber, Rose Sydell, Norma Brown 
and Florence Mills. 

The managers of a number of shows on 
the Columbia and American Burlesque 
Circuits will be in personal charge of the 
campaigns of their, company representa- 
tives. 



STOCK FOR FLAIG AND BEALL 

Flaig and Beall closed with the "Sept. 
Morning Glories" Co. at the Gayety, Balti- 
more. They go back with the same show 
next season. After a week's rest they 
open at the Gayety, Philadelphia, for a 
summer stock run. 



WEBERS WANT MORE THEATRES 

Joe and Ike Weber, who control the- 
atres in Hudson and Plattsburgh, N. Y., 
are negotiating for several other houses 
which they intend to add to their string 
in the near future. 



WATSON TEAM WINS 

The baseball team of the Watson- Wrothe 
Show, after losing two games in Buffalo, 
X. Y., pulled itself together In Rochester 
and won Its game, played with the boys 
in that city. 



RUTH WESLEY MARRIED 
Word has reached her friends that 
Ruth Wesley left the Max Spiegel show 
to marry Ralph Bradley, of Toledo, O. 



WILL MANAGE HASTINGS SHOW 

Arthur Phillips will manage Harry 
Hastings' "Tango Queens" on the Amer- 
ican Circuit next season. 



WALDRON SIGNS FOUR 

Billy Lynch, Jack Welts, Charles Smith 
and Andy Smith have signed for Wal- 
dron's stock in Boston. 



MURAD TO ENTER VAUDE 

Murad, novelty tramp, has closed with 
the Tourists and will appear in vaudeville 
for the Summer. 



ELECTRICIAN DEAD 

Charles Tull. electrician with Morris 
WainBtock's show for the last six- years, 
died April 24 in Brooklyn, and was buried 
in Montreal, Canada. 



WATSON IN VAUDEVILLE 

Jos. K. Watson is playing the Loew 
time, having closed with the Cherry Blos- 
soms, April 28. 

CAMPBELL SICNS HAYES 

Win. 8. Campbell has signed George F. 
Hayes for next season with the Rose Sy- 
dell Show. 



NOTES OF THE BURLESQUE WORLD 



Thomas A. Brooks will do his blackface 
acts with the "Auto Girls" next season. 



Jean Pollock has signed with Jacobs and 
Jermon for a sonbrette role next season. 



Violet Kelly has- joined the "Twentieth 
Century Maids." 

Lew Reynolds has signed with Wm. B. 
Watson for next season. 



Johnnie Weber will summer at Fair- 
haven, N. J. 

* . 

Leilla Brennan expects to return to bur- 
lesque next season. 



Robert Lansing and Alex Morrissey have 
signed with the Olympic Theatre Stock. 



Pat White will have a racehorse running 
at New Orleans this Summer. •' 



George Brennon will do straights with 
"The Tempters" next season. 



Walter Brown has been secured for 
stock • burlesque at the Colonial, Toledo, 
Ohio. 



Zella Russell and Harry K. Morton will 
do vaudeville over the Loew time. 



Grace Fletcher and Artie Phillips have 
signed with next season's "Tango Queens." 



- Tommy Burns; musical director of the 
Watson-Wrothe show was replaced May 5 
by Bill Bush. 



George P. Murphy will volunteer to act 
as one of Uncle Sam's Aerial Scouts. 



See the routes of the shows for the re- 
mainder of the season in this week's issue. 



Abe' Miers' grandfather died last week. 
He was nearly one hundred years old. 



"The Twentieth Century Maids" by 
their collections among the audiences have 
materially aided the Actors' Fund. 



Sam Granat, treasurer of Miner's Em- 
pire, Brooklyn, will hold a benefit May 24. 



For three years more Fred Binder, the 
Hebrew comedian, will do comedy with 
"The Girls From the Follies." Harry C. 
Van has also been reengaged. 



May Osborne will remain in Boston after 
the Al Reeves show closes and will join 
the Waldron Stock at the Casino. 



Elizabeth Rogers has been signed by Ar- 
thur Pearson as ingenue for next season. 



Howard Sloan, assistant treasurer of 
the Casino, Brooklyn, this season, was ap- 
pointed treasurer May 1 in place of Frank 
Clark. 



Amy Gordon, formerly of the Rose Sy- 
dell Co., has signed for the Grand Street 
stock. 



Morris Wainstock will handle the "Mil- 
itary Maids" alone, next season. He has 
signed George A. Clark, the comedian and 
producer; Chss. Fagan; the Franks, and 
Nellie Greenwood, Boubrette. 



The "Hip Hip Hooray Girls" have 
added their quota to the Actor's Fund gath- 
erings. Mrs. Grods sold tags to an ap- 
preciable amount in the lobby of the 
Gaiety, Washington, recently. 



Rose Sydell will tender a Beefsteak party 
to Kate Pullman, Saturday, at her home 
in Brooklyn. 

John Barry, Mrs. Barry and William 
McClain will motor to their home In Bal- 
timore from Brooklyn, when the "Twen- 
tieth Century Maids" close next week. 



Drew and Campbell's Liberty Girls will 
terminate their season in Baltimore, and 
then go to the Star, Cleveland, to play 
stock during the summer. For next sea- 
son's show over the Columbia Circuit the 
following principals have been engaged: 
Jack Conway, Etta Joerns, Barry Melton, 
Arthur Mayer, James Collins. There will 
be a new production, throughout. 



20 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPE 



May 9, 1917 




HARRY VON TILZER'S 

SENSATIONAL OVERNIGHT HIT' 




Our Ballad Hit That Will Never Dit 



"SOMEONE'S MORE LONESOME THAN YOU 

__ With the Most Wonderf^,5^^J;^^^^^^g.g; 



: Our Big Hawaiian Song Hit That Has Survived Them All 

"ON THE SOUTH SEA ISLE' 

-This Great Song Is Making New Friends Every Day 



Our Terrific Comedy Novelty Song! Hit 



— ------ j * '«»cuy oong: riit 

"JUST THE KINO OF A GIRL 

YOU'D, LIKE TO MAKE YOUR fwiFE 



If You Want a Scream Get This One ■ 

'EVERY DAY IS SUNDAY FOR BILLY 

Better. Sons Than "When "Simrlav n„ V t- ■•',. 

When bunday Comes to Town." Lyric by BERT HANLON 




IN ANY KEY 



HARRY VON TILZER MUSIC PUBLISHING CO 



MEYER COHEN Bns. Mflr. 



May 9, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



21 



VAUDEVILLE REVIEWS 



<Caattenad from Paga •) 



HARLEM OPERA HOUSE PROCTOR'S 125th STREET 



Jolly Johnny Jones and his company 
opened the Bhow and received a warm 
hand at Thursday's matinee, in apprecia- 
tion of their clever feats performed in a 
• wire act of unusual excellence. 

Jack Reddy was in the second spot. He 
sang a number of songs well. His recita- 
tion in the Broadway song was ably 
rendered and his dope impersonation was 
very good, although a trifle long. The song 
following this impersonation could well be 
eliminated, as it seems rather ont of place 
when sung by a man in a dope make-up. 

Brenda Fowler and company made good 
in a suffragette playlet. The piece is well 
acted and seemed to please the Harlemites 
immensely. The politician plays his role 
very convincingly. Miss Fowler is good 
in her role. The others give passable 
support. 

Following an installment of "The Great 
Secret," the audience stood up, while the 
house orchestra played the French national 
anthem. 

Pankey and McCarver will be reviewed 
under New Acts. 

Betty Bond scored big with her songs, 
which told about the different persons liv- 
ing in her apartment house. The "Kid" 
song was sung very well, and the. final 
number brought down the house. If Miss 
Bond would combine a few dainty dancing 
steps with her singing in this number, her 
hit would be even more assured. The turn 
was very pleasing. 

"Laughing Harry" will be reviewed under 
New Acts. 

Morgan & Armstrong scored with their 
skit The girl makes a mistake in appear- 
ing as an eccentric. She is not particularly 
funny, and, even with her makeup on, 
appears to be pretty. If the act could be 
changed around with the girl playing 
straight, the final result would be more 
gratifying to the pair. Both have good 
singing voices and their numbers, excepting 
the one about the dog catcher's daughter, 
put the act over. 

The show was closed by Tom Brown's 
minstrels, seven men who harmonize well 
and depend on saxaphones and brass in- 
struments for their hit. They play well, 
on the whole, with the trombonist par- 
ticularly worthy of praise. The act scored 
heavily. H - "■ 

AUDUBON 

(List Half) 

As far as packing them in was con- 
cerned, the Audubon seemed to be vying 
with Billy Sunday's tabernacle across the 
street on Thursday night. The fact that 
"The Honor System" was being shown at 
this theatre caused a line of standees, five 
deep, as early as 7.45. At 9.30 there was a 
long line of ticket purchasers in front, 
waiting to see the second show. 

Owing to the length of the picture, the 
usual number of vaudeville acts was cur- 
tailed, there being four, instead of six. 
Two of these, Barnes and Hilden, and 
Eddie Kent, will be reviewed under "New 
Acta." 

The vaudeville show was opened by 
Hanley, Lunn and Smith, a trio of har- 
monizers. Their voices blend acceptably 
for the style of numbers rendered. A 
ballad is sung pleasingly by one of the 
three, and the chorus is harmonized par- 
ticularly wen. The act, was a trifle long, 
but the audience seemed to enjoy every 
number, which is the best kind of justi- 
fication for the length of the act. 

The show was closed by Harriet Remple 
and company in Harriet Remple's playlet 
"You." This is a well written offering 
and, if it were not so reminiscent of 
"Kisses," "Overtones" and "Woman Pro- 
poses," might still be working steadily on 
the big time. Its finished acting and at- 
tractive setting do much toward putting it 
over. Harriet Remple's acting should be 
particularly commended, as she shows no 
little ability and puts everything possible 
into her work. The other three in the 
east give excellent support. H. G. 



(Last Half) 

The audience in this house Thursday 
evening seemed to be indisposed, especially 
as far as applauding the work of the actors 
was concerned. It seemed as though the 
cold weather had chilled it and the en- 
deavors of the performers to please proved 
wasted energy. 

The opening turn on the program was 
Chuck Haas, the Rope Spinning Monologist. 
Hass does a number of clever stunts with 
the lariat but his routine of talk does not 
seem to be in line with his work and as a 
result he bad a mighty hard time. 

Dougherty & Lucy, two pretty girls, of- 
fered a piano and singing novelty which is 
reviewed under New Acts. 

The Wilson Franklin Co. presented 
their dramatic-comedy sketch, "My Wife 
Won't Let Me." Even though this turn 
has been seen time and again in the 
neighborhood theatre?, there is enough sub- 
stantial humor and comedy in it to cause 
it to be interesting and amusing. 

The Three Avolos presented their xylo- 
phone specialty in a position where this 
act was greatly needed to add variety to 
the bill. Their opening medley might be 
curtailed a bit, as it seems to be just a 
little too long. 

Gruett, Kramer & Gruett appeared in a 
skit entitled "Red Wagon Comedy." The 
opening dialogue appears to be quite similar 
to the material used in Boatoek's New 
Lion Tamer act. The dialogue between 
the two men is of the same nature as that 
used by Fields and Halliday in the Bostock 
act. The woman's dance and the musical 
specialties in the act are well presented. 

Quigley & Fitzgerald presented a little 
bit of everything which included talk, sing- 
ing, dancing and piano playing. It seems 
apparent that this team is trying to run 
the Rice Bros, a race in an endurance con- 
test. 

Peggy Breman & Bro., in their scenic 
ladder novelty, closed the show. A. D. 



HAMILTON 

(Last Half) 

. At times, a bill can be balanced a 
little better than usual, and such was the 
case with the one in Manager Walter R. 
Meyer's house for the last half. The open- 
ing turn was of such strong quality that 
it carried the second one through, and 
the closing act more than held its own. 

The Norman Bros., aerial artists, 
opened the show. Their routine consists 
of stunts on the rings, strength feats and 
hand balancing stunts. These are all 
neatly executed and possess sufficient 
thrills to arouse the interest of the audi- 
ence in this early spot on the bill. 

JarviB & Harrison, in their comedy 
skit, "Shooting the Chutes," just about 
got over. The act is a fair one for the 
second spot in neighborhood theatres. 
Their work consists of humorous dialogue 
and soft shoe dancing. 

Lottie Williams & Co. offered the com- 
edy sketch, "A Bowery Camille." This 
act, even though seen time and again, is 
of sufficient calibre to prove entertaining. 

Why a real good performer uses a nom de 
plume when playing a neighborhood the- 
atre in a section of the city such as the 
heights cannot be conceived. However, 
Murray Livingston, the protean character 
comedian, elected to use the alias of 
"Henri De Camp." It is conceded that 
Murray is a "champ" at his work, so, 
why should he be ashamed to let persons 
know his identity. His characterizations 
consist of the portrayal of the roles of 
an Italian, a miser and "Happy-go-Lucky 
Drunk." All are well presented. 

Hudson and North offered a unique 
piano and singing act in the next to clos- 
ing spot. The woman offered several 
pleasing character songs, which included 
"Rube," "Kid" and "Irish" numbers. 

The De Pace Opera Co. appeared in a 
vocal and instrumental offering, "A Night 
in Venice," which was composed of bits 
from grand opera. A. U. 



IIBMIgittM^ 



m 



At B. F. Keith's Theatre, Washington, this week 

Selma 
Braatz 




THE RENOWNED 
LADY JUGGLER 

In a New and Novel Offering 

At B. F. Keith's Colonial Theatre, next week, 

May 7 

DIRECTION— MAX HAYES 



* 



IUBM1BWI— 



22 THE NEW YORK CLIPPER May 9, 1917 



OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENT 

To the Profession from the 

MUSIC PUBLISHERS' 

PROTECTIVE ASSOCIATION 



The primary and main object of this association just formed shall be 
to promote and foster clean and free competition among music publishers 
by eradicating the evil custom of paying tribute or gratuities to singers or 
musicians employed in theatres, cabarets and other places to induce diem 
to sing or render music, which custom has worked to the detriment of the 
theatre management and the public through the rendition of music, not be- 
cause of its merits, but because those singing or rendering it received gra- 
tuities in some form for so doing. Such practices have tended to discourage 
and retard the work of music writers, whose labors have not had a free field 
for competition. 

The general objects of the association shall be to maintain high stand- 
ards of commercial honor and integrity among its members; to promote 
and inculcate just and equitable principles of trade and business, and to 
foster and encourage the art of music and song writing. 



For the Artist: 



It will materially increase the standard of songs and provide the artist 
with the best material on the market. . .- , .. v ..\ 

For the Manager: 

It will prevent the continual rendition of inferior numbers which 
eventually affects the patronage of any theatre. 

Music Publishers' Protective Association 



May 9, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



23 



VAUDEVILLE ACTS 

(Continued from page 9) 



r 



CLAUDIA COLEMAN 

Theatre— Eighty-first Street. 
Stylfr — Character comedienne. 
Time — Thirteen minute*. 
Setting — In one. 

This offering of Miss Coleman's is 
original and well constructed, with all of 
her impressions neatly executed and none 
of them overdrawn. 

Upon her appearance she announces 
she will give her impression of various 
types of women wearing peculiar styles of 
hats. Her opening one is that of the 
"gossipy woman." 

This bit is presented in a very capable 
manner and is not in the least overdrawn. 

The second is that of "Mrs. Newlywed" 
going marketing. It might be suggested 
that the routine of talk; here be con- 
densed a bit, as toward the end it grows 
a. little monotonous. Her impression of 
the waitress in a cheap restaurant is the 
best of her numbers, the others which 
follow being amusing but not up to the 
standard set by this one. 

Miss Coleman does a telephone con- 
versation "bit," showing a young woman 
talking over the phone before and after 
marriage. Her rendition leads one to be- 
lieve they are true to life, especially 
from the amount of applause she receives 
at the end of her turn. Her closing num- 
ber is the singing of a song in the char- 
acters of a girl who is training her voice, 
and a cabaret girl. The first impression 
is rather crudely executed, but the latter 
one more than makes up for the de- 
ficiency. 

The act throughout is pleasing, but not 
of sufficient calibre for two-a-day houses. 

A. U. 



BARNES AND HILDEN 

Theatre — Audubon. 
Style— itutioal sketch. 
Time— Eig h teen minutes. 
Setting— Special. 

This is an unusual and whimsical of- 
fering, so foolish and absurd that it is 
fanny. 

In a very pretty exterior . set, repre- 
senting a wood, Red Biding Hood is dis- 
covered. She is lost. Tip in a tree lives 
George Washington. He descends from 
his borne and explains that he is in his 
second childhood. The explanation con- 
tains some very witty epigrams and is 
interspersed with songs. The man pos- 
sesses a rich singing voice. The girl 
sings sweetly. 

The end of the act is not as entertain- 
ing as the first part. The dialogue has 
not quite the same amount of pep, with 
the result that the turn begins to drag 
a trifle. It might be well to eliminate 
some of the talk near the end. 

The song about the Cocoa Cola Tree 
is sung very cleverly. 

At the end of the act, Washington 
lights a lantern and shows Red Riding 
Hood the way out of the woods. 

The act is a real novelty, and with a 
few minutes trimmed off should find 
success on any bill, because the pair 
have talent and possess an entertaining 
vehicle. H. G. 



PANKEY AND McCARVER 

Theatre — Harlem Opera Haute. 

Style — Dialogue and song. 

Time — Fifteen minutes. 

Setting — /» one. 

Fankey and McCarver are a passable 
duo. 

In the first portion of their act, the 
blackface member of the team is dis- 
covered painting the drop, when the 
devil suddenly appears and frightens him 
so much that he flees. 

Shortly afterward he reappears in 
military uniform and sings a patriotic 
number which loses its appeal mainly 
because it was never intended to be sung 
by a comedian. The cane dance that 
followed was an excellent bit of business. 
Some patter about the war between 
the blackface and the straight came next, 
after which a couple of songs closed the 
act. 

The singing and dancing is the strong- 
est part of the turn. The dialogue needs 
revision so that it will be funnier. The 
gag about the quickest way of going to 
the hospital and also the one about the 
Germans' retreat should be eliminated 
unless this act has prior right to them 
over a score of others. H. G. 



EDDIE KENT 

Theatre — Audubon. 

Style— Blackface. 

Time— Seventeen minutes. 

Setting — In one. 

Eddie Kent is a blackface comedian 
without a darkies' accent. He has some 
very original monologue, with the excep- 
tion of the "Jewish submarine" gag and 
"the quickest way to get to a hospital." 
He sings several parodies which are 
clever, and, at the end of his torn, proves 
his versatility by putting over, success- 
fully, a serious patriotic number. 

Kent has an abundance of personality 
and magnetism and seems to find the 
going easy. He is far above the average 
blackface monologiat and has his audience 
laughing from start to finish. H. G. 



DOUGHERTY AND LUCEY 

Theatre— -Proctor's 135th Street. 
Style— Piano and singing. 
Time — Thirteen minutes. 
Setting — One. 

Two rather pretty girls, with person- 
ality and a most pleasing manner, are 
Dougherty & Lucey. Their act consists 
of a number of character songs by Miss 
Dougherty, accompanied on the piano by 
her partner, and the rendition of two 
piano solos by Miss Lucey. 

The first number sung by Miss 
Dougherty is a very pleasing ballad. Her 
second one is entitled, "The Story Book 
Ball." This is bound to please all sorts 
of audiences as it recalls the various 
stories read in Fairy tale books. Her 
succeeding two. numbers are popular 
songs. 

The closing number is a pretty Irish 
song and Miss Dougherty also executes 
a neat and pleasing Irish jig. 

Both solos rendered by Miss Lucey, at 
the piano, are very pleasing. The turn 
should prove an acceptable one for early 
spots in the two-a-day houses. A. TJ. 



VICTOR'S MUSICAL ME- 
LANGE 

Theatre — Harlem Opera Bouse. 
Style — Band and singing. 
Time — Dwentv-four minute*. 
Setting — Special. 

The first scene represents the outside 
of a monastery. A band, off stage, is 
heard playing an accompaniment to a 
chant which some monks sing as they 
enter. Next, a woman appears and sings 
"The Rosary." 

The scene then changes to a full stage, 
and the girl sings a number to the ac- 
companiment of mandolins and guitars. 

She next sings a balmd-in-one wlth" 
the house orchestra playing her accom- 
paniment. This is her best number and 
is rendered 1 exceptionally well. 

The drop then rises, disclosing a special 
full stage exterior set. A band of 
thirteen pieces plays a spirited number, 
marching in various formations as they 
do so. Victor appears and directs them 
in an operatic number, followed by a 
popular medley. 

- The act ends with a big flash, the band 
playing patriotic airs while the girl 
appears with the Flag, and the three 
figures of "The Spirit of '78" make their 
entrance. For an encore the "Star 
Spangled Banner" is played with a good 
deal of fervor. 

The act is not strong enongh to war- 
rant its running twenty-four minutes. 
"The Rosary" could well be eliminated 
and the operatic number made shorter 

H. G. 



VALLEY 



IS VOTED BY 

ADEIE ROWLAND— SOPHIE TUCKER AND MARION WEEKS 

A BIG HIT 

So do countless other great big acts. " Wolfie" Gilbert has proved his right 
to tho Kornelshjp of the Pecan Army. Some of his slaff officers in — Jack 
Inglii, Bert FiUgibbons, Carl McCullough. and Jack Rom. 



Here 



are some more 



hits! 



I'M HEARIN' FROM ERIN 



Gilbert and Friodland's charming Irish ballad. Tis m musical metsago from 
over the 



BROWNSKINGAL 



IT TAKES A 
LONG, TALL 



TO MAKE A PREACHER LAY HIS BIBLE DOWN 



Will E. Skidmoro's uproarious successor to "Pray for the Light, to Go 
Out." More than a kit 1 A BullVeyal 



Just Released! 



SWEET EGYPTIAN ROSE 

Superior to "Pertisn Rose," by th« nim writer.. Edgar All.n Woolf 
»nd Amatol Friedland. 



LOVE A s WONDERFUL THING 



A ktgUy effective stags song. Wolf* Gilbert and Anatol Friadland wrote 
it. It's another kit for Adele Rowland. 



SOMEWHERE i DELAWARE 



A "belter-than-the-rct" state song by Will J. Harris and Harry 1. Robinson. 
It has some doable Version. 



HAWAIIAN SUNSHINE 



The biggest and best of all Hawaiian successes. I— Wolfe Gilbert and 
Carey Morgan gave us this Hawaiian wonder-song. 



POLLYANNA 



The "glad little girl" in song, by Thos. J. Gray and Malrin Franklin. 



JOS. W. STERN & CO. 

L. WOLFE GILBERT, Prof. Mgr. 
1554 Broadway. New York 

San. Francisco — E. S. Florintine, 111 Kearny St. 



P!.a i- rote tho Removal of our Chicago Office to 

COHANS GRAND OPERA HOUSE BLDG., 119 NO CLARK ST. 

MAX J. STONE, in charge 



24 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



May 9, 1917 



OH MY! 

THE WORLD'S 

BIGGEST NOVELTY HIT! 

OH, WHAT A HIT! ! 

HAWAIIAN 
BUTTERFLY 

The Song Rage with 

the infectious, honey-sweet 

unique, croony melody 










A MOTHER'S 

SONG OF PATRIOTISM. 

A REAL THRILL!! 

IF I HAD A SON FOR 






By George A. Little 

Billy Baskette 

and 

<oe Santley 



'#£&' 



A 



<s/ COMEDY MARCH 
SONG THAT PUTS RHYTHM 
IN EVERYBODY'S FEET! 

WHERE 

DO WE GO 

FROM HERE? 

Already accepted as 
America's Tipperary. And 
that's going some! 



Tou CANT 
GO WRONG 

WITH A 

FEIST' 

SONG' 
> ***+< 

GET THAT 
INTO 
YOUR 
HEAD 



EVERY STAR 
IN OLD GLORY 

UNCLE SAM I'D GIVE THEM 
ALL TO YOU 

A Sensational hit In any 

spot — on any bill— anytime 

— anywhere! 

By J. E. Dempsey 

and 
Joseph A. Burke 



Wien OTdarinff i»y "Era? Star in 

Old Glory." 




! 



A HITTE ALLEE 

SAMEE LIKIE 

"HAWAIIAN BUTTERFLY" 

HONG 
KONG 

Another terrific sensational 

novelty that keeps the 

world agoing! 



By Howard Johnson JL|?/\ PeBCT* iH^P 



By Hans Von Holsteln 

and 
Alma M. Sanders 



Percy Wenrich 



.Boston 

JilTREMONTi 



i BROAD) 



lELfH^ML^CH I CACo 
,a»o»H» upe. * 



* PANTA^CISCOj 
■ — T gjtt BLOO-f 



S^LOUllJ 



May 9, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



25 



MONTGOMERY ESTATE $21,000 

David Craig Montgomery, who died re- 
cently in Chicago, left no will, but, ac- 
cording to an application of his sister, 
Mrs. Elizabeth W. Lmvhead, for letters of 
administration, filed last week in the Sur- 
rogate's Court, the comedian left an estate 
of about $21,000. Of this, $10,000 was 
in personal property and $11,000 in real 
estate. After the deduction of all ex- 
penses, his estate will be divided, in equal 
shares, between his two sisters, Mrs. Mary 
Montgomery Jewell, of Omaha, Neb., and 
Mrs. Lawhead, his only surviving heirs. 



TO PASS ON HAYMAN WILL 

Monday morning, June 4, was set as 
the date for the preliminary court hearing 
to look into the objections filed by Mrs. 
Grace A. Seymour against the probate of 
the will of her late uncle, Al. Hayman, 
theatrical manager, who died February 10 
last. Mrs. Seymour charges fraud and 
undue influence and is seeking trial of the 
contest without a hearing before a jury. 
She was excluded from the distribution of 
the residue. 



T. M. A. BENEFIT TONIGHT 

The annual benefit of Brooklyn Lodge 
No. 30, Theatrical Mechanical Associa- 
tion, which will take place to-night at 
the Academy of Music, will have the best 
program this lodge has ever offered : 
Among those who have volunteered are 
Frederick Warde, who will make an ad- 
dress; Doyle and Dixon, dancers; Nella 
Brown, and Claire M. Gillespie, singers. 



HOLYOKE CASINO TO OPEN 

lIni.vdKK, Mass., May 7. — The Mountain 
Park Casino, operated by the Holyoke 
Street Railway Co., will have its opening 
on June 10. Six acts of vaudeville are to 
play - a full week in the Casino. The 
park will be managed and booked by 
Fred Sarr, of the Eastern Vaudeville Man- 
agers' Association. 



MISS WOODRUFF OPERATED ON 

St. Path,, Minn., May 5. — Eleanor 
Woodruff, leading woman for Otis Skin- 
ner in "Mister Antonio," playing here this 
week, underwent an operation for mas- 
toiditis in a hospital here and came 
through safely. It is expected she will 
be able to resume her role within a few 
weeks. 



DANIELS IS GENEROUS 

Mt. Vebnon, N, X., May 8. — Frank 
Daniels, who owns a country home here 
which stands In the centre of an eighty- 
acre estate, has turned over the land to 
the citizens of White Plains to be used 
by them during war times, for the raising 
of potatoes and other foodstuffs. 



WOMEN'S RELIEF BALL DELAYED 

The Stage Women's War Relief has 
postponed its ball, which was to have 
been held at the Waldorf Astoria Monday, 
until some time early in the Fall. This 
was done in order not to conflict with the 
plans of the Actors' Fund. 



FRANCES GOODRICH MARRIES 

Frances Goodrich, who plays the lead- 
ing ingenue role of Cora Falkener with 
Ruth Chatterton in "Come Out of the 
Kitchen," was married last week to 
Robert Ames, who has the role of Charles 
Daingerfield; in the same comedy. 



SPECK LEAVES METROPOLITAN 

Jules Speck, for nine seasons stage man- 
ager of the French and Italian operas at 
the Metropolitan Opera House, has re- 
signed and will shortly return to his 
home in France. 



DALEY HOME FOR SUMMER 

Faix RrvER, Mass., May 4. — Jack 
Daley has returned home after a season 
with Cohan & Harris western company. 
Playing "Hit the Trail Holliday." 



DUNCAN WRITING NEW PLAY 

William Cary Duncan is completing a 
new play which will be seen in New York 
in September. He is collaborator with 
Rida Johnson Young on the book and 
lyrics of "His Little Widows." 




mm : ; 



}>.., 



M 



Don't Keep 
That Corn 

"P VERY drug store th : at 
•*— * you pass has Blue-jay 
waiting for you. 

Stop and get it, and it 
means the end of any corn. 

Pass it by, and the corn 
will stay. You know that 
from experience. 

Blue-jay does more than 
end a corn. It proves that 
corns are needless. 

Apply lt,and the corn pain stops. 
Leave it oo two days, and the 
whole corn disappears. Only 
extra stubborn corns need a 

second application. 

Prove that once, and corn 
troubles end forever. You will 
never again permit them. 

To millions of people— users ot 
Blue-Jay— corns are a pest of the 
past. 

Do what they did— try It. See 
what o Blue-jay does. Learn why 

so many millions are now used 

each year. 

Lay aside the old-time methods. 
Use this modern way tonight. 
You will wish that you had start- 
ed years ago. 



BAUER & BLACK 
Chicago and New York 

Makers of Surgical Dreaming*, etc. 

15c and 2Sc at Drossut* 
Abo Blue-jay Bunion Plasters 

■■■i:iica ■:t'Wr.i..Mi»ta<mi;ni^'er 



1 

m 



K::~ 



Blu 



e=jay 



Stops Pain — Ends Corns 

Instantly Quickly 



l : . 1*4*7." .m-MtA.Sf.WE^J ■•JTOETB 




CHARLES 




and 



IRENE 



SHAW 

NOW IN VAUDEVILLE 

DIRECTION BILLY ATWELL 



A Card of Appreciation 

To those who appeared at my benefit 
in the New York Elks Lodge Rooms, 
evening of April 28. Artists: Billy 
Hart's Moving Pictures; The Martinis; 
Percy Plunkett; Selbini and wife; 
Harry Thomson; Henrietta Purvis; 
Faust and Faust; Gilbert Gerard; Hen- 
rietta Byron; John Myers; Master Sid- 
ney, Barruch Tyers and Sister Harriet; 
John Bernard Dyllyn; The Cornalla 
Family, and Colton White, Announcer. 
Again with best wishes and thanks to 
the artists who so generously tendered 
their services, I am, yours truly, 
LUKE WILSON. 



ACTS 



PLAYS. SKETCHES WRITTEN 

Terms for a stamp. 

E. L. < AMBLE. Playwright. 
East LK n-pocJ. O. 



WANTED 

FOR THE 

AL. G. FIELD 

GREATER MINSTRELS 

Sober. Reliable 

MINSTREL PEOPLE 

Including Comedians, Vocalists, Dancers, Musicians 

SOLO SAXOPHONIST WHO CAN PUT ON BIG SAXO- 
PHONE NUMBER. 

ALSO FOUR SAXOPHONISTS TO WORK IN BIG ACT. 
Must double. 

Cornet for band to double saxophone in act. 
First cornet for band and orchestra. 
First class flute and piccolo. 
Also clarinet, band and orchestra. 
2d bass to double tuba or alto. 
Four chorus singers to double band. 

10 boys over sixteen years of age, singers and dancers, 
to double in military drill. 

Orchestra white face. Company furnishes all costumes. 
Enclose no photos or press matter to be returned. 



FOR SALE 

Scenery of all descriptions for theatres, vaudeville acts, 
parks, etc.; Drops; Borders; Wings. 

One magnificent first part setting. 

Chair covers. 

One railroad train effect; can be used on any stage. 

Electrical effects, lamps, lenses and all kinds of stage 
properties. Write us stating your needs. 



AL. G. FIELD 



50 Broad St. 



AX LIBERTY 



TI 



Columbus, Ohio 



JOHNNIE WEBER 

Principal Comedian 

Address 12S West 49th Street, New York 



li 



Or 



n 



The Kentucky Girl 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



ANDREW COPELAND 

America's Premier Colored Singing Comedian 
Address 121 W. 136th St., New York City IN VAUDEVILLE 



SONG WRITERS:;: ': ■ — -. 

PER FOR ME.RS ROB.. H 8RENNFN 1433 Broadway. N.Y. 



26 THE NEW YORK CLIPPER May 9, 1917 



N. V. A. ry-i T t rp N. V. A. 

FIVE KITAMURAS 

EQUILIBRISTS 



Direction — Pat Casey Agency 

1ST. V. A. N. V. A. 



THE AUDIENCE WON'T APPLAUD— THEY'LL STAND UP AND CHEER WHEN YOU SING 

.»-&* fc "Answe r Uncle Samm y's Call" — — 

IF YOU'RE LOOKING FOR A HIGH-CLASS SONG, DON'T LEAVE "ALASKA" OUT IN THE COLD 



"ALASKA" 



Lyric by ••/%■/% W K A 7 7 Mu " c by 

C. MARTIN EDDY. Jr. A^. I j /-% |^J l^k. A"% KAY S. DOVER 



EVERYTHING READY — PROFESSIONAL COPIES TO PROFESSIONALS ONLY —DANCE ORCHESTRATIONS READY. 

KAY and EDDY— "The House of New Ideas" Dunn-Rodenberg Bldg.— Providence, R. I. 



N. V. A. N. V. A. 

BILLY ELMORE 

ABBOTT a- WHITE 

"THE BOYS FROM SONGL AND" 

BOOKED SOLID 

Direction — Claude & Gordon Bostock 

N.V.A. N.V.A. 



Jugglers, Attention! 



Thou! who hw u«, and those who «e u» in the future, please I«»t« 
our idea» and burin— in this net alone. Thanking T ou hi advance. 

— Fern, Richilieu & Fern 



IVfarR Levy Presents 

STANLEY and BURNS 

Two Jolly Bachelors Booked Solid 



ROBERTS CLINTON 

WILLIAMS & TAYLOR 

Singing, Dancing and Talking 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



A HOLIDAY IN DIXIELAND 



lO- - • PEOPLE lO 

WITH 



Witt MASTIN and Virale RICHARDS 

In a Cyclonic Bant of Mirth, Malodr and Dndu 

Direction HARRY A. SHEA 



ORIGINAL 

COLONIAL TRIO 

■ Featuring 

MAUD KELLY MARTIN KEARY KATHRDf HULLING 

Harpiat Tenor 

DIRECTION JACK SHEA 



May 9, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



27 



CIJj9J» 




In order to avoid mistakes ud to Insure Ik* p r uaupt dallvery of the letters •dnfttead 
id this list, • POSTAL CARD must be Mot rsmssa MM u. to forward Tour Utter. It must 
t» »i«nad with your full iu» and th. addraaa to which th. lattor la to be eeaat, and tha 
I in a of bmlmi followod by tha itndtr should ba mantissa ad, 

Pleas* mea tksa tha date (or Btimbar) of th* CUPPER ta which th* Uttar* a*ait for 



GENTLEMEN 



Atsins, Richard 
Adams. Geo. I. 

Baaeut, Boaen 

Barrett, Edw. 

Barlnw Comedy 

Circus 
Blckford. Chas. A. 
Bertrand, Frank 
Bwkhantt, jack 
BUllnu, Jss. i. 
Broob, tico. V. 
dark. Don M. 
Ccmoollr, Boy 
Carltoa. Billy 
Castle. Harry B. 



AUtborpe, Lily 
Arorn. Haxloe 
Browneli, Mabel 
Brooks, Eunice 
Brvhm, Kathrro 
Belmont, Boater 
Benson. Harloo i. 
Crario. Mar- 
suerite 



O If ton. Bay D. 

Caites Bra*. 

Chlpman, Win. E. 
Coot*. Ernest 
Darll. Jack 
Derrre, Ed. 
Demurs], J. p. 
Daries, Harry 
Elwyn, Lorn 
(anner. Will C. 
Glasgow, Jss. k 

VI?. 
nut. Jack a 
Hcsra, Gene 
Huntley. J. H. 



Gllmore. Edith 

If. 
Clifford. Kathleen 
De Vore, Irene 
Elliott. Dick 
Estrrbrook. Jessie 
Elaine. Nell 
Franjlols, Oeor- 

da B. 
Flike. Kate W. 



Holland, Moot 
Hudson. Ed. 
Uabn a Owens 

Krndell. H M. 

Kabl. f. w. 
Klein, Oscar 
King, Tbos. J. 
King. Frank 
Lester. H. A. 
Le Heine, Fred 
Lawrence, Daly k 

Lawrence 
Lewis. Lew 
Lang, llarry M. 
Lawrence, Boot. E 



Lewis. Gene 
Learitt. A. 
HcSnane, Jack 
Martins. Frank 
Harks, Joe 
Miller, E. A. 
Morrison, J. 
Mlekle. Ed H. 
Martin. Grant A. 
McNeills * Beyos 
Mala. Ed N. 
Milton. Bout. II 
Newhart, Cnaa. 

E. 
CDay, Km. 



LADIES 



Fields. Betty 
Fairfax. Vlninls 
Falls. Mrs. Billy 

A. 
Grey. Madeline 
Gaylord, Alice 
Jewel. Vltlan 
Jenkins. Chic 
Leoette. Feral 
LOTcrldie. Millie 



La Salle. Babe 
Mack. Blllle 
M In ton. Marguer- 
ite 

Martin. Beatrice 
Milton, Maud 
Marshall, Louise 
Milton. Root. 
MrCormsrsu May 
Morley, Edna 



Penney, G. Al 

Buaells, The 
Beld. Hal 
Bowler, Ed 
Boblnson, Jack 
Bice, Frank 
Rlcbards. Paul A. 
Boberls. H. P. 
Sharp, Lew 
Squires, Bay 
Smith. Geo. A. 
Bosun. Bynm 
Tanner. John J. 
Tnny Trio 
Terrls. Chas. 



Marya. May 
Murphy, Mrs. J. 

L. 
Martlne. Mrs. K. 
Ponce. Ethel 
Ranahin. Miss 

M. 
Robertson. Helen 
Benard. Mrs. 

WD. 



Vice. Fred 
Williams, Harold 
Wolr/belm. Eugene 
Welsh. Less J. 
West. J. W. 
Wslsh, Tbos. H. 
Willing. Blchard 

L. 
Wolfe k Lee 

Wilton. Joe 
West. Geo. 
Welton c Us 
Ward. Geo. 

Yates. Boh 



Richardson. Mrs. 
Reyes, Rita 
Rarmons. Stella 
Boselle. Queen 
BoVe, Mrs. Bom 

A. 
Raymond. Mona 
Sutton. Lola A. 
Wolf, Katbertn 

B. 



PAYNE TO STAGE B ARR1E PLAYS 

B. Idea Payne has been engaged to 
stage tbe three Barrie plays which will 
be produced at the Empire Theatre next 
Monday. 



SOMERSET VAUGHN HERE 

Somerset Vaughn, the English play- 
wright, arrived in New York last week 
from England via Australia and Honolulu. 



DEATHS OF THE WEEK 



CARROLL. JOHNSON, the well known 
minstrel performer, died May 1 at St. Luke's 
Hospital, this city, from a complication of 
diseases. The deceased was born Decem- 
ber 16. 1851, at Carllnsrford. Ireland, and came 
to this country when a young: boy. Ha en- 
tered the profession In 1868 and a few years 
later. With George W. Powers formed the 
Johnson A Powers' San Francisco Min- 
strels. Later Johnson was one of J. H. 
Haverly'a Minstrel Stars and in 185E with 
Frank McNlah and Bob Slavln he formed 
the McNlsh. Johnson & Slavln Minstrels. 
Still later Johnson and George Thatcher 
headed their own company. Vaudeville next 
claimed Johnson and he continued a vaude- 
ville headllner until about five years ago 
when he retired. He made his home In 
Bllxabetb, N. J. Hts wife survives him. 
The deceased was a member of New York 
Lodge No. 1 B. P. O. Elks, where services 
were held last Thursday evening:. The fol- 
lowing morning services were held In the 
Church of the Immaculate Conception, 
Elizabeth, N. J., and Interment was made 
In that city. 

JAMES POOTON, the well known ad- 
vance agent, died April 30 at Liberty, N. Y., 
after a long Illness. Jim Pooton waa one 
of the most popular men in the theatrical 
.business and was a welcome visitor to 
every theatre and newspaper office from 
coast to coast. He was born September 21, 
1870. in Brooklyn. N. Y.. the son of the late 
James Pooton, the editor and first presi- 
dent of the New York Press Club. Like his 
father. Jim became a newspaper man ana 
waB reporter and editor of various news- 
papers In this city.. He entered the thea- 
trical business as press agent of "Floro- 
dora." Later he Joined the Charles Froh- 
man forces and was advance agent of John 
Drew and other stars and playB. He was 
taken ill with tuberculosis In September, 
1916, and had since resided In Tucson, Alia., 
and Liberty, N. Y. Last fall he did a few 
weeks' advance work for Arnold Daly. He 
was unmarried. Funeral services were held 
last Thursday at the Campbell Undertaking 
Establishment. Interment will be In Cypress 
Hills Cemetery. ' 

COL. CHARLES W. SEE LEY, the vet- 
eran circus man, died April 28, at his home 
In Elmlra, N. Y., aged 78 years. Col. Seeley 
was born at Horaeheads, N. Y., and waa 
an expert tumbler when nine years old. In 
1866. as a member of the John Murray 
Shows, he made his first appearance under 
a tent. Later he did clowning with the 
Adam Forepaugh and the Sells Brothers 
shows. Subsequently he left the ring and 
became adjuster for the Buffalo Bill Wild 
West and went to Europe In the same 
capacity with the Barnum & Bailey Bhow. 
Of late years he waa active In booking 
-outdoor attractions. Col. - Seeley was a 
member of the Masonic Order, the Mecca 
Temple and Mystic Shrine and was also 
an Elk. 

JIM BRADY, of the vaudeville team of 
Jim and Kitty Brady, died In Chicago re- 
cently and the remains were taken to Pitts- 



burgh, his home town, for burial In St 
Mary's Cemetery. The team had been In 
the show business for the past twenty years, 
and were playing In Oskaloosa, la.. In 
March, when Mr. Brady ruptured himself. 
The engagement waa closed and he went 
to Chicago to undergo an operation. He 
had been In the hospital only nine days 
and was getting along finely when he sud- 
denly collapsed and died. Ho leaves, be- 
sides his wife Kitty Brady, one child. Mary, 
who Is also in tbe profession. 

WILLARD SIMMS, well known to musical 
comedy and vaudeville, died last Thursday 
morning at his home In Chicago. He had 
been III with pneumonia for ten days. 
Slmms was about fifty years of age. He 
had appeared In vaudeville over the two- 
a-day circuit for fourteen years In the same 
skit, "Fllnder's Furnished Flat," and dur- 
ing his career in musical comedy was seen 
In many roles on Broadway. His last ap- 
pearance with a production was with Irene 
Franklin In "Hands Up." He left a fortune 
of more than 1600.000. 

HENRI STUART, whose real name waa 
Henry DeWItt Goodwin, an old-time min- 
strel, died In Loa Angeles recently. As 
Master Henri, he danced with Dick Sands 
In the tour of Morris, Brockway and Tay- 
lor's Minstrels In 1861 and 1862. In 1863, 
he assumed the name of Henri Stuart, 
when he toured with Arlington, Kelley, 
Leon and Donnikers minstrels of Chicago. 
He danced for many years with minstrel 
organisations, his last engagement being 

with "Billy" Emerson's minstrels. 

DAN MACK died May 1 at the house of 
his father In Buffalo, N. Y., after a long 
Illness. He started as book boy with the 
"Happy Hooligan" Co. In 1900. For the 
past five years he has been with Sim Will- 
iams as agent, and made many friends In 
the business. 



JANE SYLVESTER, In real life Mrs. 
Jennie Stewart, mother of May Stewart, 
the Shakesperean actress, died recently In 
Des Moines. la., from a stroke of paralysis. 
Her last illness continued for one month. 
and she was convalescing when the relapse 
came. 



knox GAVIN, actor, died last Friday at 
Clifton, N. J., at the age of fifty-two years. 
Twenty years ago he was teammate of 
John Kelly, the Irish comedian. Later he 
appeared In many of the plays of the Shu- 
berts, Zlegfeld and Cohan & Harris. 

HARRY HOLMES, theatrical manager 
and producer on the Coast, died April 21 at 
Bellingham, Wash. He managed a theatre 
at Bellingham several years ago and was 
under contract to manage the new Pan- 
tages Theatre at Tacoma. 

FELIX VIGNOT, once a circus clown, 
died last Sunday night in Bellevue Hospital - 
from heart failure. Vlgnot was sixty-five 
years old. He was born In Canada and 
had lived In the United States fifteen ye 



Circle 2171 

New York Theatrical 
Costume Co. 

Formerly 135 W. 45th St. 

HAS REMOVED TO 

101 West 51st St., N.Y. 

We will be pleased to see all our old 
friends, and invite new ones to call. 



Wanted for Next Season 

Chores Ladles for 
THE BEEF* TRUST 

Also Small Girls for tbe 

UNITED STATES BEAUTIES 

Also want good feature acta, and people lo all 
Una. of Burlesqoe. Address BOLT WATSOH, 
Orphstun Theatre, Peterson, M, J. 



LEON A. BEREZNIAK 

Lawyer ta the Profession 
Baa. to notify his many friends that he has 
moeed his offices in Chicago from 105 Weat Mon- 
roe Street to the First National Bank Building. 

70 West Monroe Street, Suite 1I47-4S-4B, wham 
he has orach enlarged facilities and Will be 
pleased to see or bear from bis friends. 

MAX ROGERS AGENCY 

Now at 1562 Broadway 

WANTS NOVELTY ACTS FOR 

CABARET 




Telephone 4239 Greeley 

FIRST CLASS HALL 
FOR'REHEARSALS 

436 West 38th Street 

(Near 9th Ave > 
Suitable for rehearsing productions of all 
kinds. Stafe, piano, etc. Terms Raaeonahle. 



Natalia and Ferrari's 

RUSSIAN CONSERVATORY 
OF DANCING 

Regular course for beginners and teachers. 
Auditorium Theatre BMg. 
' Studio 73. Chicago 



WHITE RAT TRANSFER CO., Inc. 

EXriESS us BAGGAGE. Dafsaf. Itsrse. it In sat*. 
147 Wost 37th Stre.t, New York 

Manicuring. Hair Dressing-. Scalp Treatment. Bham- 

Doalot. Toilet Preparations. Bondolr NoreiUes. 

•la siAaaK' shop 

MSt Broadway. Boom 701 (» a. m. to a p. m.) 
Kpeclal attention (Iran members of 
1'hone Bryant 23BT Theatrical Profsssstflss 

Telephone, 4344 Bryant 

TRUNKS REPAIRED fK? 

3M Weat 41st St, Comer 8th Ave. 



Formerly with 
Taylor Trunk Works 



Quick service 

Returned in 24 hours 



Reliable: Prolesslonal 
FRANCIS X. HENNESSY 

Irish Piper— Scotch Finer— Irish Stap Dan- 
cer— Scotch mot Dancer— Ykrllnljt (Ha- 
skrisn] — Teacher — May rafts. Assets aaas> 
tats address: 322 Sens 4 Ass., It. Ysrt. ■ 
T19T. 




MAGICi 



I ACTS FOR SALE CHEAP. We 
Buy, Sell or Bictianie used 
Apparatna. Professional Cata- 
log 10c. Pocket Trick included FREE. Write or 
Call. Hornman Mario Co., Bta. 1. 470 8th At.. N. Y. 

YOUR SUMMER RETREAT 

BEAUTIFUL Restricted Bnscalow Building 
sites by the ass: eearnursj, eonrenlent location: prfrsls 
bathing beach; trait trees, forest. UoaUni, UUat: low 
prices; easy terms; title guaranteed; perttralars Basiled. 
GREAT KILLS HKACB CORPORATION. 31 Put Bos, N. T. 
Cort. 420S. 



GEO. PflLIAU'C THBATHE. IV WAV 

rV* l/UnAN O * 43 St. Ers. 8:!S. 

Res. wwiinn W TeL Bryant S82. 

Hal. Hamlltoo-Edward Ellis present 

St. COHAS'B -GXEAT AMERICAN COStEDT 



GEO. 



CET-RICH-QUICK 
WALLINCFORD 



With HALE BAaQXTOH 



EDWARD SrT.T.TS. 



LIBERTY 



W. 41!ri St. Eros. 8.15. Mats. 

Wed. and Saturday 2. IS. 
John Mason. Irene Feattlck, Helen Ware, Katluld* 
Cottrelly. Helsa Lowell. Richard Bennett, Larw 
Fields, Willis P. Swsataam. In 

"BOSOM FRIENDS" 

By FRANK stAsTSEL. 

NEW M0R0SC0 THEATRE 

«*t» ST.. Jaat W. of B-sray. Paces. Bey eat MS. 

__ ■»•«• "-IS. Mats. Wed. and Bat. 111. 
OUrar Koroaoo's Orast* stastoal Pan. srlta Qtria. 

CANARY COTTAGE 

Monday, Kay 16— THE BBAT moras from Harris 
Theatre* 



GAIETY 



THEATRE, R'wsy A 48ta 
St. Bras, at 8.20. Mats. 
Wed. A Sat. at 2.20. 
winuruXL SaHTH and JOHH L. GOLDEN 
Present th. season's success 

TURNT0THE RIGHT 



REPUBLIC 



THEATRE. W. 42nd Bt. 

Ermines at e.13. Matinees 
Wadnesdsy A Saturday 2.1s. 
Messrs. sbnbsrt present 
a dramatisation of George da Maurice's DOTel 

"PETER IBBETSON 

with John Barrymore, Constano Collier, Lamm 
Hope Crews, Lionel Barrymore. 



KNICKfliBOCHfR SSSS 

««w 4k ftlu.tr !5S..*^ Ml, 

GEORGE ARLISS 



wis 
Mats. 
Sat. I.**. 

Maaassn 



C. 



In all rreataat snooess 



9> 



Cohan & Harris stffl. 

■*<•>- A.20. Uata. Wad. A (Ut at s m 

OOHAW AlS HsJtlUl preaaat 

THE WILLOW TREE 

A FANTASY OS/ JtriS. 

By Baarlm. and Hantaan Shades. 



»• 



»» 



B. T. KEITH'S 

PALACE 

Broadway * 4Tth St. 

Mat. Dally at 2 P. M. 

28, SO and 75c. 

Iriri Nlsht 

2S-aO-To-»l-tl.r3a 



EDDIE TOT * THE 7 
POTS, EMMA CASUS 
DOYLE * DIXON. IDA 
BROOKS' HUNT sV AL- 
FRED OX MAjTBT A CO., 
ODIVA. LAURIE A 

BBOnOsT, ttliUT 
BHOB., AsCETA. 



WatiltnBt.. PDod. Bryant 4* 
Errs, at 8.20. Mats. Wed. A Sit. 
2.C0. Ollter Moroeco'a its. I 
S ea so n*. On. Substantial siwisaa 



CORT 

lauibluf ancc«au. 

UPSTAIRS -DOWN 

BY FREDERIC 4% FArersY HATTOIf 



EXCELLENT FOOD 



GOOD SERVICE 



T . l . sJi o.a Bryssat 42W 

Cbc St. Regie Restaurant 

AND BAKERY 

165 W. 47th Strsst 

Opposite Palace, 47th St. Side 

Bet. 6th Ave. A Broadway NEW YORK 

HERE'S WHERE HEADL1NERS MEET 

Telephone 1631 Melrose. 

li. P. Knight Scenic Studios 

140th St. and Walton At... New York 

Three blocks south of Mott Avenue Subway 

Station. 

SCENERY OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 

Always on Hand. 

Scenery Rented for Try Out Acts. 



THEATRES AND PRODUCTIONS, 
VAUDEVILLE ACTS EQUIPPED 

New and Second Hand Scenery ta Stock 

MURRAY HILL SCENIC STUDIO 

Columbia Ths.tr. Bids;., 47th A Bswaaawsry 
Tel. Bryant 1243 Tern Creamer, Mgr. 



28 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



May 9, 1917 



JEAN ADAIR 



IN 



"Maggie Taylor— Waitress" 

Direction Uwii & Gordon 



FRANK STANLEY 



IN 



"Where's The Finish" 



Representative 
BERT GOLDBERG 



DIRECT FROM 
THE NUT FACTORY 




Direction HARRY WEBER 



FLYING MISSILE EXPERTS 
AND BOOMERANG THROWERS 

Booked Solid 

U. B. O.— BIG TIME 



Stuart Barnes 



Direction MS. E. PLUNKETT 



EDNA WINSTON TRIO 

NOW PLAYING U. B. O. TIME 



DIRECTION CHARLES BORNHAUPT 



EMMA STEPHENS 

BOOKED SOLID DIRECTION HARRY FITZGERALD 



DAINTY MARIE 

VENUS OF THE AIR 

Wishes to Be Known In Future Under Her On Name 

(DAINTY) MARIE MEEKER 

DIRECTION PAT CASEY 



LEW SHARP RUBE GOLDIE 

5 MERRY YOUNGSTERS 

Fun— Fast and Furious 

HARRY GOODMAN JOHN GREEN MACK COLEMAN 

DIRECTION LEE MUCKENFUSS 



The Yaltos 



Dainty Dancing Duo 

DIRECTION GENE HUGHES. INC. AND JO. PAIGE SMITH 



BUD WALKER 

Managers take notice: He's always on Broadway 

He looks like AL Jolson DIRECTION— JACK McGANN 



EDDIE VINE 



In "A Study in Songs 



99 



Direction PAUL ALLEN 



RUTH and BOB 

THE CHRISTIES 

The Musical Act With a Punch 



JACK FLYNN, REPRESENTATIVE 



NOLAN and NOLAN 

JESTING JUGGLERS 

Direction NORMAN JEFFRIES 



SUPREME NEW OPERATIC OFFERING 

M" E DOREE'S CELEBRITIES 



Direction STOKER A BIERBAUER 



CAMILLE PERSONI 

THE "BUTTERFLY GIRL" OF VAUDEVILLE 



HARRY PEASE 



"The American Entertainer" 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



BOOKED SOLID— MY HUSTLING AGENT NAT SOB EL 



ED. F. REYNARD Presents 

UTIP 

Bl ANC A 

In a flsrlss of Dramatic 



MI, IF BIANCA Presents 
ED. F. 

REYNARD 

Th» VaatrOaqnml C illsn. 

In -BEFORE THE COURT." 



MAX HART PRESENTS 
THE 



VAL THE ERNIE 

ST ANTONS 



In "OH, BRAZIL" 



Mar 7, COLONIAL 



JACK 



NELLIE 



ORBEN and DIXIE 

In Southern Songs and Dances 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



TANEAN BROS. 



Week April 3s, Lowes, Baltimore; May 7, S, », Modjeska, Augusta, Ga.; 
May 10, 11. 12, G. O. H„ Atlanta, Ga.: May 14. IS, If, Bijou, Birmingham. 
Ala.; May 17, 15, U, Lyceum, Memphis, Tenn.; Week 21, McVIckers, 
Chicago; Week 28, Orpheum, Detroit; Week June «, Miles, Cleveland. 



May 9, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



29 



THEATRE CLUB ELECTS OFFICERS 

The New York Theatre Club held its 
annual election of officers at the Hotel 
Astor last Wednesday. The following were 
elected: President, Mrs. Belle de Rivera; 
first vice-president, Mrs. Gordon Ritchie; 
second vice-president, Mrs. Louis Ralston ; 
third vice-president, Mrs. Austin N. 
Palmer : fourth vice-president, Mrs. Daniel 
P. Duffle : recording secretary, Mrs. Dudley 
Van Holland ; treasurer, Mrs. G. Wash- 
bourne Smith, and corresponding secretary, 
Mrs. Frances H. Abrahall. 



COURT BANS GERMAN SEX PLAY 

Supreme Court Justice Erlanger ren- 
dered a decision last week barring the pro- 
duction of Frank WedeWnd's play. "The 
Awakening of Spring,' one matinee of 
which was recently given in New York 
under the auspices of the Medical Review 
of Reviews. In giving his opinion. Justice 
Erlanger said in part that "the production 
would offend public decency, bad no place 
on the stage of a public theatre and did 
infinitely more barm than good." 



MRS. TEARLE WANTS ALIMONY 

Josephine Park Tearle, former wife of 
Conway Tearle, is seeking to collect back 
alimony from him amounting to $100. The 
actor was last week served with an order 
to show cause in the Supreme Court why 
an attachment should not be issued against 
him for contempt of court for failure to 

pay it 

BUSER SUES FOR DIVORCE 

Cincinnati, May 7. — Melville A. Buser, 
actor, is suing bis wife, Mrs. Bessie W. 
Buser, for divorce, alleging she became 
intoxicated in rooming bouses and hotels in 
New York. Chicago and other cities. The 
couple were members of Fannie Ward's 
company "The Fighting Parson" and "The 
Misleading Lady." 



TORPEY SUCCEEDS WOOD 

Frank J. Torpey has succeeded Cyrus 
Wood as stage manager of "The Knife," 
now playing at the New Bijou Theatre. 
The change was made at the solicitation 
of Wood, who plays Second-Sight Jimmy, 
and desires to devote bis entire attention 

to the role. 

TULLEY LEAVES FOR RANCH 

Richard Walton Tally, with his wife 
and infant daughter, left last week for 
California. He will spend the Summer 
On his ranch at Sierro Madre, and will re- 
turn to New York in Angnst to prepare 
productions for next season. 



COPEAU REPLACES BONHEUR 

The Board of Directors of the Theatre 
Francais announced last week that Lucien 
Bonheur bad terminated bis connection 
with that institution and that Jacques 
Copeau has been appointed as bis suc- 
cessor. — — — — 

MUSICIAN WEDS SHOW GIRL 

Hy. Clifton, bead of the musical depart- 
ment of the Klaw & Erlanger offices, and 
Hazel Lewis, a member of "The Century 
Girl" company, were married last week in 
the Sacred Heart Church. 



MARGOT GEORGES FOR BALLET 

Margot Georges, who was one of the 
principal skaters at the Hippodrome, has 
been engaged for the Summer Ice Skat- 
ing Ballet at Thomas Healy's Golden 

Glades. 

CHANGE NAME OF "FROLIC" 
The title of the "Ziegfeld Midnight 
Frolic," given on the New Amsterdam The- 
atre roof, has been changed to the "Zieg- 
feld Eleven-Thirty p. M- Frolic." 



MARGARET DOW'S MOTHER DEAD 

Mrs. Susan Crinion, mother of Mar- 
garet Dow, died April 30, aged 75 years. 
Besides Miss Dow, two grandchildren sur- 
vive. Interment was at Celeron. X. Y. 



SAM HARRIS AT SPRINGS 

White Sulphur Springs. W. Va., May 
7. — Mr. and Mrs. Sam H. Harris. Grace 
Nolan. Irving Berlin and Fred Niblo are 
resting at the Greenbier, here. 



MRS. ERROL AT FRENCH LICK 
Mrs. Leon Errol has gone to French Lick 
Springs for two weeks. 




LOTTIE 
WILLIAMS 



In 



BOWERY 

CAMILLE 

MERCEDES 

ALVIN and 

ANDY 

WILLIAMS 

Bits from Songland 

Direction NORMAN JEFFERIES 



THE 

NAGYFYS 



Pyrotechnical Novelty 

Direction All. T. Wilton 



PAUL DURAND 

Present* 

Xlie 

Van Sisters 

Dainty vocal and instrumental 
artists, featuring Chriitie Van, the 
greatest living girl cometiit. 



SLAYMAN ALI 

■: Producer of :: 

ORIENTAL NOVELTIES 

754 1th At*. Naw York 

Phone Bryant 8950 



DIKE 



LEWIS 



THOMAS & CRADDOCK 



Singing, Talking and Comedy 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



JAS. & 



STANFORD 



ROBINSON and McKISSICK 



DIRECTION MAX OBENDORF 



THERESA L. MARTIN 

In Vaudeville 

N. V. A. 



AGENTS, LOOK US OVER 

TIIVIIVIOIMS and EDDY 

BACK IN TOWN 

Refined Singing, Violin and Piano 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



Ray Lynch A BIG SURPRISE Arthur Clay 

FOUR AMERICAN BEAUTIES 

Fred Slater Direction of wenonah m tenney Uw p^ 



THE NOVELTY FOUR 

Slim, Elmer, Cy and Heinie send a Hello to their friends. 

DIRECTION MARK LEVY 



Bubla pearl 

A (Sariien »pat an any Bill 

Souring Carat Sfrrnrt Blrrrttan zRaxk Crag 



Mabel Harper 

The Funbeam of Vaudeville ELSIE WEBER at the Piano 



JOHNNY 

ies 

tram tfca South. 



CORA 

DIRECTION SAM SHANNON 



ROBERTS, STUART and ROBERTS 

FROLICS OF 1916-17 

BOOKED SOLID— i-OEW CIRCUIT REP. SAM BAERWITZ 



JACK 



MATT 



CAMPBELL & MEEKER 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



EUGENE EMMET T & CO. 

In the Rural Musical Comedy, "TOWN HALL FOLLIES" 

RAYMOND FRAZ1ER. PrmctoeJ 



E MI L IE S I STE RS 



DIRECTION 
LEW GOLDEX 



ETHEL MAE BARKER 

"KUBELDC IN PETTICOATS" 

LINTON and WATSON 

Comedy Tallrfn* Act, Entitled 

K She Auto Know" 



30 



THE HEVf YORK CLIPPER 



May 9, 1917 



Featuring Hawaiian String Quartet 

BIRLINGTON FOUR 



In "Hokcmvlllc" 

PERSONAL DIRECTION ARTHUR KLEIN 



„-2&& 




Aseutod by FLOR D'ALIZA 
Presenting Tneir Wonderful Roosters 
Ch»«. Bornhaapt Keeps Them Crowing. 



JACK M. SYDNEY 

Versatile Entertainer Singing and Comedy 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



BILLY 



BETTY 



KIMBALL and KENNETH 

Novelty Banjo Entertainers. Originators of Hawaiian Sted Banjo, 

Playing Loew Time Direction Mark Levy 



DOROTHY 



FABER m TAYLOR 



U. B. O. 



In "GOING NORTH" 



W. V. M. A. 



ABSLAM SHARIFF 

THE LATEST MUSICAL REVIEWS 

20— PEOPLE— 20 

Send in open time per route. Direction MARK MONROE, Putnam Bid*., N. Y. 



Vivian 



Lawrence. Daly and Lawrence 

COMEDY— SINGING AND DANCING ACT 
Of VAUDEVILLE ADDRESS— CLIPPER 



ANNA MAE COONEY 

AND 

DELLA COONEY 



ALWAYS WORKING 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



SHUBERT TRIO. 

C. H. HASKELL. Mgr.— IDA BUTLER— SAM CILLETTI HARMONY SINGING 

'T THE FIVE MARTELLS "UBSS" 



WEEH AWK EN, P. 0„ N. J. 



ED 

AND 

IRENE 



LOWRY -**"*%»- 

■■■■■■a ^aanv » » eaej va* eas» Rv Trtuuv /^oav 



BY TOMMY CRAY 



AGFNTS, LOOK US OVER 



BOSAN and GRANGER 



Sons of Ham 



SINGING. DANCING. MUSIC 
AND COMEDY, DM VAUDEVILLE 



PAUL, LE VAN & DOBBS 



ACROBATIC COMEDIANS IN VAUDEVILLE 



THREE LADIES 



ONE MAN 



DANCING VIOLINIST 
IN VAUDEVILLE 



Beatrice McKenzie 

in a Singing Novelty Assisted by RAYE DUNN 

Direction FRANK EVANS 



EDDIE MARGIE BIIXY 

DeLite.Stewart, Hardy 



20th Century Trio in Song, Dance and Patter 



Rap. Tom Jones 



WILLIAM WAHLE 

Manager Olympic Theatre 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 



ADELAIDE CONLEY 

REFINED SINGING 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



EDDIE 



DOLLY 



DOLLY & LEWIIM 



IN A 

School, Fool and a Flirt 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



ELEANOR FISHER 



■i 



IN VAUDEVILLE 




BILLY NEWELL i ELSA MOST 



With MENLO MOORE 



W. V. M. A. 



U. B. O. 



SAM LAURA 

IS & WALKER 

A Laaaon in Dancing — Norman Jafferiaa 

— _ _ _^ ~Z!!L E .a~--7 — ,^ In 'THE ASTRONOMER'S 
M Z\ I?T I A M ^ D R E AM OF MARS." 

1 * M I"^k. 1% M I i*^m 1 ^ Wj Sped*! Scenery. Everything OrixtaeL 



ALL GIRLS 



Darling Saxophone Four 



DIRECTION MARK LEVY 



RUSSELL, GREENE and JONES 

Singing — Acrobatic — Dancing 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



NOVELTY AERIAUSTS 



Direction MR. BORNHAUPT 



IN 'THE JUGGLER'S DREAM" 

BOOKED SOLID. SAM BA£RWIT2,.REP. 



May 9, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



31 



U. B. O. 

atw TORS U1TI. 

Feleoe — Eva Tangnay — Louise Dresser — Dooley 
and Sales — Arnant Bra*. — Gerard and Clark — Her- 
man and Shirley — Bvax-Burrows Fontaine A Co. 

Colonial— Loney Haskell— Sylvester A Vance— 
Carlisle A Homer— Welch's Minstrels— Three Bote 
— Bclna Braata — Allele Bowlasd — Dooley A Sales. 

Boyal— Mrs. Geoe Dogbes— Bert Fltxgibbon— 
Tbomaa A Hall — Hafford A Chain— Henry * 
Adelaide. 

Alhambre— Dunbar's Darkies— Frank Crumlt — 
Violet Dale— Tiro Cultona — "Nursery Lend" — 
Hooper A Marborv — Gene Green. 

Btverside — Booney 4 Bent — Frank Cromlt — 
Stan Stanley Trio — Maleta Bonconl— Maaon Keeler 
Co.— Eddie Fey. 

BROOKLYN. 

Baahwiek — Blta Gocia — Scotch lads A Lassies 
— Florence Moore A Bro. — Bert Melrose — Toota 
Paka— AmtU — Hickcy Bros. — Chinese Duo— Bell 
A Frieda — Pete A l'ala — Jaa. J. Corbett. 

Orpheom— Kelly A Wilder— Harris A Manlon — 
Four NightonB — "Bride Shop" — Sophie Tucker A 
Co. — lllguon — Laurie A Bronaon. 
ATT.AMTA, O A. 

Lyrio — California Boy* Band — Bert Johnson Co. 
—The Headllners— Smith A Austin. 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Keith's — Nelson Waring — Four ■ Earls— Bemple 
Sisters — Olga MUbfca — John B. Hymer — Kelly A 
Galvin — Daisy Jean — Ellaaheth Murray — The Brads. 
BUFFALO, N. T. 

Shea's— Wsiter Brewer — Pllcer A Douglas — 
Yvette — Cooper A Rlcardo— Sallle Fisher— The De- 
Bara. 

BAXTIKOKE, kfD. 

Maryland— Toe Sharrocki— Bock A White— Jim- 
my Local A Co.— Lewis A White— Mme. Sorce A 
Co. - 

BIRNrSGHAK, ALA. 

Lyrio (First Half) — Bison City Foot— The Head- 
liners. (Last Half)— Derkln's Girls— Smith A 
Austin — Bert Johnson A Co. 

anrcDTXATi, ohio. 

Keith's — Raymond A O'Connor — 8. Miller Kent 
A Co. — Hale A Peterson — Chat. Abearn Co. — The 
Larnede — Jaa. Leonard A Co. — Spencer A Williams 
— Neher A Cappel — Allan A Howard. 
COLUMBUS, OHIO. 
Keith's— Mario A Daffy — The Dattous — Samaroff 
A Sonla. 

DAYTON, OHIO. 
Keith's— Oscar Lorraine — Montgomery A Perry 
— Australian Crelehrons— Moon A Morrle — Foot 
Boyaea — Daisy Leon — Robinson's Elephants. 
DETKOIT, 1CCH. 
Temple— "Forest jflre" — Novelty Clintons — Joe 
Towle — Klmherly A Arnold — Francla A Boss — 
Amea A Wlnthrop— Georgia Earl A Co. 
ERIE, PA. 
Colonial— WW Oakland— Marie Lo— The Vivians 
— Fern A Davis— ingles A Beading — Jack George. 
OBAND RAPIDS, MICH. 
Empress — Poniello Sisters — The DeMacoe — Great 
Howard — "Bobeviile" — The Cappelina — Kltner. 
Hawkaley A McKay— Marie Stoddard. 
HAMILTON, CAB. 
Temple — Willie Solar— Milton A DeLong Slaters 
— Lohae A Sterling — Fred Sogers. 

XMBIASAPOUS, nro. 
Grand— Maryland Singers — Gaxclnettl Bros. — 

Bennett A Richard* — Win. Slsto — Billy Beeves A 

Co. — Nip A Tuck— Rockwell A Wood. 
JACKSONVILLE, FLA. 
Keith's (First Half)— Clifford A Wills. (Last 
Half)— Girl with Thousand Eyes— Mr. A Mrs. 

Jlmmle Barry. 

LOUISVILLE, XX. 
Keith's — The Volunteers — David Sapetateln — 
Clark A Verdi — Chas. Aldrich— McCarthy A Faye 
— McClellan A Carson. 

PITTSBURGH, PA. 

Davis— Nat Wills— Bene Parker— Bob Albright 
— Sara Padden A Co.— R. A G. Dooley — Wm. 
Bbba A Co. — Kanazawa Japs — Five Nelsons. 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Keith's — Primrose Four — Bob Dalley A Co. — 
Corner Store— Grace DeMar — Bernard A Janis — 
Dopree A Dnpree — "Edge of World" — Ward A 
Faye. 

SAVANNAH, QA. 

Savannah (First Half) — Mr. A Mrs. Jlmmle 
Barry — Girl with Thousand Eyes. (Last Half) — 
Clifford A Willis. 

TOLEDO. OHIO. 

Keith's— Brltt Wood— Stelnaell Bros Francis 

A Kennedy — Terado Bros. — Avellng A Lloyd- 
Bert Baker A Co.— The Mclntyres— Whipple 
Huston A Co. — Oorln A Newell. 

TORONTO, CAN. 

Shea's— McKay A Ardlne— Jack LaVler— Ben 
Welch — Lambert & Ball — Dooley A Nelson — 
(lark's Hawaiiana — Margaret Voting — Allan Dlne- 
hart A Co. 

WASHINGTON, S. C. 

Keith's— Ward A Van— The Brighton*— Marcks 
lions— -J. W. Keane A Co. — Jaa. Ssntley A Co. — 
Craig Campbell— "Honor Thy Children" — Williams 
A Wolfoa. 

YOUNGSTOWN, OHIO. 

Keith's — DeFonvst A Kcarn — Page. Hack A 
Mack — Goelett, Harris A Morey— Raymond A 
Caverly-^Joe. E. Bernard A Co. — Gertrude Hoff- 



ORPHEUM CIRCUIT 

CHICAGO, TT.T. 

Majestic — Morgan Dancers — Avon Comedy Four 
—Ryan A Lee— Bert Leslie A Co.— Lambert A 
Fredericks — Kerr A Berko — Black A White — Witt 

A Winter. 

DENVER, COLO. 

Orpleam — Countess . Nardlal — Cross A Josephine 
—Palfrey, Hail A Brown— Billy Klnkald— Chas. 
Cranewin A Co.— Hlnachal HIndler— Yedlln, Watts 
A Til suss 



WMUDEVIllB BILLS 

For Next W»&& 



DEB M0INX8, LA. 
Orphetua— Lew Dockatader— Nordstrom A Pink- 
ham— Caltea Bros.— Three Jahna— Wheeler A 
Dolan— Mack A Earle— Misses Campbell. 
KANSAS CITY, MO. 
Orphenm— Nellie Nichols— Natalie Alt— H. A A. 
Seymour — "In the Trenches'* — Banns A Anton — 
Toby Claude A Co. — George Kelly A Co. 
LOB ANGELES, c at 
Orpheus — Edwin Arden A Co.— "Garden of 
Aloha" — "The Recital" — Marmein Slaters— Bert 
Kenny— Artie Mehllnger — McWattera A Tyson — 
Els A French. 

LINCOLN, NZB. 
Orphetun — "The Cure" — Whiting A Bart — Clara 
Morton— Ethel Hopkins— Halligan A Bykes— Knl- 
lervo Bros. — Fannie A Al Astalre. 
TniimurTw j^-j, 

Fontainn Psiat — Howard A Fields — "Girl from 

Milwaukee" — Bayno'i Dogs — Frisco* — The 
Kramers. 

MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 

Orphemn — Beatrice Hertord — "A Double Ex- 
posure" — Thos. Swift A Co. — Better Bros. — 
Harnko Oukl. 

MILWAUKEE, WIS. 

Orphemn — Melntyre A Heath — G. Edw. Bandbox 
Bevne — Herbert Clifton— Llhooa Tl— Clalrmont 
Bros. 



Orpheom— Lydla Barry — Bert Leslie A Co. — 
Estelle Wentworth — Tempest A Sunshine — Moore, 
Gardner A Boae — Alaska Duo — Biggs A Wltchle. 
PORTLAND, ORE. 

Orpheom — Rnth St. Denis — Marlon Harris— King 
A King — Lewis A Norton — Helen Plngree A Co.— 
Blssett A Scott— Josie O'lleen. 
BT. LOUIS, MO. 

Orphenm— Mercedes — Barry GIrerd A Co. — Blta 
Nario Orchestra — Cojlin A Parka Trio— Cnmmlngs 
A Shelley— Walsh A Bentley. 

bt. PAUL, jennr. 

Orphenm — Dorothy Jardon — Tower A Dunll— 
Carson Bros. — Wm. A Marg. Catty— Hayes A 
Nlves — Flanagan A Edwards. 

BT. LOTUS, XO. 

Forest Park Highlands — Grons A King Co. — 
Bowman Bros. — Dore A Verdon — Bertie Ford — 
Boeder A Dean. 

BAN rRANCISCO, CAL, 

Pantagea — Le Roy Talma A Bosco— "Our 
Family" — "Tate's Motoring" — Ben Deely A Co. — 
Gould A Lewis— Belle Story— Rosalind Coghland 
A Co. — Johnston A Hart. 

SACRAMENTO, STOCKTON AND FRESNO. 

Orphenm — Cecil Cunningham — The Berrens — 
Chang Hwa Four — Ethel McDonougb — Hermlne 
Shonee A Co.— Galdo Bandeoger. 
SEATTLE, WASH. 

Orphenm — Bay Cox — Boyle A Brown — Dorothy 
Shoemaker A Co. — De Loen A Daviee — Frank A 
Toby — Leach Wallin Trio— Dorothy Brenner. 
SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH. 

Orphesxa — The Casinos — Kosetts — Seven Honey 
Boys — La Gracloaa— Edwin Arden A Co. — Ashley 
A isaeass* — Togan A Genera. 

LOEW CIRCUIT 
NEW YORK CITY. 

American (First Half) — Davis A Walker — Bar- 
ton A Hill — Long Tack Sam A Co. — Marcella 
Johnson A Co. — Janet Allyn A Co.— Elks Trio. 
(Last Half) — Sylophonos— Harry A Vera Morriaey 
—Two Brtants — Schwarts A Clifford — Van A Car- 
rie Avery — Howard A Sadler — John B. Gordon A 
Co. — Three Vagrants — Leo A May Jackson. 

Boulevard (First Half) — Burns A Lynn — Win- 
ston Roedle A DeMar — Hilton A Laser— Three 
Syncope ters. (Last Half)— Ferdinand — Kenny A 
LaFrence — Montrose A Alien — Chas. Deland A Co. 
— Morrla A Allen. 

Avenue B (First Half) — Lamont A Wright — 
Baker A Rogers— Lew Welch A Co. — Society 
Dancing Girls. (Last Half) — Jack A Fores — 
Plsani A Bingham — Josephine Davis — "Ward 22." 

Greeley Square (First Half) — Ferdinand — Ken- 
ney A La France — Holden A Herron — Bert 
Howard — Ballard Trio — Brown,- Harris A Brows 
— Bolan A Nolan. (Last Half) — Delight, Stewart 
A Harvey — Helen Vincent — Barton A Hill— "Case 
for Sherlock" — Bush A Shapiro. 

Dalanoey Street (First Half)— Williams A Till — 
Schwarts A Clifford— "The Alibi"— Three Va- 
grants — Leo A May Jackson. (Last Half) — 
Stewart A 'Keeley— Miller A Mitchell— Nolan A 
Nolan — Flotti — Brown. Harris A Brown— Joe 
Remington A Co.— All American Four. 

Lincoln Square (First Half) — Jack Our!— De- 
light. Stewart A Harvey— Helen Vincent— Jos. 
Remington A Co. — Jack Wilson Trio— Bcch Bros. 
(Last Half) — Thomas A Henderson — Bille Rutland 
— Foater A Ferguson — "Inalde Job" — Blny Data 
Trio— Chio A Ohio. 

National (First Half) — DeFra— Belle Rutland— 
Spiegel A Jones— "Case for Sherlock"— Billy Dale 
A CO. (Last Half) — Williams A Till— Berline 
Dno— The Triangle — Jim McWUllama. 

Orpheom (First Half)— Orben A Dixie— Howard 
A Sadler — Rayno A Hoyt — Payne A Nesblt— Sam 
Liebert A Co.— Two Brlants. (Last Half)— Van 
Camps — Satty Seeley — Spiegel A Jones — Janet 
Allyn A Co.— Hilton A Laiar— Jim McWUllama. 

Seventh Avenue (First Half)— Sally Belly — 

John B- Gordon A Co Jim McWUllama — Colo A 

Chio. (Last Half) — Three Syncopaten — Darts A 
Walker — Ballard Trio— Boca Bros. 

BROOKLYN, N. T. 
BIJon (First Half) — Tan Camps— Stewart A 
KeUey— Piotti — "Inside Job" — Lewis, Belmont A 
Lewis— Lelanda. (Last Half) — P*"-*ig Demons 



Jenks A Allen — Rich Olrl-Poor Girl — George Me- 
Faddeo — Fern, Rlcnellne A Fern. 

DeKalb (First Halt)— Tbomaa A Henderson— 

Berlins Duo— "The Fixer" — Jenks A Alien Fern. 

Rlcnellne A Fern. (Last Half) — Orben A Dixie 

Rayno A Hoyt — Payne A Nesblt — "The Alibi" 

Lewis Belmont A Lewis — Sabbott A Wright, 

Warwick (First Half)— Zlta— Plsano A Bing- 
ham— Norelty Four. (Last Half)— The Lowrys— 
Bsker A Rogers— Society Dancing Girls. 

Fulton (First Half)— May belle Beat— The Tri- 
angle — All American Four. (Last Half) — DeFra 
Marcella Johnson A Co.— "The Fixer"— Jack Wil- 
son Trio— Burns A Lynn. 

Palaoa (First Half)— The Lowrys— Coonay Sla- 
ters— J. K. Kmmett A Co.— Wheeler A Mickey- 
Three Roaellaa. (Last Half )— La Mont A Wright 
—Mario A Trevotte— Sam Liebert A Co.— Novelty 
Foot — Jolly Johnny Jones. 

BALTIMORE, MD. 

Hippodrome— Bufford A Rose— Geeaan A 

Spencer — O'Neill A Gallagher — Soldier'a Witt 

B. C. Faulkner— Victor Morley A Co. 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Orpheom (First Halt ) — Cornelia A Adeie — Base- 
ball Four — Barnes A Robinson — Hans Robert A 
Co. — Julian Rose — Borslni Troupe. (Last Ham- 
Two Brownies — Duval A Simons — Roatlno A 
Skelley — "Man in the Dark" — Bob Carlln. 

St. Jamas (First Half)— Stanley A Burns — Loo 
A Grace Harvey— "The Punch"— Andrew Kelly— 
"Days of Long Ago." (Last Half)— Forrest A 
Church — "Boarding School Girts" — Julian Rose — 
Borslni Troupe. 

FALL RIVER, MASS. 

Bijou. (First Half)— Two Brownies— Roatino A 
Skelley— Bob Carlln— Lottie Mayer's Girls. (Last 
Half)— Cornelia A Adele— Barnes A Robinson — 
Baseball Foot — Lottie Mayer's Glrla. 
NEWARK, V. J. 

Xajeatio (First Hill)— Sylphuo— Miller A 
Mitchell — Montrose A Allen — Van A Carrie Avery 
— Buch A Shapiro — Three Eacardoa. (Last Half) 
— Helena A Kmllloa — Walton A Delherg — Bert 
Howard — Winston Roselle A Co. 

PROVIDENCE, R. I. 

Emery (First Half-)— Grace A Ernie Forrest- 
Harmon A Malcolm— "Boarding School Glrla" — 
Hodler, Stein A Phillips — Blgoletto Bros. (Last 
Half) — Stanley A Barns— Loo A Grace Harvey — 
"The Punch" — Andrew Kelly — Blgoletto Bros. 
TORONTO, CAN. 

Yonge Street— Blcknel A fllbney — Garbray Bras. 

—Herbert A Dennis — Carry A Graham "Passing 

Show." 

POU CIRCUIT 

BRIDGEPORT, CONN. 
Foil (First Half)— Sylvia Loyal— Welaer A 
Reiser— American Boys A Girls— Eddie A Lew 
MiUer— lahlkawa Japs. (Last Half) — Ruth Crx- 
Hs— Levitt A Lockwood— Four American Beauties 
— "America First." 

HARTFORD, CONN. 

Palaoa (First Half)— Falk A Stenven— Larry 

A Sally Clifford — Burke A Burke— Tbomaa P. 

Dunn— Odlva A Seals. (Laat Ha]/) — Cecil* A 

. Francals— Senna A Weber— Kane A Herman— 

.International Girl. 

' Poll (First Half)— Da Antonlos— Rives A Harri- 
son—Dave Roth— Seven Bracks. (Last Half) — 
Verce A Verce — Dave Manley — Phlna A Picks. 
WATESBTJKY, CONN, 
Poll (First Half)— Hill A Sylviannl— Hale 
White— Storm A Marsdon— Levitt A Lockwood— 
"America First." (Last Half)— Six Musical 
Spillers— Weiaer A Reiser— Archer A Belford— 
Dave Roth— Odlva A flails 

WORCESTER, MASS. 
Poll (First Half)— CecHe A Francals— Dave 
Manley — "Danny" — Kane A Herman. (Laat 
Halt) — Falk A Stevens— Rives A Harrison — Storm 
A Marsdon — Eddie A Lew Miller — Seven Bracks. 
Plaxa (First Half) — Verce A Verce— Senna A 
Weber^ — Archer A Belfoni — Jack Dnnamore. (Laat 
Half)— Larry A Sally Clifford. 

NEW HAVEN, CONN. 
Bijou (First Half) — Arnold A Fiorens — Both 
Curtis — Phlna A Picks — Four American Beauties 
— International Glrla. (last Half) — Jack Dons- 
more — Burke A Burke — Elsie White — lahlkawa 
Japs. 

BCBA2TTOH. PA. 

Poll (First Half)— Three Alex— Valentine Vox- 
Howard A White — Helder A Packer. (Last 
Half) — Leddy A Leddy — Dorman A Deglen — "The 
Politician"— Bob Yoscc— "For Pity Bake." 

36 PARODIES 25 CENTS 

gun Fire Kind on late seats. 
■AST TgsVEs, 8190 areas at 



Money Bad 



t. I. 



.PATRIOTIC DROP 

A beauty 18x30 In dye used once, cost 190.00. 
Will sell for $35.00. BAILEY STUDIOS, Troy, 
N. T. 

White Dull Calf 

Two weeks old. something yon have h ardly ever 
seen, for sale to circus people. Address HKKaTAN 
NETJaEBATJEE, Whits etUls, Pa. 






A YEAR'S COMEDY SUPPLY 

In FUNrrrBONB Nos. l, 2, a. a and S. 
Ekjtlre lot for SLzS; or for 85c. will send I 
FDNNTBONB No. 6, con taining sure-fire 1 
acta of wrtrj description. Funny bona Pub- | 
Hailing Co., 10M Third Avesmav New TeT 
(Pop*. P.). 



TALENT 

Is not the only rscjulnrmssst. You've got 
to havs up-to-date Comedy materiel to 
make good. Gat wise and aeatd for 

THE NEW No. 8 

McNsALLY'S BULLETIN 

Everything New, Bright and Original 

PRICE Sl.OO 

sWfslira BULLETIN He. S eontalns 
17 8CEEAJaTNO MONOLOGUES. Tor He- 
brew. Irish, Black and White Face. Dutch. 
Tramp, Wop, Female and stump Speech. 

10 SESAT ACTS FOR TWO MALES. Bach 
act an applause winner. 

| SOARING ACTS FOR MALE AND FE- 
MALE. They'll make good on any blU. 

a STJBX-FIRZ PARODIES. On all of 
Broadway's latest Bong Hits. 

A C0NXDT SKETCH. Entitled "ANXIOUS 
TO GET RICH." It's the FUNNIEST 
SKETCH In Vaudeville. 

stoHALLTS KERRY MTN8TEEL9. Con- 
sisting Of III corking FIBST PARTS, and- 
lxur with a scrssming Finale. "NOT 

GUILTY." 
A TABLOID COMEDY AND BURLESOUE, 
entitled "IT'S YOUR WIFB"; also hun- 
dreds of Crosa-Tlre Gags and Jokes and 
additional Comedy Surprises. Remember 
the price of McNALLY'S BULLETIN No. 
S U only ONE DOLLAR par copy, Witt 
money-pack guarantee. 

WM. ■cNALLY, 81 E. 125th k., Maw Tark 



GEORGETTE 

DRESDEN DOLL OF THE CABARETS 

Congraas Now, Chicago 

Lillian Bernard 

KANSAS CITY FAVORITE 
Congress Cafe, Chicago, Indaf. 

ACTORS— All lines. 

PIANISTS— (Man) capable playing small parti. 
BOSS CANVASSMAN, property mas. 
VAUDEVILLE ACTS lor Concert. 

VAN DYKE &. EATON 

Toot Theatre Dewey, Oklaw 




PHILADELPHIA 

via New Jersey Central 

EVERY HOUR ON THE HOUR 

From Libsarty St., lA.EbUP.ll. 

and at Midnight with swassfwsa 

It MINUTES OF THE HOUR 

From W. ad St, 

YOUR WATCH IS YOUR TIME TABLE 

Consult P. W. HEROY, E> P., Agwot 

Um BROADWAY, NEW YORK 



Bal's Dreadnaught 




u 



AT SUBMARINE PRICES 
PM* I IS inch 



WILLIAM B AL COMPANY 

145W.4Stl>St_N. Y. 4W.Z2si9clt.T. 
NEW CIRCULAR HOW READY 



22 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



May 9, 1917 



JIMMIE DOLLY 

AND 
Exclusive Material 



HERBERT 



LEW 



PIANO AND SONG COMEDY 

BOOKED SOLID 



Five Borsinis 

.Novel Comedy Revolving Globe Spectacle 
BIG TIME ACT IN VAUDEVILLE 



A BREEZE FROM THE PLAINS 

NEBR ASK Af BILL & CO. 



WESTERN NOVELTY ACT 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



JOHN 



JOHNNY 



MARTIN and ELLIOTT 

'THOSE FASHION PLATE DANCING BOYS" 

Direction MARK LEVY 



DAINTY QUEEN OF SENSATIONAL RHYTHMIC GRACE 

LA PETITE MERCEDES 

A GORGEOUS DISPLAY OF NOVEL RICHNESS 

Dinettes ARTHUR J. HORWITZ 



Thomas & Henderson 

The Black Steppers 

WATCH THEM IN VAUDEVILLE 



The Boy Who Canto Back 

In a New Act by Alba Spencer Ti 
ASK MY AGENT 



FAN NIE BIT.T.IF, 

KEELER — BELMONT 

"TAKING CHANCES." Direction MARK LEVY 

SKATING VENUSES 

IN VAUDEVILLE Direction HARRY WEBER 



IL_ 

Upside Down Comedians 



FRANCES DOUGHERTY 

Assisted by 

BOBBY LUCEY At piano 

In A LITTLE BIT OF EVERYTHING Direction THOS. FITZPATRICK 



FREDERICK H. SPEARE AND CO. 

OfiW the Not«J Comedy Sketch Hit, 

,9a 



66 



NOW HEADLINING LOEW CIRCUIT 



»» 



REPRESENTATIVE LOUIS WESLEY 



BENTELL BROS. 

Acrobatic Dancers 

IN VAUDEVILLE Direction MARK MONROE 



/AS. E. 



ED. F. 



WORLD & PEAT 

SINGING, DANCING AND COMEDY IN VAUDEVILLE 



PHYLLIS EUGENE 

CURWOOD and GORMAN 

Before the Honeymoon and After 



By HERMAN KAHN 

Copyrighted 



KATHRYN MI LEY 



n 



Nature's Own Comedienne' 

In Vaudeville 



Three IMorrie Sisters 

Singing. Dancing, Novelty 

New Act In Vaudeville 



AND 

. IN "A VAUDEVILLE SURPRISE" 

BOOKED SOLID U. B. O. DIRECTION JACK MAGANN 



Dan Dix & Virgil 



WITH STAMPEDE RIDERS 



RUTH 

a 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



AND 



JOE 

VI 

Direction HARRY P1NCUS 



BILLY GLASON 



Novelty -JUST SONGS" Character 



N. V. A. 



DIRECTION A. J. HORWITZ 



DIRECTION WENONAH M. TENNEY 



FRANKIE FAY 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



O'BRIEN & KING 

(Formerly O'Brien & Enur) 

In THE NEW PIANO PLAYER 



HENRY LOWY & LACEY SISTERS 



ECCENTRICITIES IN SONGS AND DANCES 



joDH KENNY and LaFRANCE ™» 

Direction TOM JONES 



PREMIER DANCERS 



— COLLINS & WEST—™ 

In a Comedy Skit, "The Book Agent" Direction, WENONAH TENNEY 



THE GIRL FROM 
BRIGHTON 

ENCHANTRESS OF RAGTIME ALLEY 



I KITTY FLYNN 



BOOKED SOLID 



ANNA. MARIE 

DAINTY COMEDIENNE IN VAUDEVILLE 



May 9, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 




and 
Caal- 



BURLESQUE 

Colombia Circuit 
Bowery Burlesquers — Hurtle * Seamon'e. New 

JTork. 7-12: Empire, Newark. 14-19; Em- 
pire, Brooklyn, 21-26; Casino, Brooklyn, 

28-June 2. 
BoBtonlana — Gaiety, Pittsburgh, 7-12. 
Behman Show — Empire. Newark, 7-12. 
Hastings' Big Show — Gaiety, St. Louis. 7-12; 

Columbia, Chicago, 14-10; Gaiety, Detroit, 

21-26 ; Empire, Brooklyn, 28-June 2 ; Casino, 

Brooklyn. 4-9. 
Hip, Hip, Hooray Girls — Casino, Philadelphia. 

7-12 ; Columbia, New York. 21-lndef. 
Hello, New York — Park, Bridgeport, 10-12. 
Irwin's Big Show— Star. Cleveland, 7-12: 

Gaiety, Buffalo. 14-19. 
Irwin's Majesties — Gaiety, Detroit, 7-12; 

Star, Cleveland, 14-10; Gaiety, Buffalo, 21- 

26. 
Liberty Girls — Palace, Baltimore, 7-12 ; Wash- 
ington, 14-19; Pittsburgh, 21; Cleveland, 

28. 
Maids of America — Boston, 7-12; Colombia, 

New York. 14-10; Casino, Brooklyn, 21-26; 

Empire, Newark, 28-June 2. 
Marlon's, Dave, Snow — Olympic, Cincinnati, 

7-12, 
Midnight Maidens — Grand, Hartford, 7-12. 
Merry Bounders— Casino. Brooklyn. 7-12. 
New York Girls— Empire, Toledo, O., 7-12. 
Puss Puss — Newburch and Pouchkeepsle, 7-12. 
Bag Doll In Ragland — Columbia, New York, 

7-12; Casino, Brooklyn. 14-10; Hurtlg te 

Seamon's, New York, 21-26. 
Boseland Girls — Gaiety. Kansas City, 7-12. 
Beeves', Al. Show— Gaiety, Boston, 7-12. 
Spiegel's Revue — ICmplre. Albany, 7-12 ; Hur- 

tlg A Seamon's, New York. 14-10: 
Sporting Widows — Gaiety, Buffalo, 7-12. 
Some Snow — Columbia, Chicago, 7-12 ; 

& Garter. Chicago. 14-19. 
Step Lively Girls — Lyric, Dayton, 7-12. 
Sightseers — Waterbury, 7-12 ; Newburgh 

Poughkeepsle, 14-10. 
Sldman, Sam, Show — Providence, 7-12 

no, Boston. 14-19. 
Twentieth Century Maids — Empire, Brooklyn, 

7-12. 
Billy Watson Show — Montreal, 7-12; Empire, 

Brooklyn. 14-10 : Empire. Newark, 21-26. 
Watson's. Billy, Show — Gaiety, Washington, 

7-12 : Gaiety, Pittsburgh, 14-10 ; Cleveland, 

21-26 ; Detroit, 28-June 2. 
Williams, Mollle — Star * Garter, Chicago, 7- 

12 ; Gaiety. Detroit. 14-19 j Gaiety. Buffalo, 

28-June 2; Empire, Brooklyn, 4-9; Casino, 

Brooklyn, 11-16. 

American Circuit 

Americans — Olympic, New York, 7-12. 

Cabaret Girls — Gaiety, Chicago, 7-12. 

French Frolics — Indianapolis, 7-12; Newark, 
O., 14 ; Zanesville, IB ; Canton, 16 ; Grand, 
Akron, 17-19 

Girls from the Follies — Gaiety, Brooklyn, 7- 
12. 

Girls from Joyland — Gaiety, Baltimore, 7-12. 

Military Maids — New Bedford, 7-9; Worces- 
ter, 10-12. 

Record Breakers — Penn Circuit. 7-12. 

Tempters — Star, Brooklyn, 7-12.- 

STOCK 

Academy Players — Haverhill, Mass.. lndef. 

American Players — Spokane, Wasb., lndef. 

Auditorium Players — -Maiden, Mass., lndef. 

Alcazar Players — San Francisco, 7-lndef. 

Angell Stock (Joe Angell, mgr.) — Park, 
Pittsburgh, lndef. 

Baker Stock — Portland, Ore., lndef. 

Bryant, Marguerite, Players — Yonngstown. 
O., until June 2. 

Bleeker Players — Albany, N. Y„ lndef. 

Bishop Players — Oakland, CaL, lndef. 

Bunting, Emma, Stock — San Antonio, Tex., 
lndef. 

Columbia Musical Stock — Oakland, CaL, ln- 
def. 

Cornell-Price Players — Wanseon, ' O., lndef. 

Dale, Kathryn, Stock — Omaha, Neb., lndef. 

Desmond, Mae, Co. (Ed. Caddy, mgr.) — 
Schenectady, N. Y., indef. 

Dublnsky Stock (Ed Dublnsky, mgr.) — St. 
Joseph, Mo., indef. 

Earl Stock (Larry Powers, mgr.) — Sharps- 
burg, Pa., lndef. 

Ecklmrdt, Oliver, Playera — Begins, Bask., 
Can., lndef. 

Emerson Playera — Lowell, Mass., lndef. 

Empire Players — Salem, Mass., lndef. 

Fifth Ave. Stock (Jacqnes E. Born, mgr.) — 
Fifth Ave., Brooklyn, lndef. 

Fields. Marguerite. Players — White Plains, 
N. Y., lndef. 

Gordinler Bros.. Stock — Ft. Dodge, la., lndef. 

Hyperion Musical Players — New Haven, 
Conn., lndef. 

Home, Col. F, P.. Stock — Akron, O., lndef. 

Jewett, Henry, Players — Copley, Boston, ln- 
def. _. 

Keith's Hudson Theatre, Stock — Union Hill, 
N. J., lndef. 

Keith Stock — Portland, Me., lndef. 

Knickerbocker Stock (Carl Miller, mgr.) — 
Philadelphia, lndef. 

Knickerbocker -Playera — Syracuse, N, Y„ ln- 
def. 

Lawrence, Del., Stock — San Francisco, lndef. 

Lyric Theatre Stock — Bridgeport, Conn., in- 
def. 

Lonergan Players IE. V. Phelan, mgr.) — 
Lynn, Mass., indef. 

Lewin. Florence, Players (Hawkins A Kibbee, 
mgrs.) — Wichita, Kan., indef. 

Morosco Stock — Los Angeles, indef. 

McKInley, Patti, Playera — Zanesvllte, O., ln- 
def. 

Manhattan Playera — Rochester, N. Y., indef. 

New Strand Stock — Mobile, Ala., lndef. 

Norwood, Maude, Stock (Win. J. Nelson, 
mgr.) — Oil City, Pa, lndef. 




Keabltt Players— WIlkes-Barre, Pa., lndef. 

Orphean) Players — Reading, Pa, lndef. 

Overbolser Stock — Oklahoma City, Okla, ln- 
def. 

Oliver, Otis, Playera (Harry J. Wallace, 
ingr.) — La Fayette, Ind., lndef. 

Payton, Cone, Stock — Lexington, New York, 
lndef. 

Poll Stock — Scranton. Pa., lndef. 

Poll Players— Poll's Washington, lndef. 

Poll Players— Worcester, Mass.. lndef. 

Packard, Jay, Stock— Newark, N. J., lndef. 

Price, Stanley, Players — Grand Rapids, Mica, 
lndef. 

Post, Jim, Stock — San Diego, CaL, lndef. 

Plckert Stock — Greensboro. N. C, 7-12; Co- 
lumbia, Pa, 14-10. 

Shubert Stock— Milwaukee, Indef. 

Shubert Stock— St Paul, lndef. 

Somervllle Theatre Players — SomerviUe, 
Mass, lndef. 

St. Clair, Winifred, Stock (Earl Slpe mgr.) — 
Trenton, N. J., lndef. 

Temple Stock — Ft, Wayne, Ind., lndef. 

Toler, Sydney, Stock — Portland, Me, lndef. 

T ravers-Douglas Stock — Grand O. H, Brook- 
lyn, lndef. 

Van Dyke ft Eaton Stock (F. Mack, mgr.)—. 
Tulsa, Okla, lndef. . 

Vees, Albert, Stock — Wheeling, w. Va, lndef 

Wilkea Players— Salt Lake City, lndef. 

Wilkes Mo steal Stock— Vancouver. Can., ln- 
def. 

Wadswortb Dram. Stock (Edward Orntteln, 
mgr.) — Toledo, O, lndef. 

Wallace. Chester, Players — Butler, Pa, lndef. 

Williams, Ed, Stock — Elkhart, Ind, indef. 

Williams. Ed., Stock— Qui ncy, 111, lndef. 

Woods, Lew, Stock — Syracuse, N. Y„ lndef. 

Walker. Stuart, Playera — Indianapolis, 14- 
lndef. 
star Woodward. O. D, Players — Denver, lndef. 



COMPANIES IN TABLOID PLAYS 

Permanent and Traveling 
Barker, Betty. Musical Berne — Enid, Okla., 

Clark. 'Billy, Comic Opera Co. — Vlsalta, CaL, 

0-11; Stockton, 18-15; Sacramento, 16-10; 

Reno, Nev, 20-22: Salt Lake City. 24-26. 
Gram lick's, Chas, Follies of the Day — Moose 

Jaw, Can, lndef. 
Reidway ft Burton M. C. Co.— Ml not, N. D„ 

lndef. 
Soladar. Chaa, & Brlnkley Girls — Braddock, 

Tabartn Girls— Ashland, Ky., 7-12. 
Walker's MubIc Ban (Ed. M. Moore, mgr.)— 

Mansfield. O, 10-12; Maeatllon, 14-10. 
Zarrow's American Girl Co. — Morgantown, 

Zarrow's 'Little' Bluebird Co. (Jack Fnqnay, 

mgr.) — Braddock, Pa, 7-12. 
Zarrow's Variety Review (D. J. Lynch, mgr.) 

— Chllllcothe, O, 7-12. 

(Continued on page 86.) 



WANTED 

INFORMATION concerning HARRY HORN, 
alias HARRY C PRENTICE, who has not been 
heard from by bis _ wife, Emily Horn, since 
1890. ( Anyone knowing his whereabouts will 
find it to their advantage to communicate with 
EMILY HORN, care of dipper. 



AT LIBERTY 

THOMAS J. MeELHANY 

Juvenile comedian; age 25; height S It. 7yi; 
weight 136. Flay and dress anything cast lor; 
consistent with description. Address care US 
Talbot Ave, Braddock, Pa. 



EUGENE 



ELIZABETH 



MacGREGOR & JANE 

Personal Direction 
CHAMBERLAIN BROWN 



PEP COMEDIANS 



THEODORE 



BILLY 



PANKEY McCARVER 

THE DEVIL AND THE 
WHITEWASH MAN 

Singing, Dancing and Talking 



HORNE STOCK COMPANY 



for SUMMER SEASON, young, up-to-date stock people in all lines who hsve had and can prove 
past experience: rep. actors will not do, but must be stock people with reputations. Win con- 
sider only single people, no joint engagements considered. This is a high-class city stock, one 
bill a week, dressing of parts an absolute essential. We know what yon are worth to n», U salary 
is out of reason don't expect an answer. If you misrepresent you will positively be closed on 
first rehearsal. Don't tell how great you are, but explain everything in first letter, give sge, 
weight, height, complexion, experience, late programs and send a photo that shows yon aa yon 
are today, not one taken ten years sgo. Dressing your parts is an absolute essential with this 
company. Also want full acting company for No. 2 Company, open hi g I dors Park, Youngs town, O., 
for entire summer, opening June 11th. Business managers, scenic artists, etc Can place hnm.nV 
atsly a No. 1 character woman who can do disjecta; must be young and good looking. Waat 
quick a real stock scenic artist. GEORGE BELUS wire quick. Address 

IF. I 3 . HORNE, IVIgr. 

HORNE STOCK CO, Music Hall AKRON, 0. 

WANTED AT ALL TIIVIES 

BURLESQUE PEOPLE 

CHAS. H. WALDRON WaldrW. Casino, Boston, Maw. 

1VEW HOTEL WARMER 

(EUROPEAN) 

Cottage. Grove Avenue and 33rd Stree t, Chicago 

Telephone Donglaa 6T8 

F. BURT CARR, President and Maaagar 

(Formerly with Victoria, Wellington and Morrison Hotels) 

THEATRICAL PATRONAGE DESIRED 

230 Ootald* Rooms. 200 Private Baths. Rooms with Prirste Bath. 11.00 per day aad upwards. Special 

Weakly aad Permanent Bates. FIREPROOF. EXCELLENT earn. POPTTLAB. PBICssB. 

WANTED FOR THE NEW YORK AMUSEMENT CO. 

MUSICAL COMEDY PEOPLE 

la all Lines — 10 chorus girls, musicians for B. ft O-, A-l stage director with scripts. Season opens 
May 12th. Rehesrsals call for everybody engaged May 7th. Report at Newcastle, Pa. 
COLISEUM THEATRE, Ellis A Schragsi, Mgrs. 



WANTED 
SARA MacDONALD CO. in "ADRIFT IN NEW YORK " 

TaU mm f or Btrftirht lead; mnp for strong character bury. Mait be targe, lttu for ebtvacter 
tough: man for comefly Dutch, and man for coon; women for Irian comedy; pUno player who cms 
doable stage. Tnote liolng specialties given preference. Btate all first letter, and lowest aalary. 
We pay all. Address by letter only. EDOAB G. STEPATH, Xgr., 434 Watt IMUi St., V. T. C. 

CENTRAL TRUNKS 

26 In., 113.50: 28 In., 114.60: 82 In., 115.50; 80 In., »1«,50; 40 In., 118.00. Circns Trunks. MxlBxlt, 
S13.50. Bill Trunks. 80x28x15. Inside. 117.00. Lltno Trunks, «2Vix2SViil2, Inside. (20.00. Shipped 00 
receipt of $8, balance C. O. D„ exeept over 800 miles, then remit the wool* amount. 
CENTRAL TRUNK FACTO BY. Est. 1804. FIMONS * CO., 8. w. cor. Tth and Arch Streets. Philadelphia. 



THE PARFAJT BLUES 

A Dollar", a Dollar, » Dime', a Dime, this eeVa the place, you'll say. It all the 

PARFAIT MODE SHOP 



A Trial W ill Cesrvtece YOU 
J. FEIGENBAUM A FELIX YOUNG. Mara. 
MS W. «Ms St, Suite TtX. New York 



Bryasst 



SONGWRITERS 



KNIClsXRBOCKER ST UDIOS,iz7 GSapThaSc BtiLfa&K. T. City 



THE 



D E 



754-756 EIGHTH AVENUE. B:i. 4tith and 47th STREETS . . .-' 

<■». Cattrlnu only lo r^'c.-niii-d l)if ;,lriul irtiiti MRS. Gt.OKtlK HIEGCI-. Ml 



PERRON'S DETECTIVE ACENCY. Harry W. Ferron. Principal.-" 
thorLz«:d by State- Bonded, ^;- Personal, to Theatrical Profession. Per 
Criminal investigations, confidentially conducted. Piion 
Bryant. FiUger.ld Bldg., 1482 Br-o»J««y, N.-w Y'e.rlt Cil 



WANTED 



Inxenaa type leading woman; second woman, who ran do one or two soabrettea; maa for charsctars and 
gen. bos. ; man for juveniles and gen. bus. Property maa who knosrs tent electricity. Preference to thee 
doubling brass snd with specialties. Clerer child for parts and specialties. Pianist doubling band. 
Ifnsiciini, all instruments. R ehea r sals stay flat. State all In first. Pay own. Weak stands. Vsraey, 
Tneker and Bollinger wire at once. People an lines write. H. W. ItaXOS, Xlga sad tea S. W„ 
Osatea, o. 



34 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



May 9, 1917 



EARL LINDSAY 

and 

PHYSIOC & STORY 

ROOM 810, 1432 BROADWAY, NEW YORK 
Have immediate engagements for competent principals and chorus girls for Productions, Vaudeville 

Revues and Pictures. 



AGENTS GET HEP I 

COIN BIG MONEY QUICK 

Sell the most complete line of 

Photo-Handled Knives for Sales Boards 

Knives are all made of best steel. Handles with the latest REAL ART, SEPTEM- 
BER MORN, JESS WILLARD and other ATTRACTIVE DESIGNS. We want 
Agents in every city and town. We manufacture our own Knives, and, therefore, 
we are not dependent on foreign supplies. We ship promptly. We are the largest 
manufacturers and Distributors or Photo-Handled Knives for Sales Boards 
and Raffle Cards in the United States. Write us and we will' see that you are 
promptly supplied. Ask for catalog and terms today. Do not delay. 

WE ASSIGN YOU TERRITORY AND PROTECT YOU IN IT 

GOLDEN RULE CUTLERY CO. 

*, 212 No. Sheldon Street Dept 58 Chicago, 111. 




■"•-••Vi/vsi; 

Oar Nww Factsrr 



FRENCH'S AEROPLANE GIRLS 

Just returned from a successful tour of the West 

DIRECTION RUSH JERMON 



phiiip AUSTIN&BAILEY Leo 



IN "A SYNCOPATED HOTEL" 



DIRECTION PETE HACK 



OPEN FOR ENGAGEMENT 



The World's Greatest Mystery Act 

BY PROF. JULIUS ZANCIG 

(FORMERLY OF THE ZANCIGS) 

Prof. Zancig begs to announce to Managers and Agents his return to the stage with a novelty act, 100% superior to the old 
act, entitled 'THE MIRACLE OF THE CRYSTAL," something positively new. An act which will create a sensation. 
Length of act 18-25 minutes, full stage. Write 

JULIUS ZANCIG - - 155 West 22nd St., New York, N. Y. 



May 9, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



35 



ROUTES (Continued from page 33) 
MINSTRELS 

Carter's, Suiann, Black A White Minstrels — 
Guthrie, Okla., 10-12; Lawton, 18-19. 

DeBue Bros. — Clayton, N. T. f 9; Theresa, 
10 ; Hammond, 11 ; Ogdenaborg, 12 ; Nor- 
wood, 14 ; Msssens, IS ; Brushton, 16 ; 
Tapper Lake, 17: Saranac Lake. 18; Lake 
Placid, 19. 

CARNIVALS 

Adams. Otis L... Show* — Logan, O., 7-12. 

Benson 4 Berger Shows — Eddystone, Pa., 1- 

12. 
Campbell's United Shows— St. Louis, 7-12. 
Foley 4 Bark Shows— Santa Eosa, Cal„ 7-12. 
Greater Sheesley Shows — Bridgeport, Conn., 

7-12. 
Great American Shows — Mlddletown, O., 7- 

12. 
Great Cosmopolitan Shows — Centralis, I1L, 

7-12. 
Hopper Greater Shows — Seymour, Tex., 7- 

12. 
Kennedy, Con T., Shows — Norfolk, Va_, 7-12. 
Metropolitan Shows — Gastonla, N. C. 7-12. 
Mighty Doris Expo. Shown — McKces Bocks, 

Pa_, 7-12. 
McClellan Shows — Eldorado, Kan., 7-12. 
Koger's Greater Shows — Huntington, W. Va., 



oger's 
7-12. 



Reynolds, George, Shows — Williamson. W. 
Va.. 7-12. 

Sibley's Superb Shows — So. Bethlehem, Pa,, 
7-12. 

Washburn's, Leon W., Midway Shows- 
Chester, Pa., 7-12. 

World at Home Shows — Boone, la., 7-12. 

Wortham Bros. Shows — Cashing, Okla., 7-12. 

Zeldman & Polie Shows — Kalamazoo, Mich., 



-12. 



CIRCUSES 



Barnes, Al. G. — Eugene, Ore., 9; Albany, 10; 
Salem, 11; McMUmvllle, 12. 

Cole Bros. — Blacktoot, Idaho, 9 ; Mackay, 10 ; 
St. Anthony, 11 ; Idaho Falls, 12. 

Gentry Bros. — Linton, I1L, 9. 

Hagenbeck-Wallace— Warren, O., 9; Youngs- 
town, lO; Cleveland, 11-12. 

La Tena's — Doylestown, Pa., 9 ; Ambler, 10 ; 
Consbobocken, 11; Vlneland, N. J., 12. 

lUngllng Bros. — Zanesrllle, O., 0: Marietta, 
10; Clarksburg, W. Vs., 11; Cumberland, 
Ind.. 12: Washington, D. C. 14-15; Balti- 
more, 16-17; Wilmington, Del., 18; At- 
lantic City. 10. 

Sells-Floto Shows — Qulncy, 111., 9 ; Danville, 
10 ; Champaign, 11 ; Crawfordsvllle, Ind., 
12; Indianapolis, 14. 

Wlllard, Jess, A Buffalo Bill Show — Bsston, 
Pa., 8; Wilkes-Barre, 10; Scranton, 12; 
Blogharoton, N. Y„ 13; Albany, 18. 

Vankee Itohlnson Shows — Stockton, 111., 9; 
Dubuque, la., 10 ; Manchester, 11 ; Water- 
loo, 12. 



EILEEN SHERIDAN 

Per Dir. 

CHAMBERLAIN BROWN 



MADISON'S BUDGET No.16 

Edited and published by James Madison and 
111 put my name to nothing- that I don't 
consider prime. Contests Include 12 orig- 
inal monologues, 8 great acts for two 
males and 7 (or male and female, a bright 
Irish act for three people, 20 sure-fire paro- 
dies. 4 professional minstrel first-parti, a 
scresmlDg tabloid comedy; also hundreds of 
nifty gftga and funny sidewalk hits. MADI- 
SON'S BUDGET No. 18 cost* ONE DOLLAR. 
JAMES Jt&EISON, UBS Third Arena*, Me» 
York. 



At Liberty 

Ann Lester 

Loads. FIts feet Are Inches; age 25. 

Hugh Lester 

JotsbJIss, light and Character Comedy. 

Five feet six Inc hes; sg« 23. 
Specialties. Address HUGH LESTER. 
MS Massachusetts Ave., Boiton, Mass, 

WANTED 

Girls, who understand playing of brass 
instruments, for musical comedy at- 
traction. 40 weeks' contract. State 
all in first letter. EUGENE WOLFF. 
HEIM, C/o Clipper, New York. 

SISTER TEAM and CHORUS GIRLS 

wanted for big time set to open soon. Ail week. 
MOB. J. I.UBXH, Merry Maid Minstrels, Mutual 
Ball, 468 9th Ave., Hew York City. 

Wanted — Repertoire Company 

O R P H E U M THEATRE, LIMA, 
OHIO, weeks of May 21 and 28, per- 
centage basis only proposition would 
consider. "Rep" Show closes season 
at Lima every year to a Phenomenal 
Business. Address GUS SUN, Spring- 
field, Ohio. 

ACTOR AT LIBERTY 

Heavies, characters, comedy, some specialties. Can 
direct. Have scripts. Age 30. Height ft. 11 
inches, weight 170. VhudI repertoire salary. Ticket 
If over 13.00 It. It JOSEPH MERRILL. Oen. Del.. 
Oswego, N. T. 

WANTED— A Copy of The) N. Y. 
CLIPPER, dated MARCH 24, 1006. Will 
pay any reasonable price. F. M. C, 
care of CLIPPER. 



WANTED: SEASON 1917-18 

Musical Comedy People in all Unas. 3 complete road companies. 

"The Million Dollar Doll"— 35 people, Eastern and Western Company. 

"The Million Dollar Doll"— (Tab.) 30 people. Central States. 

"There She Goes" — 40 people, playing Eastern time. To Principals and Chorus ,of ability, 

good wages and a long season without a lay-off. 

WANTED— Musicians for a feature JAZZ orchestra. Feature vaudeville acts and other 

novelties. Apply by | etter onIy . HARVEY D. ORR, 1512 Tribune Bldg., Chicago, IU. 



FRANCIS 



FRANK 



WOOD and WARNOCK 



Novelty Act — In Vaudeville 



NORMAN & IDA TAYLOR 



12% in 1 or 2. 



In A LAUGHING ABSURDITY 

"OFFICER SIX, SIX, 7/8" 



"IN VAUDEVILLE" 



BOBBY BERNARD 

Featured Comedian with Win. B. Friediander's Suffragette Revue 
THE COMEDY FTNP OP THE SEASON 

Wanted For The Brooks Stock Co. 

Permanent stock, two bills a week; people in all lines; general business people; 
man for leads; scenic artist. Want only clean people who dress well, on and off. 
-Must join at once. Address JACK BROOKS, Burlington, Iowa. 



WANTED QUICK 



FOR 



BILLY CUNNINGHAM AND HIS OWN CO. 

A-l Ingcoue-Lrcading woman, Good Cwct. Bus. man not over 5 ft. 9 or 150 lbs. wbo can do Genteel 
Heavies. Other useful Rep. people write. All people mutt be young, Al modern wardrobe and 
ability. Disorganized and trouble makers save your stamps, that is the cause of the ad. Send 
late photos ana programs. Must join on wire. Addreas May 7 and week. Cumberland. Maryland; 
May 14 and week, Westminster. Maryland. 

Wanted— RepertoirePeople 

all lines, with specialties, given preference. Vaudeville tea 
parts; actor musicians. Year's work. Salary absolutely si 

" CO, 



experience. 



Vaudeville team, playing responsible 
sure. State salary, age, 
Address EARL HAWK BIG STOCK CO., Johnson City, Term. 



<J. E. FABER 



THEATRICAL UPHOLSTERING 
IN ALL ITS BRANCHES 

Repairing Box Springs, Mattresses, Cushions, Slip Covers, etc This is a specialty 
with ua. 41 W. tlik St. NEW YORK Telephone, Bryant 1677. 



WANTED— Non-Union Stage Hands 

A stage carpenter, electrician and property man. A long and 
lucrative engagement to experienced men. Address: J. B. ALLEN, 
Room 538, Knickerbocker Theatre Bldg., New York City. 

Wanted for PICKERT STOCK CO. 

Now in Fifty-fifth week, for Summer and Regular lesson. Heavy Man and Gen. Business Man 
who can double piano. Preference given people with specialties. Other useful men with spe- 
cialties write. Year around work. Managers munition towns in Pennsylvania write for time. 
Week May 7, Greensboro, N. C; week May 14, Columbia, Pa. People who wrote before, write 
again. 

AT LIBERTY 

Anthony Lesser 

Leads and 2nd bus. Stock or repertoire. Age 23. Height 5 ft. 10 ins. Weight 
150. Address KEARNY HOTEL, Altoona, Pa. 

T"l,Th "VsTlM T sfsTarVvt aOa^aSX gT 80N0B OR INSTBUKEMTAI. KUSI01 If so. 

*-**-»* « V^«__-> <^*~'1V1S^V/^S^ )w HurK t „ „„,,. Kfm . arrnni;.-.! I.} nn expert: 
an artistic arranjr.mrnt may mean Slice**.. I bjiv, don* hundred* of tils lilt.. Writ*- ur < nil nrtvrri'.ina. 
S-S. ET/OENX PLATZXAHN, 145 W. Itth St., H«w York. 



TENNEY 



Ua. tb. Parcel Post "deliver* the goods." Act*, aaatoh... and znonolorua*. wrlttae 
right. Tbsy'rs 'all of originality, "pep'* sad "gat-ovsr." Don't wish for s 000D 
act. havs Tonnoy writ* yon os*. Corr*tpond*nc* aolioiud. 

ALLEN SPENCER TENNEY. Ho. 14BS Broadway. B*w York City. 



ALLIANCE HOTEL 

-258 West 4-Ith Street, New York City 
AMERICAN AND EUROPEAN PI.AN. 40 Srro. <K from IW.i.lw.iy. I*r..fc»- 



irc prnrnodutibiiS 



Tel. Bryant 6068. 



BOB & PEGGY VALENTINE 

"Vital Statistics"— A New Comedy Act in "One" 

IN VAUDEVILLE 

KEENE & WILLIAMS 



A Real Comedy Act in One. 

NOW PLAYING 



Special Scenery 



SAMMY 



—GOLD & SEAL— 



ELI 



Those Champagne Boys in "BITS OF VARIETY" 

DIRECTION ROSE a CURTIS 

Wanted for Bowdish Big Stock Co. 

OPENING UNDER CANVAS 

Two Gen. Bus. Men, also man for juvenile and Al comedian, also character woman, those 
doubling band and doing specialties preferred. Violinist, tuba, trombone and Al trap drummer, 
lozzers and disturbance makers closed without notice. Those requiring tickets roust give Al 
security. Rehearsals open 21, show opens May 28th. Notice, state your lowest at we pay all. 
Address BOWDISH BIG STOCK CO., BrookvUla, Pa. 

VIRGINIA. KELSY 

DOUBLE VOICE PRIMA DONNA 



HERBERT 



TRLXJE 



HOEY and SMITH 



COMEDY—SONG— DANCE 



Direction, JACK LEWIS 



36 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



May 9, 1917 



AT THE 5th AVE. NOW 

'•THE PEARL OF* THE PACIFIC" 




Assisted byherClever Sister and Five Native 

Direct from Wai-Ki-Ki 



BEAUTY—FIRE— GRACE— SOUTH SEA CHARM ARE BLENDED IN JONLA'S DANCING. SHE IS THE EXQUISITE 

NATIVE EXPRESSION OF THE HAWAIIAN CRAZE. 



BOOKED DIRECT BY THE U. B. O. 



Princess Leilokelani— Big Hit at San Francisco World Fair 



Arthur De Voy & Co, 

In "HIS WIFE'S MOTHER" 



Now in Our 2Jth W«*k 



Jack 



MARY L. MAX FIELD 

Little Miss Personality 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



WILLIE 






JAMES 


ADAMS 


and 


REID 


IN AMATEUR 


NIGHT 


DIRECTION PHIL BUSH 






BOOKED SOLID 



ZITA LYONS 

"Venus of the Show World" 

IN VAUDEVILLE 




PROFESSIONAL COPIES and ORCHESTRATIONS READY 

JOS. W. STERN & CO. 

L. WOLFE GILBERT, Professional Manager 
1554 BROADWAY, NEW YORK 



May 9, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



37 



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SID 








Is Still Raving About 

HARRY WEBER 



■Willi 1 1 i ill III nil 



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a"ce MORIARITY SISTERS "«« 

DRESDEN POLLS OF VAUDEVILLE Direction irvtnc shannon 

JOSEPHINE LENHART 

The Diminutive Songster in vaudevilif 

EARY & EARY 

WH1RLWINP NOVELTY GYMNASTS NEW TO THE EAST 

Gertrude Lang 

Singing and Dancing — Soubrette and Ingenue In Vaudeville 



STONE . fit LE SOIR 

PRESENTING 

12 ROYAL TROUBADOURS 

Singers and Instrumentalists 

Dinctloa-LEE MUCKENFUSS 



The World's greatest animal impersonator at your service, address 

care of dipper 



JNCE THEIR PURCHASE OF 



i 



1 



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ELTY SONG HIT 



Professional Copies and Orchestrations Obtainable in 
'FRISCO of E. S. FLORINT1NE, 111 Kearny Street 

In CHICAGO, JOS. W. STERN & CO., 119 North 
Clark Street MAX J. STONE in Charge 



38 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



May 9, 1917 



ffi%S^L$~M Mi 





WORLD STARTS 

FILM THIEF 

WAR 

TWO CAUGHT IN BRIBE NET 



The World Film Co. has started a 
nation wide war on *junk" film exchanges of 
questionable character. Following the pre- 
liminary bearing of two men charged with 
attempting to get prints from the World's 
New York exchange by bribery, it was re- 
vealed that hundreds of reels have been 
stolen or duped from various exchanges in 
the last year. The thefts netted their per- 
petrators revenue well over a half million 
dollars, it is said. 

George Schaefer, manager of the World 
exchange in New York, who testified 
against the defendants last week, declare* 
he has a list of over 1,000 films, ranging 
from .1 to 5 reels, which have either been 
stolen outright or "doped." He added the 
sensational assertion that there are over 
thirty junk exchanges in New York alone, 
against which the company has reasonable 
evidence of thievery. 

The most startling attempt at crooked 
practice, which he mentioned, was that of 
an outfit that offered the full seven prints 
of "The Seven Deadly Sins" for sale out- 
right for $1,000, before this series was 
actually released. Emissaries of the World 
negotiated with the tricksters, and were 
on the point of paying the money in 
marked bills, to ensnare them, when the 
thieves sniffed trouble and pulled out of 
the transaction. 

The men under charges last week gave 
their names as James MeSanley, thirty- 
two years old. a clerk, and Alexander 
Wolfsheimer, twenty-four years old, an 
operator. It was charged they offered an 
employe of the World $35 to permit them 
to take films to be duplicated. The men 
were held for the grand jury. Stolen or 
- duplicated films are sent to South America. 



BROADWAY TO SEE LEWIS FILM 

It has been decided to give "The Bar 
Sinister" a Broadway run, beginning some- 
time about the end of this month. This 
feature, the first of the Edgar Lewis Pro- 
ductions, received such high praise from 
the critics at a private showing that Frank 
Hall, who purchased the world rights be- 
lieves it entitled to a New York showing. 



CHOOSE NEXT CASTLE SCENARIO 

The Pathe Company has announced that 
the first Gold Rooster feature in which 
Mrs. Vernon Castle will be starred is a 
detective story that will probably be called 
"Carrol of the Secret Service." Work 
on this feature has already been started 
under the direction of George Fitzmaurice. 



COCHRANE BECOMES FATHER 

P. D. Cochrane, brother of B, H. Coch- 
rane, vice-president of the Universal Film 
Manufacturing Co., who is in charge of 
the poster department for that concern 
became the father of an eight-pound son 
last Thursday. Both Mrs. Cochrane and 
the youngster are said to be doing well. 



HART JOINS TRIANGLE 

William V. Hart has left the sales forces 
of the Bluebird Film Co. to join the ranks 
of the Triangle Distributing Corporation. 



LASKY HAS 3 JUNE RELEASES 

Jesse L. Lasky has completed three pro- 
ductions to be released by Paramount 
during the month of June, starring Mar- 
garet Illington, Fannie Ward and Sessue 
Hayakawa. 

The literary talent represented in these 
three productions includes the novelist 
Basil King, the playwright George Middle- 
ton, and photoplay technicians such as 
Beatrice C. De Mille, Leighton Osmun and 
Charles Maigne. Margaret Illington will 
appear in "The Inner Shrine," an adapta- 
tion of Basil King's well known novel. 
Fannie Ward will star in "Her Strange 
Wedding," and Sessne Hayakawa will ap- 
pear in "The Jaguar's Claws." 



PATHE SERIALS POPULAR 

That Serials are going strong is proved 
by authentic information to the effect that 
the business of the Pathe Exchanges has 
donbled in the last year. Credit for this 
showing is given to the serials simply be- 
cause Pathe is generally known as the 
"house of serials," bnt possibly equal honors 
should be given to the efficient sales force 
that has been organized and trained to sell 
the Pathe product on advanced commercial 
lines. 



FORTH GRABS HIS CHANCE 

The way George J. Forth, a very young 
motion picture artist, grabbed the first big 
chance that came bis way in the Vitagrapb 
feature "The Sixteenth Wife," is one of 
the notable things about this unusual pic- 
ture. Mr. Forth is cast as leading juvenile. 
He makes a dashing reporter, whose ad- 
ventures include saving the dancer from a 
life In the Kadir's harem. 



COP IS MOVIE ACTOR 

Frank L. A. O'Connor, a former police- 
man of the 279th New York precinct, 
has made good as a movie actor. Mr. 
O'Connor appeared in "Madame Sherry." 
His next picture will be "The Silent Wit- 
ness," a strong Mutual feature. 

MUTUAL STARS HAVE BIRTHDAYS 

It was one thing after another at the 
Mutual plants last month. Mary Miles 
Minter had a birthday on the first, Will- 
iam Russell's natal day came on the 
twelfth, and Charlie Chaplin celebrated 
on the sixteenth. 



DE MILLE TO DIRECT AGAIN 

William C. De Mille, who has been 
giving his entire attention to scenario 
work at the Lasky studios, will again take 
up the work of directing. The first pro- 
duction under the new arrangement will be 
"The Ghost House," starring Louise Huff 
and Jack Pickford. 



ACTRESS NEARLY BURNED 

Greater Vitagrapb very nearly lost its 
most recent star on Wednesday morning, 
May ~2, when the home of Miss Mildred 
-Manning, at 255 West Seventy-second 
Street, was damaged by fire, and Miss 
Manning just escaped being a victim of 
the blaze. 



SAFE AND SANE 

According to the press agent. Viola Dana 
is taking a correspondence course in avia- 
tion. Learning to fly in the sanctity of 
one's library is both safe and sane and is 
in strict accord with the principles of 
Safety Always. Hope Miss Dana does not 
carry her study further. 



BARRYMORE SUPPORT PICKED 

Cecil Owen, now playing with Jane 
Cowl in "Lilac Time," has been engaged 
to support Ethel Barrymore in her forth- 
coming Metro photodrama, "The Greatest 
Power." 



DORIS KENYON BACK 

Doris Kenyon, the motion picture actress, 
returned to New York last week after an 
absence of nine weeks at Saranac Lake. 
N. Y., where she was engaged in picture 
work. 



LOEW TAKES ART DRAMAS 

The Loew Circuit last week booked the 
Art Dramas program, displacing another 
brand from its schedule. 



'BIRTH CONTROL' 
FILM BARRED 
IN NEW YORK 



PRODUCERS FIGHT DECREE 



Commissioner Ben, of the New Xork 
License Bureau, suppressed the film "Birth 
Control," featuring Margaret Sanger, Sun- 
day, when it was to start a run at the 
Park Theatre. A large crowd that came 
to witness the production was greeted by 
a notice pasted in the lobby, announcing 
tiie Commissioner's action, and the plan of 
the Message Photoplay Corp. to sue for an 
injunction against Bell. 

That evening a committee was appointed 
to petition the Mayor on behalf of the 
pictures. The film company, which is 
backed by B. S. Moss, intends to sue 
Bell for $10,000 damages. 

"Birth Control" gives Mrs. Sanger's 
story of how she was led to spread prop- 
aganda for the limitation of offspring, by 
her experience as a trained nurse. 



UNIVERSAL FILM OPENS SUNDAY 

"The Hand that Rocks the Cradle," a 
Universal feature, is announced for show- 
ing next Sunday at the Broadway Theatre, 
this city. The picture, which was prepared 
under the direction of Lois Weber and 
Phillips Smalley, deals with the subject 
of birth control. 



HODKINSON BACK FROM WEST 

W. W. Hodkinson, president of the 
Triangle Distributing Corporation, is back 
from his seven weeks' tour of the West, 
during which time he visited Chicago, 
Denver, Salt Lake City, San Francisco, 
Los Angeles, Spokane, Seattle and Port- 
land. 



VTTAGRAPH INVENTS TITLES 
The Greater Vitagrapb has instituted 
several innovations in title making. One 
is the "animated" title, which moves up- 
ward across the screen. The other is the 
"articulating" title, in which the words are 
flashed separately on the screen. 



FOX FEATURES NEARLY READY 

William Fox win release two produc- 
tions May 21. One win be "Heart and 
Soul," a super de luxe picture, featuring 
Theda Bars. The other win be "The 
Final Payment," in which Nance O'Nefl 
will star. 



HENABERRY TO ASSIST EMERSON 

Joseph Henaberry, who recently com- 
pleted an engagement as a Fine Arts 
director, has been engaged to assist John 
Emerson in the production of Douglas 
Fairbanks- Artcraft pictures. Henaberry is 
expected to be unusually adept in producing 
Fairbanks films as he is greatly in sym- 
pathy with the athletic star. 



WOMEN TO REPLACE MOVIE MEN 

The Universal Film Co. began last night 
holding classes for women who wish to 
take the places of the men who go to war. 
The classes, which are conducted by Man- 
uel F. Goldstein, are for the purpose of 
instructing the women how to edit films, 
operate projecting machines and cameras, 
and do every kind of work now being done 
by men in the mechanical departments. 

LASKY HELPS DIRECTORS 

On his return from a visit to the Lasky 
studios at Hollywood, Cat, Jesse L. 
Lasky announced last week the policy of 
giving an his directors free rein in the 
making of pictures.. This is permitted, he' 
said, by the plan to put Paramount pic- 
tures on the open booking system without 
regular release dates. 



WHEELER BILL FAVORED 

Axbaitt, May 6. — The committee on 
rules in the lower house of the Legis- 
lature has reported favorably the Wheeler 
motion picture bin, imposing a sweeping 
tax on aU branches of the film industry. 
The bm win be put np for passage next 
Monday. 



MARIE PA VIS JOINS FOX 

Marie Pavis, known as a film player and 
scenario writer, has joined the WiUiam 
Fox forces in Los Angeles Miss Pavis is 
at present working in the western scenario 
department, but will soon join one of the 
companies as an actress. 



BLACHE SIGNS PLAYERS 

Catherine Calvert, widow of Paul Arm- 
strong, Frank Mills and Kittens Reichert 
have been engaged by Herbert Blache, of 
the United. States Amusement Corp., for 
appearance in his next production, "The 
House of Cards." 



FRANCE FILM GETS GRAY 

Gordon Gray has severed his connection 
with the Vitagrapb Co., and has signed 
with the France Film Corporation of 
Mount Vernon. "The Natural Law" wiH 
be the first release in which he win appear. 

HOYT COMEDIES NEARLY READY 

The K-E-S-E releasing exchanges will 
begin the distribution this month of ten 
of the late Charles H. Hoyt's comedies, 
in two-reel subjects. They were produced 
by the Selig Polyscope Co., of Chicago. 

MAX1NE ELLIOTT GOING ABROAD 

Marine Elliott, who has just finished 
two productions for Goldwyn, is about to 
set sail for England, where she will spend 
a part of the Summer before resuming her 
war relief work. 



"GREETERS" HONOR GEO. COHAN 

The Greeters Club, of San Francisco, at- 
tended the first presentation of "Broadway 
Jones" at the Strand Theatre, that city, 
which marked the screen debut of Cohan in 
Frisco. This was a very unusual honor 
for the "Greeters" to pay to anyone. 




William A. Brady,' Director-General. 

WORLD - PICTURES 

present 

CARLYLE BLACKWELL 
and JUNE ELVIDGE 



«n 



CRIMSON 



Cast rnrlnding DION TITHERADGE 
Directed by ROMAINE FIELDING 



J 



May 9, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



39 



FEATURE FILM REPORTS 



"GRAY HORSE TROOP" 

Vitagraph. Six Reels. 

Released May 7 by Vitagraph. 

Cast. 

Copt. George Curtis. .... . Antonio Moreno 

Jennie, hit titter Mrs. Bradbury 

Crawling Elk Otto Lederer 

Cut-Finger Al Jenningt 

Hit Wife Neola May 

Col Btreeter .Robert Burnt 

Lawton Edward Cecil 

EsSenator Brisbane H. A. Harrow 

Eltie, hie daughter Edith Storey 

Story— Drama, written by Hamlin Gar- 
land. Director, William Wolbert. 
Action — Rapid. 
Continuity— Smooth. 
Suspense — Sustained. 
Detail— O. K. 
Atmosphere— Good. 
Photography — Excellent. 
Remarks. 
"The Captain of the Gray Horse Troop" 
is an excellent picture of Westers set- 
tlers and their relations with, the Indiana. 
Indian life and customs are portrayed in a 
convincing manner. The opening scenes 
are particularly beautiful, showing their 
peaceful mode of living before the white 
men took the land away from them. 

Curtis, the Captain of the Gray Horse 
Troop, is made government agent, replac- 
ing one whose unscrupnlonsness has made 
it uncomfortable for the red men. His 
kindness to the Indians wins their love 
and trust and he defeats the efforts of 
cattlemen, who through political graft, at- 
tempt to oast the Indians from their ter- 
ritory. 

Ex-Senator Brisbane is a powerful fac- 
tor against the Indians, and his daughter, 
with whom Curtis has fallen in love, at 
first sides against the young officer. A 
sheep herder is then murdered and the 
enraged settlers invade the town to re-' 
venge themselves on the Indians, whom 
they believe guilty. A battle is averted by 
the arrival of the Gray Horse Troops, for 
whom Curtis has sent. Curtis discovers 
the guilty Indian and escorts him safely 
to the jail, which so angers the white men 
that they plan to mob him. Elsie by this 
time has been won over by Curtis, and, 
learning of her love Curtis braves the 
wrathful mob and manages to subdue them 
and order once more reigns. 

Box Office Value. 
Two or three days. 



"LITTLE MISS FORTUNE" 

Erbograph. Five Reels. 

Releated May 10 by Art Dramas 

Cast 

Sit .Marian Bvoayne 

Flossie LueUe Dorrington 

Jim Hugh Thompson 

Ned Bradley Barker 

Story — Dramatic. Written by Rev. Clar- 
ence J. Harris. Directed by Joseph 
Devering. Featuring Marian Swayne. 
Action — Very interesting. 
Continuity — Consistent. 
Suspense— Sustained. 
Detail— Correct. 
Atmosphere— Convincing. 
Photography — Excellent. 
Remarks. 
Author, director, camera man and play- 
ers have combined to make "Little Miss 
Fortune" one of the best screen products 
shown in a projection room hereabouts 
this season. 

Marian Swayne in this picture proves 
herself to be one of our best screen stars. 
She possesses a remarkably pleasing per- 
sonality, a sweet face and an irresistible 
smile. She is altogether charming and 
makes Sis a most lovable character. All 
the members of the company, including a 
young boy and a little tot do capital work. 
Box Office Value. 
Two days. Will hold any audience. Ad- 
vertise Marian Swayne together with some 
of the best dramatic scenes. 



"MILLIONAIRE'S DOUBLE" 

Rolf e Photoplays. Five Reels. 

Releated April 30 by Metro. 

Cast. 

Bide Bennington Lionel Barrymore 

Constance Brent Evelyn Brent 

Richard Qlendon Harry S. Northrup 

Jamet Brmt H. H. Pattee 

Stevent John Smiley 

"Kid" Burn* Jack Raymond 

Bob HoUovay Louis Wolheim 

Story — Drama, written by June Mathia 

Directed by Harry Davenport. Photog- 
raphy by John M. Bauman. 
Action — Entertaining. 
Continuity— Even. 
Suspense — Sustained. 
Detail— Correct. 
Atmosphere — Convincing. 
Photography — Good. 

R em a rk s. 

Although the picture lags in interest at 
first, as soon as the action is speeded np 
with the injection of comedy it becomes 
delightfully entertaining. 

Bide Bennington, a young American 
millionaire, returns to New York from 
abroad and, finding himself forgotten, de- 
cides to take a trip across the continent. 
A burglar enters his house while be is 
gone and takes a sealskin coat and some 
valuable papers, but is himself killed and 
thrown into the river. The coat is found 
on the pier, and Bennington is reported 
to have committed suicide. 

He returns to New York upon hearing 
that his "widow" has claimed his estate, 
and finds the "widow" to be Constance 
Brent, who is aiding Richard Glendon, 
leader of a band of crooks, because he 
threatens to expose her father, an English 
fugitive. 

She and Glendon notice Bennington's 
resemblance to the supposed dead man, and 
he, in order to trap them, allows them to 
persuade him to enter the conspiracy to 
obtain his own estate. 

The three take up a residence in the 
Bennington home. As the days pass, Bide 
falls in love with Constance, who, upon 
the death of her father, confesses to him 
her reason for being in the conspiracy. 
Bide then promises to lead an honest life 
and tarns Glendon. over to the police, but 
is himself taken into custody. He is de- 
tained, however, only until the arrival of 
his valet, who identifies Mm, and he is 
then released, returning to Constance. 

Box Office Value. 
Ought to be able to attract for three 
days. 



TWO VITAGRAPH HITS ON BDWV 

Last week the Greater Vitagraph had 
two pictures running In Broadway theatres 
within two blocks of each other, and both 
played to capacity business. "Within the 
Law," at the Broadway Theatre, has had 
the unanimous praise of every New York 
theatrical critic and is drawing such large 
business that the Vitagraph will continue 
its presentation in another large theatre on 
Broadway after its limited engagement at 
the Broadway Theatre if a suitable theatre 
can be secured. "The Sixteenth Wife," 
at the Rialto Theatre, has drawn capacity 
business at each performance 



SURATT BACK FROM LAKEWOOD 

Valeska Suratt and her company have 
returned from Lakewood, N. J., where they 
went to make the interiors of her coming 
Fox release. Among those who accom- 
panied her were her director, William 
Nigh, and Violet Palmer. 



MUST KNOW EXHIBITORS 

Albert W. Goff, assistant general man- 
ager of V-L-S-E, has issued instruc- 
tions to the twenty-seven branch man- 
agers of V-L-S-E to become personally 
acquainted with every exhibitor in their 
respective territories. 




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IVAN FILM PRODUCTIONS, Inc. 



ANNOUNCE THE OPENING 
FOR AN INDEFINITE RUN OF 



Ivan Abramsons 



DYNAMIC FILM EPIC OF 
RUSSIA AND AMERICA 



"One Law for Both" 



at the 



LYRIC THEATRE 

Broadway at Forty-second Street 

NEW Y OR K CITY 

SUNDAY, MAY THIRTEENTH 



At a Scale of Prices ranging to ONE DOLLAR 



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HEDWIG LABORATORIES, Inc. 

729 Seventh Avenue, New York City 

AT FORTY-NINTH STREET— GODFREY BUILDING BRYANT 7190-7191 



Developing 
Printing 
Editing 




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WE GUARANTEE THE QUALITY 



EXPERTS TO THE FILM INDUSTRY 



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The only modern and thoroughly equipped laboratory located in the heart of the film 
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40 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



May 9, 1917 



To All Legitimate Showmen 

THE FILM FIELD BECKONS YOU ! 

The motion picture field has a number of opportunities for men of legitimate theatrical experience. .Its broad dominion of sound 
business operation offers big profits to those who are trained in the fundamentals of the amusement industry. All that such men need to 
give them safety, in embarking on film investment as a sideline or exclusive enterprise, is the advice and counsel of those who have blazed 

the trail. 

THESE COMPANIES WILL HELP YOU: 

The film producers listed below are seeking every opportunity of helping outside showmen to break into films. If you have ever thought 
of doing so, write to them and they will outline to you a way that is the result of the most expert investigation, and thorough consideration 
of your particular personal needs. 



TO STATE RIGHT BUYERS 

The Universal Film Mfg. Co., 1600 Broadway, N. Y., with its special State Rights Dept is prepared to outline a plan for 
legitimate producers or theatrical men contemplating entering the State Rights Moving Picture Field. Three huge State 
Rights productions now selling. Two great LOIS WEBER productions— "GOD'S LAW"— 5 reels— and "EVEN AS 
YOU AND I" in 7 reels. Also 4 States left on "20,000 LEAGUES UNDER THE SEA" Write, wire or communicate 
in person with the State Rights Dept. for complete plans, details, terms, on these productions and get our special plans 
for the handling of State Rights Features. No time for curiosity seekers. If you mean business, get in touch with us. 
We will NOT lay our plans before any except those actually interested in buying our State Rights Productions. Men- 
tion "THE CLIPPER" when you wire or write. 

Universal Film M e fg. Co. 

STATE RIGHTS DEPT. 1600 Broacrwa?, New York City 



it 



GOD'S LAW" 

IN S REELS 

"EVEN AS YOU 
AND I" 

IN 7 REELS 



"20,000 LEAGUES 

UNDER THE SEA" 



Trained Assistance And 
Expert Advice Is Yours 

It is part of our marketing plan for the George 
Bacher Productions, including the Sin Woman and 
the Bernstein Photoplays "Who Knows" and "Seven- 
Cardinal Virtues," to assist with facts, figures, ad- 
vice and suggestions the buyer of state rights or the 
booker of showing dates. This service costs noth- 
ing and is also available to any bona-fide theatrical 
man or firm desirous of securing information or ad- 
vice concerning motion picture opportunities. 

Apply to 

M. H. HOFFMAN, Inc. 

729 SEVENTH AVE. 

NEW YORK CITY 



ASK US HOW TO HANDLE 
FILMS IN YOUR DISTRICT 

THE HANOVER FILM CO. officials will give careful attention to all 
inquiries from showmen seeking to enter the motion picture field. 
They can also help veteran buyers 




"WARFARE of THE FLESH" 

Edward Warren's Productions 1482 Broads, New York City 



State Rights 
Selling 



May 9, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



41 



NEWS 



REVIEWS 



STATE RIGHTS 



RE LEAS ES 
FORUM 



EXPERT REVEALS 
STATE RIGHTS 
COIN SECRETS 

SAYS 50 PER CENT PROFIT IS EASY 



"A profit of 50 per cent is the normal 
possibility of an ordinary investment made 
in the state rights division of film opera- 
tion." 

This declaration, coming from Maurice 
Fleckels, head of the state rights depart- 
ment of the Universal Film Co., was part 
of an interview last week with The Clip- 
per. Mr. Fleckels talked in a construc- 
tive rein, weighed bis words carefully and 
analyzed all elements of the highly inter- 
esting business in question. 

"What inducement is there for an ordi- 
narily intelligent person, with good train- 
ing in other phases of the amusement field, 
to enter state righting?" was the original 
question put to Mr. Fleckels. 

The latter approached his answer with a 
general outline of the obstacles, risks and 
conditions that characterize the field. 

"In the first place," he said, "a man 
who wishes to become buyer of territorial 
rights should have some knowledge of the 
show business. The most important first 
consideration is to know absolutely how 
many theatres he has in his territory, and, 
as closely aa possible, how much they 
can pay individually for a picture. To 
reach the latter knowledge, he should 
know the capacity of the houses, their 
past record and, in a general way, the 
neighborhood conditions surrounding them. 
It is safe to say that one-third of the 
motion picture theatres *f ordinary size 
run one feature picture three times a 
week. The price per theatre for a picture 
ranges from $25 to $100 a day, with a 
pretty definite average of $00 a day for 
the usual run of featuie productions. 

"Knowing his territory and getting a 
good approximation of the total revenue 
the theatres within it can pay, the buyer is 
fortified with a good idea of what he can 
afford to pay for the territorial rights. 
Then, he takes the vital step of buying the 
picture, with a high degree of safety. 

"To answer your questions as to what 
there is in profits for a state rights buyer, 
I should say that a man investing an 
ordinary price for state rigbtB should get 
B0 per cent, net on his investment 

"This does not mean that a man can 
take a flier on a picture, grab his 60 per 
cent and drop the business. A person en- 
tering the territorial game should enter it 
as he would any other business, with the 
idea that he is going to make it a per- 
manent enterprise. He should be ready 
to spend money generously in arranging 
his exchange service, corresponding . with 
his theatres, mapping out bis distribution 
plan for the first picture. He should ad- 
vertise well in- his district. 

"But, after all these preliminary ex- 
penses are covered, he should still make 
a good margin of profit. His next pic- 
ture, handled with equal care, should bring 
him much better results. He should aver- 
age, for himself, in the long run, 50 per 
cent profit on bis pictures. 

"Bat if a person should' lose on a pic- 
ture, he should not immediately condemn 
the business he has undertaken as a fail- 
ure. A dry goods merchant will occa- 
sionally lose on a consignment of goods, 
but he knows that bis future stocks will 
recover for him. And the dry goods mer- 
chant cannot hope to get the profits that 
some state rights buyers get very frequently 
from their pictures. 

"In the long run, the territorial handling 
of pictures is a mighty good business. 

"There are no intricacies attached to it 
that horse sense cannot reveal to a man 
quickly. In choosing a feature picture, 
a buyer should not be carried away by 
wild rumors that certain kiods of films will 
not go in certain states. It is safe to say 



that, considering the country broadly, all 
pictures will go everywhere. However, 
there will be exceptions to this rule in 
reference to certain small cities and towns, 
and in certain parts of large cities, where 
a dense local population is composed 
wholly of a particular nationality or 
class. 

"For instance, 'War Brides' will go big 
on the East Side of New York, or the 
West Side of Chicago, where teeming mul- 
titudes of foreign races live, and will not 
thrive nearly so well on the opposite sides 
of those cities wherein live the well-to-do 
people. But so far as states are concerned, 
no snch vital differences exist. 

"Such differences of public tastes as are 
attributed to the states by some film men 
are erroneous and due to the mistakes of 
exhibitors in certain sections. 

"A distributor should be careful in de- 
ciding whether to use one print or more in 
his district. In sending out several prints 
he assumes a considerable expense, but if 
his theatres are located in such a way 
as to justify it, he can do so and clean 
up the territory quickly. 

"On the other hand, a distributor can 
take as long as be chooses to cover bis 
district with a picture. A film is not 
hurt by age. After it has been running 
through a district three months it can be 
shown for a second time in the theatres 
that used it earlier. Of course, an ex- 
hibitor will not take a picture run 
previously by a competitor." 



STATE RIGHTS BUYERS IN TOWN 

Among the state rights buyers who ar- 
rived in New York during the last few 
days were: 

Charles Stevens, of Canada. 

Harry Jackson, of Minneapolis, Minn. 

Benjamin Rosenburg, of Minneapolis, 
Minn. 

C. J. Howells, of Sidney, Australia. 

Harry Siege], of Boston, Mass. 

O. J. Blanchard, of Chamberaburg, Pa. 

R. J. Oallus, of Chicago. 

H. C. Tally, of Los Angeles. 

H. H. Sherman, of Chicago. 

Louis B. Mayer, of Boston. 

R. J. Clopot, of San Francisco. 

L. F. Steadman, of Minneapolis. 

H. C. Dewees, of Vancouver. 

I>. Aaronson, of Toronto. 

R. O. Griffin, of Toronto. 



"MORMAN MAID'* GOING WELL 

That Hiller & Wilk believe in adding to 
the dramatic value of features by giving 
them publicity that equals in money the 
cost of the actual production, is proved 
by the big way in which "The Monnan 
Maid" is being handled. Since the trade 
showing of this feature, a consistent cam- 
paign has been conducted to popularize 
the production, and it has resulted in secur- 
ing an enormous amount of publicity of a 
nature that has aroused keen interest. 
The intrinsic value of this campaign is 
indicated by the success that is attending 
the presentation of the picture at the 
Park Theatre in New York City. 



LEWIS DENIES COST REPORT 

Edgar Lewis, producer of "The Bar 
Sinister," issued a denial last week of 
the report that this feature had cost but 
$17,000 to make. Mr. Lewis mentioned 
several details of cost showing that the 
production actually entailed a vastly higher 
expense. He also said that the price re- 
ceived for the world rights came to con- 
siderably over the $]<V3000 mentioned in 
the printed report. "The Bar Sinister" 
has received universal praise from critics 
and dealers in films. 



FILM MEN OFFER 
TO HELP BRING 
IN NEWBL00D 

WOULD ADVISE SHOWMEN 



A half dozen representative film pro- 
ducers talked encouragingly last week, in 
response to inquiries from TEE Clipper, 
of the condition of the state rights field. 
They all subscribed to the belief that this 
division of the industry has broadened tre- 
mendously, and invite "new blood" into it, 
with room for all. 

In material testimony to this belief, they 
offered to provide special information 
service for all legitimate showmen who 
seek to enter the film business. 

W. A. Bach, sales manager of the M. H. 
Hoffman Co., and Captain Kimball, of the 
Hanover Film Co., were among those who 
talked in that manner. 

"Some systematized method of giving a 
helping hand to legitimate showmen, to 
guide them in undertaking an enterprise in 
films would be a godsend to the industry," 
said Captain Kimball. "Distributors and 
exhibitors of films have come in the past 
almost exclusively from the other branches 
of the amusement field. It is only natural 
that this should be so. Owners of show 
houses are logical investors in films." 

The captain asserted it would be easy to 
reveal to showmen contemplating a venture 
in pictures, the few fundamental facts 
necessary for their guidance. If film men. 
equipped with long experience in blazing 
the trail, would extend this information, 
lie argued, the industry would be greatly 
benefited, fewer failures would occur, 
films would be distributed more effectively 
and the public would be better served. 

The Hanover Film Co. is completing ar- 
mngeroents to lend its picture "How 
Uncle Sam Prepares" to the Government in 
certain sections for recruiting purposes. 
The picture has received glowing indorse- 
ment from officials of the War Depart- 
ment. 

Mr. Bach contributed the assertion that 
better feature pictures were being made 
every month, and that the exhibitors and 
public were becoming insatiate in their 
demand for productions of the magnitude 
and merit that are offered in the state 
rights field. 

Another producer, who did not wish to 
he quoted, declared that certain evil prac- 
tices that existed in the open market are 
being wiped out. He mentioned the fact 
that the trick of "framing up" a buyer 
and then taking his picture awsy from 
him on breach of contract charges has 
become virtually a thing of the past. He 
asserted it was common in the past for 
the national distributor to Bell state rights, 
then send spies to inveigle the buyer to 
rent his recently bought print to a theatre 
outside his territory. When a buyer did 
this, of course, he forfeited his riirhts to 
the picture. 



HOFFMAN SELLS WESTERN RIGHTS 

The M. H. Hoffman Film Co. last week 
sold the rights for "The Sin Woman," "Who 
Knows" and "The Seven Cardinal Vir- 
tues" for all Western States. The bnyer 
was the Supreme Photoplays Co. Mr. 
Hoffman, who personally closed the deal, 
is on his way east. W. A. Bach, sales 
manager, is negotiating sales for eastern 
territory. 



HALL TO DISTRIBUTE FILM 

Despite reports to the contrary, Abrams 
& Werner, distributors of feature films, 
announce they have nothing to. do with the 
distribution of "The Bar Sinister." Frank 
G. Han-; of Newark, who bought the world 
rights to the film, has established head- 
quarters in the longacre Building, and will 
dispose of the film himself. 



LEWIS PLANS NEW FILMS 

Edgar Lewis, who recently released the 
first picture under his management, "The 
Bar Sinister," is completing preparations 
for the production of another feature. 
Mitchell Lewis, who appeared under Edgar 
Lewis in "The Barrier" and "The Bar 
Sinister," is cast for the new production. 



WIDE RANGE SEEN 
IN FEATURE FILMS 
FOR STATE RIGHTERS 

The names and addresses, of feature film 
producers and titles of their current and 
pending releases that are especially suit- 
able for State Rights exploitation are aa 
follows: 

Corona Cinema Co., Los Angeles, OaL — 
•The Curse of Eve." 

Hiller & Wilk, Inc., Longacre Build- 
ing, New York City — "The Battle of 
Gettysburg," "The Wrath of the Gods." 

Ivan Film Productions, ISO West 46th 
Street, New York City — "One Law for 
Both." 

A. Kay Co., 720 Seventh avenue, New 
York City — "Terry Feature Burlesque," 
"Terry Human Interest Reel," "Golden 
Spoon Mary." 

Today Feature Film Corp., 1564 Broad- 
way, New York City — "Today." 

Gold Medal Pbotoplayers, 729 Seventh 
avenue. New York City — "The Web of 
Life." 

Cinema War News Syndicate, Longacre 
Building. New York City — "American 
War News Serial." 

Cines Film Co., 130 West 45th Street, 
New York City— "The Fated Hour." 

Sherlott Picture Corp., 218 West 42d 
Street, New York City— "The Black 
Stork." 

Max Cohen Co., 729 Seventh avenue. 
New York City— "The Fury of Civiliza- 
tion," "America Is Ready." 

Edward Warren Productions, 1482 
Broadway, New York City— "The Warfare 
of the Flesh.". 

Interocean Film Corp., 220 West 42d 
Street, New York City — "The Manxman." 

M. H. Hoffman Co., 729 Seventh ave- 
nue, New York City— "The Sin Woman," 
"Who Knows?" and "The Seven Cardinal 
Virtues." 

Popular Pictures Corp., 218 West 42d 
Street. New York City— "A Woman Wills." 
"The Princess of India." "The Burglar and 
the Lady," "The Little Orphan" and 
"Ignorance." 

Frobman Amusement Corp., Times 
Building, New York City— "God's Man." 

Arrow Film Corp., Times Bldg.. New 
York City — "The Deemster." 

De Luxe Spoilers Co., 729 Seventh ave- 
nue, "The (De Luxe) Spoilers." 

Balboa Amusement Producing Co., 1600 
Broadway, New York City — "The Twisted 
Thread." 

Graphic Features, 220 West 42d Street, 
New York City — "The Woman and the 
Beast." 

Frank G. Hall Productions. Inc.. Long- 
acre Building. New York City— "The Bar 
Sinister." 

E. I. 8. Motion Picture Corp.. 203 West 
40th Street, New York Citv— "Trooper 
44." 

Sol L. Lesser, Longacre Building, New 
York City — "The Ne'er-Do-Well." 

Grand Feature Film Company. 220 
West 42nd Street. New York City— "Rex 
Beach Himself." 

Enlightenment Photoplays Corp., 220 
West 42d Street. New York City— "En- 
lighten Thy Daughter." 

Hanover Film Co., Columbia Theatre 
Building, New York City — "How Uncle 
Sam Prepares." 

Ultra Picture Corp., 729 Seventh Ave- 
nue, New York City — "The Woman Who 
Dared." 

Flora Finch Comedy Films Corp., 729 
Seventh Avenue, New York City — "War 
Prides." 

Variety Films. 128 West 46th Street, 
New York City— "The Price of Her Soul." 

Eugenic Film Co.. 220 West 42nd Street, 
New York City— "Birth." 

Williamson Bros., Longacre Building, 
New York City, "The Submarine Eye." 

Sherman-Elliott, Inc., 218 West 42nd 
street. New York City— "The Crista." 

Universal Film Co., 1600 Broadway. 
New York City— "God's Law," and "20,000 
Leagues Under the Sea." 

Benjamin Chapin Studios. Ridgefield 
Park, N. J.— "The Lincoln Cycle." 



42 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



May 9, 1917 



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Chicago. 
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MUSIC COMPOSED. ARRANGED. 
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SCENERY AND SCENIC PAINTERS. . 

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Wis. 

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VENTRILOQUIST FIGURES. 
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Phone Bryant 4«3Z 

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PIANO. ORCHESTRA. Melodies written t* 
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May 9, 1917 


THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 


43 


■ eJEAlM SARA ■ 

I DE LISLE I VERNON ! 


■ 




■ 


\ - • ' 

■-'■■■■ V ife€^®S^4- 






■ lsf : i : ;'l pH ■: Kit' ' 

- ■' ''"■■■,-:" . ■■ *v>- '• 




j In Son; 

* 

I Direotioi 


U Moments of Different 

What E. W., of the "Clipper," Said of Our Act: 

"Jean De Lisle and Sara Vernon do a sister turn somewhat 
different from the usual run. They start in the regulation sou- 
brette dress singing a duet. Then follow a single by one of the 
team, with an Italian song. Her partner then appears as a Dutch 
emigrant girl and does a yodeling song and wooden shoe dance. 
They finished dressed as cow-girls, doing an appropriate song and 
dance and scored a hit." 

n FRANK 


Lands" j 

EVANS I 



THE TECHNICAL PKESS, HEW YOIIC 



SOPHIE TUCKER 

Who Has Done More To Popularize "Regret" Songs 
Than Any Other Vaudeville Headliner 

Has returned to New York, after making all parts of the country sit up and take notice. She is at the Riverside Theatre 
— right now — singing what she acknowledges to be one of the greatest song vehicles that ever 

illuminated her road to universal popularity. 

I AIN'T GOT NOBODY MUCH 

AND NOBODY CARES FOR ME 

If you and your audiences like the kind of a song Sophie likes — the kind that thrills you with "pleasure-pain" so that you don't know 
whether you should shout for joy or weep in sadness — you'll take the hint and connect with this exceptional success 

at once. Yes, ifs orchestrated in all keys, including yours 

What's your favorite Hawaiian song? It makes no difference -whether you have or haven't any, because you're bound to find the thing 

that makes you like "Hula Melodies" in 

AT THAT CABARET IN HONOLULU TOWN 



Words and Music by JACK FROST 
A NOVELTY SONG, IF THERE EVER WAS ONE 



A SONG THAT CHALLENGES PRAISE 

WHEN SHADOWS FALL 

(By FROST AND KEITHLEY) 
THE BALLAD EXQUISITE— NOT ONLY FOR TODAY— NOT ONLY FOR TOMORROW— BUT FOR ALL TIME 

We note with satisfaction that girl shows— elaborate revues — will form the chief attractions for the summer amusement season. All 

the cafes, all the gardens and most of the tented enterprises will feature productions embracing pretty girls, clever 

dancers and singers who know how to use their voices. This means that, no matter where you go for 

your entertainment this summer, you're bound to hear the never-failing first choice 

of musical show producers 

MY FOX-TROT GIRL 

Lyric by JACK FROST Music by PAUL BIESE and F. HENRI KLICKM ANN 

THIS IS THE NUMBER WITH THE DREAMY, DOUBLE-BEAT MELODY AND THE EASILY-MASTERED LYRIC 

SPECIAL AJVNOUNCEMENT 

We have a bis surprise up our sleeve which we don't feel at liberty to divulge, as yet. Ifs a song, of course, but not the ordinary kind. 
Watch our future advertisements, if you're interested in an extraordinary novelty number written under exceptional conditions for a 
definite purpose. 

OUR NEW NEW YORK OFFICE 

in the Exchange BIdg., 145 W. 45th St, — in the heart of die professional district — was opened for YOU — so be sure you visit it. You'll 
find a bunch of good songs and a competent staff on hand to make you feel at home. 

Coh,,, '* G ™mc5So HoTOeBI, " t - THE McKINLEY MUSIC CO. %£-££ 




Wfa NEW YORK 




in ii 



THE OLDEST THEATRICAL PUBLICATION IN AMERICA 
in im iif in tij ji iri u» mm m nn m m m m 




THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



May 16, 1917 



lucia" 



Never received more applause than any one of the individual numbers in this 

WONDERFUL SEXTET OF SONGS 



ALL 
THE 



I 



I 



WILL 



JEALOUS 



OF 

ME 



Proclaimed by everybody the most singable and best "popular" melody the world famous composer ERNEST R. BALL has ever written, with a lyric by AL. 

DUBIN that just registers a "home run hit" every time it is sung. 



SOMEWHERE 



IRELAND 



ERNEST R. BALL and J. KEIRN BRENNAN, the writer, of LITTLE BIT OF HEAVEN, SHURE THEY CALLED IT IRELAND; TURN BACK THE UNIVERSE 

AND GIVE ME YESTERDAY; BOODBYE, GOOD LUCK, GOD BLESS YOU, and dozens of others, never turned out a better song. It is a bright 

lilty 2/4 number, and while entirely of a different character, it is bound to be as big a hit as any of their former great successes. 




It's a long time since there's been a good yiddisha song on the market here's a gem originally introduced by WILLIE HOWARD, OF THE HOWARD 

BROTHERS, at the Winter Garden, New York. It was a riot from the start. A lot of good comedy verses by AL. DUBIN, and strange to 

say, the melody by JOSEPH A. BURKE for a song of this kind, is beautiful. 




WALTER DONALDSON'S novelty melodies are too well known to require further comment. This is one of his best. While the lyric by MONTY C. BRICE is 

just chuck full of up-to-date comedy rube ideas, each and everyone of them a laugh. 



SUKI SA 



Where the Cherry 
Blossoms Fall 



Still another novelty song by WALTER DONALDSON. 



This time Japanese. A delightfully charming melody, and the lyric by J. KEIRN BRENNAN is just brimful 
of atmosphere. A great number for production. 




This beautiful ballad is now being sung all over the English-speaking world. It grew slowly, surely, but solidly into one of the greatest vocal successes ever 
published. A natural harmony number, and simply wonderful, not alone for solos, but for duets, trios and quartets. By STODDARD KING & ZO ELLIOTT. 

And besides these there are a few others that you might be interested in. "I'VE GOT THE SWEETEST GIRL IN MARY- 
LAND"; " 'TWAS ONLY AN IRISHMAN'S DREAM"; "WHEN IT'S CIRCUS DAY BACK HOME"; "FOR DIXIE AND UNCLE 
SAM"; "YOU'LL BE THERE," and the wonderful march ballad, "GOOD-BYE LITTLE GIRL, GOOD-BYE, revived by univer- 



sal request. 



ORCHESTRATIONS AND PROFESSIONAL COPIES IN ALL KEYS 



CHICAGO 



SAN FRANCISCO CHICAGO M . WitlTiark & SOIlS PHILADELPHIA BOSTON 

Pant^ce* Building Schiller Building Uptown Prof. ROOmS, AL. COOK, Mgr. 1021 Chestnut St. 218 Tremont St. 

■ AL. BROWNE, Mgr- TOM QUIGLEY, Mgr. 1562 Broadway, Next to Palace Theatre ED. EDWARDS, Mgr. JACK LAHEY, Mgr. 



fantapes Buildir 



Copyright, 1917, by the Clipper Corporation. 



Founded by 
FRANK QUEEN. 



18S3. 



NEW YORK. MAY 16, 1917 



VOLUME LXV— No. IS 
Price, Ten Centi 



EXPECT FIGHT 

OVER RATS 

CHARTER 

EQUITY AND UNION WANT IT 

Unless one side or the other backs down, 
there will be a battle royal for the charter 
held by the White Rats in the American 
Federation of Labor, with the Actors' 
Equity Association on one side and the 
Actors' International Union headed by 
Harry De Veanx on the other. Since the 
suspension of operations on the part of the 
White Rats, Howard Kyle, of the Equity 
Association, and De Veanx, have been 
angling for a line as to how they may be 
able to get hold of the charter which each 
organization has been seeking. 

The Actors' Equity Union made an ap- 
plication for a charter to the American 
Federation of Labor last July. At that 
time the matter was taken under consid- 
eration and, at the convention of the Fed- 
eration held in Baltimore several months 
ago, it was decided that the White Rats 
held the charter privilege for the the- 
atrical field and that any theatrical body 
wishing the protection of the A. F. of L. 
should take the matter np with them. 

Harry De Veanx, who heads the Inter- 
national Actors' Union, has been at log- 
gerheads with Harry Mountford who was 
international executive of the White Rats 
and upon several occasions made efforts to 
have the White Rat charter taken away 
and given to his organization. At the 
last convention of the Federation in Bal- 
timore he made a hard fight to obtain 
recognition for bis organization, but was 
unable to obtain the charter. 

De Veanx is under the impression that 
the charter should be granted to the com- 
bined theatrical societies, of which he de- 
sires the Actors' International Union to 
be the head. He wants the Actors' Equity 
Association, the German Actors, the 
Motion Picture Actors and the Hebrew 
Actors to come into this combination. If 
he can accomplish this, it is quite likely 
that he will be the head of the new organ- 
ization in the capacity of International 
President. 

He anticipates that President Gompers 
will shortly call a conference of the vari- 
ous organizations to bring about an under- 
standing among them regarding a new 
national theatrical body which might be 
created. He expects this to take place 
as soon as the Federation has conducted 
an investigation into the White Rats af- 
fairs and the charter, is returned to the 
parent organization. 

The Actors' Equity people feel that they 
should have an individual charter for their 
organization, as they have fought their 
battles alone and what results they have 
accomplished have been done without the 
assistance of other theatrical organizations. 
They claim that recently they have had 
several conferences with the theatrical 
managers and that they have agreed upon 
a form of contract that will be satisfactory 
to both the manager and the actor. 

The Actors' Equity Association will 
hold their annual meeting at the Hotel 
Astor on May 28, when the matter will be 
laid before the members. 



GERRY SOCIETY WATCHING ACT 

The vaudeville act known as "The 
Alexander Kids," now playing at Proc- 
tor's Theatre, Yonkers, ia being investi- 
gated by Mayor James T. Lennon of that 
city at the instigation of the Society for 
the Prevention of Cruelty to Children. 
Lennon intimates that he will demand 
that the youngest of the three children, 
who is five years old, be taken out of 
the act The New York City branch of 
the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty 
to Children state that the children will 
not be allowed to sing or dance here.. 

ACTOR CHARGED WITH LARCENY 

Newark, N. J., May 14. — Andrew Tria- 
ble, one of the team of negroes presenting 
the skit "Dark Spots of Joy," in which 
he impersonates a woman, was held for 
extradition to Washington last week on 
the charge of grand larceny, made by a 
woman, who alleges he stole her wardrobe 
to equip himself for his stage impersona- 
tions. The act appeared at Proctor's 
Palace the first half of last week. 



MANAGERS IN 

WASHINGTON, 

FIGHTTAX 

ALL AMUSEMENTS REPRESENTED 



DANCER IN HOSPITAL 

J. Sheldon, formerly known as Sheldon 
DuPont, a dancer with the Evan-Burrows 
Fontaine act, playing at the Palace The- 
atre this week, was removed to Bellevue 
Hospital last Friday, suffering with pneu- 
monia. His condition is said to be seri- 
ous. Tom Rector took bis place in the act. 

"DIVORCED," SAYS SARANOFF 

Joseph Saranoff announces that his wife, 
professionally known as "Ruth Randell," 
while appearing in "Betty," in Chicago 
last month, spent her leisure time in the 
courts obtaining a divorce. 

ITS SEARCY JR. NOW 
Jack Noble, of the team of Searcy and 
Noble, who were with the "Darling of 
Paris" company this season, reports the 
arrival at the Noble home in Hartford, 
Conn., on May 10th, of Jack, Jr., a bounc- 
ing eight and one-half pound baby. 



PARISIAN BOOKER HERE 

Roger Tolomei, general manager of the 
Paris office of the South American Tours, 
Ltd., arrived in New York from Cuba last 
week. He will stay here a short while, 
booking American attractions through the 
office of Richard Pi trot. 



JOFFRE DELAYED MATINEES 

Boston, May 14. — All matinees were 
postponed half an hour on account of 
the big parade and demonstration for Gen- 
eral Joffre and bis party, when they vis- 
ited Boston Saturday. 



FIELDS TO DIRECT AT CENTURY 

Besides being one of the star comedians 
in Dillingham & Ziegfeld'a next season's 
Century Theatre show. Lew Fields will act 
as advisory director of the comedy features 
to be introduced. 



WILLIAMS TO BUY ISLAND 

Percy Williams is negotiating for the 
purchase of one of the Thousand Island 
Group of islands for the purpose of pre- 
senting it to bis son Harold. 



Washington, D. C. May 15.— With 
practically every section of the amuse- 
ment business represented, from baseball 
to the circus and carnival business, Wash- 
ington ia filled with prominent theatrical 
managers, motion picture producers, pic- 
ture theatre owners, circus and carnival 
owners, who appeared at a meeting of the 
Senate Finance Committee in opposition 
to the proposed 10 per cent, tax on all 
tickets to theatres and similar places of 
amusement, during the duration of the 
war. 

Among some of those present at the 
hearing are William A. Brady, R. H. 
Burnside, J. H. Rhinock, Marc Elaw, Lee 
Ochs, John M. Kelly, Ex-Governor Tener 
of Pennsylvania, Maurice Goodman, W. 
S. Sheehen, L. J. Selznick, Sam Trigger. 
Bruce Edwards and Frank Spellman. 

The hearings" on the proposed tax have 
been going on since Saturday, and dur- 
ing that time various representatives of 
the theatrical concerns have appeared be- 
fore the committee and explained their 
reasons for opposition against a flat 10 
per cent, tax schedule. Among those who 
have spoken were William A. Brady, rep- 
resenting the National Association of the 
Motion Picture Industry ; Ligon John- 
son, who spoke on behalf of the United 
Theatrical Managers' Protective Asso- 
ciation ; John M. Kelly, who represented 
the Ringling Bros., and Barnum &. Bailey 
Circus, and Lee Ochs, who represented 
the Motion Picture Exhibitors' League 
of America. It is expected the hearing 
will continue the greater part of the week 
as a score of speakers are yet to be 
heard in opposition to the measure. 

A point brought out by Mr. Johnson 
was that, as long as the general amuse- 
ment field was to be taxed, he could not 
see why the cabaret establishments should 
be immune from taxation. He stated 
that the United States Supreme Court 
in a recent decision held that they were 
giving performances for profit. 

He stated that the theatres were not 
against paying their share of the taxa- 
tion, but that it should be equally dis- 
tributed among all enterprises conducted 
for profit in the amusement class, includ- 
ing the cabarets. He said that if the 
cabarets were to pay their fair share of 
the tax the proposed 10 per cent, tax 
on the theatres and motion picture houses 
could be cut in half. He suggested that 
the tax be collected by putting a per- 
centage tax on all moneys paid for food 
and drinks in these establishments. 

In his .speech, Mr. Johnson also sug- 
gested that the persons who were ad- 
mitted to theatres on free passes be 
charged a tax double the amount of that 
charged the patron who pays. The bill, 
(Continued on page 4.) 



RATS CLUBHOUSE TRANSFERRED 

ft. E. J. Corcoran, the Columbia Trust 
Ob. clerk who obtained the leasehold of 
the White Rats Clubhouse, through a 
sale from the White Rats Realty Co., 
transferred these holdings to the "229 
West Forty-sixth Street Corporation" 
last week. This corporation filed papers 
of incorporation in the office of the Sec- 
retary of State in Albany, and gave the 
following persons as the incorporators: 
Jos. Lorenz, Edward Roeder and James 
Gru. The corporation is capitalized at 
$5,000 and the papers of the corporation 
permit them to transact a realty busi- 
ness. 

Bloomberg & Bloomberg, who are the at- 
torneys for the purchasers, stated that 
the incorporators were not the actual pur- 
chasers of the property. They stated that 
their clients at this time did not desire 
their identity revealed. When asked as 
to the future of the clubhouse under its 
new ownership, the attorneys stated that 
the premises were only adaptable for a 
hotel or club. 



NOTICE TO ENLISTING ACTORS 

The New York Clipper will keep a record of all members of the theatrical pro- 
fession enlisting for war and will forward all mail addressed in care of the paper. 
Friends may obtain information at The Clipper office concerning theatrical enlisters. 



"FRIENDSHIP" DELAYED 

Harry Mesteyer and company were sup- 
posed to have been part of the bill at the 
Palace Theatre this week, with the Friar 
Frolic playlet "Friendship," written by 
Eugene Walter. Louis Dresser and com- 
pany appeared instead, with a playlet en- 
titled "For Country." 

It was stated by the managers of the 
playlet that nothing, as far as vaudeville 
was concerned, had occurred, and although 
the act was supposed to play in the two-a- 
day, it had now been definitely settled that 
it would not appear there this season. 
Negotiations are pending to use the act 
as a curtain raiser to "The Brat," and a 
bid has been made for it by the Nora 
Bayes management, who desire to use it 
as part of the performance now being 
given at the Thirty-ninth Street Theatre. 



"TOBY'S VOW IS COMING 

Winchell Smith and John L. Golden 
decided on Monday to give an immediate 
production of "Toby's Vow," a new com- 
edy by John Taintcr Footc, which they 
have just secured. A company will be 
engaged at once and rehearsals will begin 
before the end of this week, while the first 
production will occur June 8 at Stamford, 
Conn. 



"FLORODORA" GIRL MARRIES 
Hutchinson, Kan., May 9. — H. 8. 
Brummell and Frances Davies were mar- 
ried here last Wednesday. They are mem- 
bers of the Stanley Edwards Musical Stock 
now playing this city. Mrs. Brummell was 
at one time a member of the Floradora 
Sextette. 



THEATRE TREASURER ENLISTS 

Albany, N. Y„ May 14. — Robert Gra- 
ham, assistant treasurer of Harmanua 
Bleecker Hall, has enlisted in Dr. £11102*8 
base hospital company, of Albany, N. Y., 
and expects to leave for France for duty. 



VETERAN MANAGER CELEBRATES 

Boston. May 14. — John B. Schoeffel, the 
veteran manager, celebrated the seventy- 
first anniversary of his birth yesterday. 
He is one of the oldest active theatrical 
managers in the United States. 



TABARIN GIRLS BOOKED SOLID 

Ashland, Ivy., May 9. — Dave Newman's 
Tabarin Girls Co. is playing the Sun Time. 
It is booked solid until July 4. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



May 16, 1917 



STAGE HANDS 

HOLD BIG 

ELECTION 

McKENN A WINS PRESIDENCY 

The annual election of Theatrical Pro- 
tective Union No. 1, affiliated with the 
International Alliance of Theatrical 
Stage Employees, waa held in the New 
Amsterdam Hall on Sunday afternoon. 
Out of a membership of 1,000 members, 
there were 538 in attendance, making this 
the largest attended meeting in the history 
of the loeaL 

For several hours before the meeting 
was called to order the various candidates 
and their workars were "electioneering" 
about the Ml There was considerable 
rivalry existing between E. P. Gately and 
T. J. McKenna, the candidates for presi- 
dent. They and their workers had been 
electioneering for tie past two weeks, and 
did not let op until the ballots were dis- 
tributed for voting. When the count was 
taken, McKenna obtained 294 vote* to 
209 cast for Gately. 

W. S. Davis easily defeated J. C. Mc- 
Donald for the vice-preaidency by a vote 
of 320 to 183. Harry L. Abbott was 
re-elected secretary-business agent, with- 
out any opposition, there being no candi- 
date in the Geld. 

Harry P alme r was re-elected business 
agent over William E. Monroe by a vote 
of 307 to 210. E. H. Convey had an 
easy time for re-election as financial sec- 
retary-treasurer, defeating W. Timoney by 
a vote of 405 to 107. James Tracey was 
elected to the office of sergeant-at-arms 
without opposition. 

Three out of a field of five were chosen 
as members of the executive board. They 
were: J. L. Meeker, the retiring president 
of the organization ; Tom Burke and W. 
Bass. The defeated candidates were W. E. 
Dning and M. Kelly. 

J. Tiemey was elected trustee over C. S. 
Murphy, whom he defeated by a margin of 
twenty-five votes. 

By a vote of 268 to 230, T. J. Mc- 
Kenna defeated H. L. Abbott for the posi- 
tion of delegate to the State convention 
of the American Federation of Labor. 



■SHOW OF WONDERS" IN CHICAGO 

Chicago. May 16. — The Show of 
Wonders," the Shnberta* latest Winter 
Garden offering in Chicago, opens to-night 
at the Garrick. George Monroe, Howard 
Bros.. Marilynn Miller, Walter C Kelley. 
Grace Fisher. Sydney Phillips, Jack 
Googan. White * Clayton, Eugene 
CRourke. Dan Quinlan, Adele Ardsley, 
Alexis Kosloff. Edmund Mulcahy, James 
Grant. Virginia Smith, Eleanor Brown. 
Myrtle Victorine are in the cast. 



GET PLAY FOR Rn.I.lF. BURKE 

F. Ziegfeld announced yesterday that he 
had arranged with Arthur Hopkins to 
star BiTile Burke next season under their 
joint management in a play by Clara 
Kummer. The title for the play has not 
yet been decided upon. 

"HTTCHY-KOO" OPENING SET 

"Hitchy-Koo," the new Raymond Hitch- 
cock entertainment to be seen in New 
York this summer, will be given its first 
production May 28 at Atlantic City. 

CORT SIGNS EDITH TALIAFERRO 
Edith Taliaferro has signed with John 
Cort to play the role of Nancy in "Mother 
Carey's Chickens," which will be seen at 
the Cort Theatre in September. 

EDITH HALLOR IN 'TOLLIES" 

Edith Hallor was engaged by F. Zieg- 
feld on Monday for the new "Follies" 
soon to be seen on the Amsterdam Roof. 



INVESTIGATE MANAGER'S DEATH 

An innnft was held yesterday in the 
Coroner's Court, Brooklyn, by Coroner 
Senior, to determine the cause of death 
of Maximilian Rosen-Riase, a motion pic- 
ture actor and former theatrical manager, 
who died last week in the Brooklyn State 
Hospital for the Insane. The inquest was 
conducted at the instigation of Ernest 
Sosen-Bisae, a son, who informed the Cor- 
oner that, prior to the death of his father 
be had complained of having been severely 
beaten by attendants at the hospital. The 
deceased was formerly associated with 
Reginald De Koven and Klaw & Er- 
langer. He waa fifty-five years old, and 
his home waa at 31 Bay Twenty-ninth 
Street. Bensonhurst, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



MOUNTFORD AIDE JOINS NAVY 
A. I.Jward Boas, formerly private sec- 
retary to Harry Monntford, late inter- 
national executive of the White Bats, is 
still keen for fighting, for he has enlisted 
in the Naval Reserve, and is graded as 
chief yeoman, attached to the office of 
Commander Patton in the New York dis- 
trict. He requests that bis friends be in- 
formed that he passed his examination with 
a qualification of 100 per cent, both 
mentally and physically. 



COL. JOHN BRAGG DIES 

Boston, May 14. — CoL John Bragg, 
who for many years has been interested in 
theatrical productions, died suddenly last 
Sbnxsday from apoplexy at his home in 
Sberbnrn, a suburb of Boston. The colonel 
and his wife, an actress, reached New 
York the first of the month after a tour 
of the Sonth, where they had been en- 
gaged in producing a fantasy. He came 
to Sberbnrn a day or two later, leaving 
his wife in New York. 



MUSICAL GIRLS CO. TO TOUR 

Saskatoon, Can., May 12. — Smith and 
Hamilton's Musical Girls will close their 
seventh week at the Strand Theatre here 
to-night, and will go on the road present- 
ing musical comedy in Saskatchewan, 
Manitoba and Alberta. The company has 
been recently strengthened by the addition 
of Bene La Vera, Doris Clifford and 
Gordon Clarke. Mr. Clarke is a dancer and 
is featured with Miss Clarice Groves. 



SALVATION ARMY TAKES THEATRE 

PimimTTini, May 11. — The Park The- 
atre was taken possession of last week 
by the Salvation Army as its central bar- 
racks. The house was bought last year 
by John Wanamaker, who expended $50,- 
000 in remodeling it for the naes of the 
Army. It is understood that Mr. Wana- 
maker intends presenting the building to 
the Salvation Army. It represents an out- 
lay of S200.000. ' 



MAY ABANDON COLORED THEATRE 

PmLADELFHiA. May 11. — The project of 
the Quality Amusement Co. of New York 
to build a theatre at Broad and Lombard 
streets, exclusively for colored patronage, 
seems to have fallen through. Title rn 
the property has already passed to the com- 
pany, but it is said that inability to finance 
the erection of the theatre will probably 
cause the abandonment of the enterprise. 



"LURE OF ALASKA" IN SASKATOON 

Saskatoon. Can.. May 12. — "The Lure 
of Alaska." a travelogue presented by Dr. 
Sugden. lecturer, formerly government 
pilot in the White Horse Pass, was pre- 
sented at -the Empire Theatre here the 
latter half of this week. 



ACTRESS SUED FOR DIVORCE 

Marie Poesner. better known in vaude- 
ville and in films as Marie Paris, is being 
sued for divorce by her husband. John W. 
Murray. 



CHARLOTTE OPENS IN CABARET 

Chicago. May 15. — Terrace Garden, in 
the New Morrison Hotel, opens to-night 
with Charlotte, the Danish ice skater. 



BELASC0 WILL 

WRITE MACK 

PLAYJJVER 

WOODS WINS INJUNCTION SUIT 



Following the decision of ex-Judge E. 
Henry Lacombe, appointed referee in the 
action brought by A. H. Woods against 
David Belasco and Willard Mack, in which 
he granted an injunction, restraining Be- 
lasco from producing any plays written by 
Mack, or the latter writing for any one 
but Woods, during the term of a contract 
now in existence, Belasco, on Saturday 
night, ended the engagement of "The Tiger 
Rose," a play in which he and Mack had 
collaborated, at Ford's Theatre, Baltimore. 
The contract on which this suit was 
founded was entered into between Woods 
and Mack on November 5, 1915, and had 
five years to run from that date. 

In rendering his decision Judge Lacombe 
stated: 

"Of course, he (Belasco), is entitled to 
produce the product of his own work. If 
the defendant (Belasco), can rewrite the 
play himself or ca n find some one else to 
do it in such a way as to eliminate Mack's 
contributions, he may do so." 

This suggestion is to be acted upon by 
Mr. Belasco and, upon bis return to New 
York this week he will immediately main* 
arrangements to have the piece rewritten. 
He expects that an entirely new script. 
with the Mack material eliminated will be 
furnished him by the fore part of August 
so that he will be able to produce the 
play again early in the Fall. 

In reference to the production of "Alias 
Santa Clans," of which Mack supplied rbe 
dramatic version to Belasco, it was shown 
that Mr. Belasco had contracted with 
Mack to write this play on October 26. 
1815, which was prior to the execution 
of the contract between Woods and Mack. 
The Court, therefore, held that Woods was 
entitled to no relief in this direction. 

It is claimed by Mr. Belasco that, even 
though Mack can furnish bim with no 
play material, he can employ him in an 
acting capacity, and that be will probably 
appear in the rewritten "Tiger Rose" with 
Leonore TJlrich, who win be starred. 

House, Grossman & Vorhaua were the 
attorneys for Woods, in the action, and 
Irving Dittenhoefer represented Belasco. 



PLAN TO HONOR GROVER 

Leonard Grover, a dominating figure in 
Brooklyn's grand opera and drama, will 
be tendered a jubilee testimonial on Sun- 
day, May 27, at the Majestic Theatre, 
Brooklyn. Among the members of the 
committee in charge are: Enrico Caruso, 
Daniel Frohman. George C. Tyler, F. F. 
Mackay. John Drew, George M. Cohan. 
George H. Nicolai, Herbert Kelcey, James 
O'Neal, Lew Dockstader, Steney Drew, 
Henry E. Dixey, Ralph Delmore. Julian 
Eltinge, John E. Kellerd. Ralph W. Ince, 
.Tames Mclntyre. Harry T. Morey, Robert 
HiUiard, John Mason, Willis P. Sweatnam, 
Lionel Barrymore, H. F. Kensey, Francis 
X. Bushman, Tom Heath. John Ryan and 
Burr Mcintosh. 

Melville E. Stone, president of the Asso- 
ciated Press, is aso a member of the com- 
mittee and Edward E. Trail la treasurer. 



MRS. FISKE CLOSES SEASON 
St. Paul. May 14. — Mrs. Fiske dosed 
her season in "Erstwhile Susan" Satur- 
day night here. 



BRAUN JOINS HITCHCOCK SHOW 

Terse Hatjte. Ind.. May 12. — C. E. 
Braun. of this city, has joined the Ray- 
mond Hitchcock company in "Betty." 



MRS. BERT KALMAR HURT 

Mrs. Bert Kalmar (Jessica Brown), of 
Kalmar & Brokn, who are appearing at 
the Alhambra Theatre this week, was 
badly shaken up as the result of an auto- 
mobile collision on Sunday night when 
she was driving at Freeport, L. I. An- 
other car ran into hers. 

Mrs. Kalmar was on her way to a 
motion picture theatre with her two-year- 
old daughter, when an automobile coming 
along the road ran into the' aide of the 
car, throwing her and the child to the 
bottom of the machine. A physician who 
was going by at the time attended Mrs. 
Kalmar. and removed her to . her home. 
The child was not injured. 



$50,000 ASKED FOR PLAY 

Summonses have been served on Lee 
Morrison, playwright, and the Daniels 
Amusement Company, of Brooklyn, at the 
instance of the Punch and Judy Theatre 
Company, asking for damages amounting 
to $50,000. 

The suit is being brought over a produc- 
tion of "Treasure Island," which waa pre- 
sented at the Grand Opera House, Brook- 
lyn, during the week of April 22. The 
play, as there presented, was from the 
pen of Lee Morrison. Another version, 
written by Jules Eckert Goodman, ran 
for three seasons at the Punch and Jndy 
Theatre in this city, and is now on tour. 

In the complaint, which has not yet been 
filed, the plaintiff will probably allege that 
it has the only rights to produce "Treasure 
Island," although the defendants will 
probably contend that the copyright on 
Robert Louis Stevenson's story has ex- 
pired, and that any one can now lawfully 
make a version of it. 



ACTORS' ELECTION TUESDAY 

The Actors' Fund of America will hold 
its '"""'l meeting for the election of of- 
ficers next Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock 
at the Hudson Theatre. All members in 
good standing are requested to attend and 
take part in the election and transaction 
of business. Non-members and their 
friends are also invited. 



"PROPS" GRANTED DIVORCE 

Louis J. Schwartz, property man of 
Loew's American Theatre, has received an 
absolute decree of divorce from bis wife, 
known on the stage as Rose Beck. The 
decree was granted by Justice Lehman, of 
the Supreme Court of New York. 



JOSE RUBEN FOR "THE CHEAT" 

It is reported that Jose Ruben, who has 
been one of the Washington Square Play- 
ers' leading lights, will appear early next 
season with Grace George in Hector 
Turnbull's "The Cheat" 



MANAGERS FIGHT TAX 

(.Continued from page 3.) 
in its present form, calls for a flat tax 
of five cents on each pass holder. 

Mr. Johnson informed the committee 
that the organization which he repre- 
sented did not want to shun any of the 
burdens of the war through dodging taxa- 
tion, but that they desired an equitable 
distribution of the rate of taxation 
among all the amusement enterprises. 
He then called the attention of the com- 
mittee to the Canadian tax law which 
baa a minimum rate of one cent and a 
maximum rate of ten cents on all tickets 
as a fair base of revenue to be charged. 

John M. Kelly, of Chicago, who repre- 
sented the circus interests, stated that, 
if 10 per cent, of the price of admission 
into circuses is . levied, the Government 
would reeeive an enormous revenue while 
the circus may do no more than exist 
But should the tax be fair the Govern- 
ment would receive from $350,000 to 
$500,000 a year. 

As the bill stands at present, it would 
impose a 3 per cent, freight tax on daily 
circus movements of five trains, 10 per 
cent, on passenger and Pullman fares of 
its advertising men and agents and other 
taxation that would greatly handicap 
them, declared Kelly. These taxes, be 
declared, added to the excessive aggre- 
gate already imposed, would burden and 
restrict the circus in its operation, and 
are taxes which the circus cannot stand. 
He said that tbe tax of from $350,000 to 
$500,000, -which the Government would 
receive from the RinglingB, who own four 
outfits, would be a tremendous tax de- 
rived from one concern. 

William A. Brady, in speaking, stated 
that he feared that if the proposed tax 
would go through, that a great many of 
the motion picture exhibitors would be 
driven out of business. He stated that 
the business at present is not any too 
flourishing, and that if this exorbitant 
tax would be inflicted upon the "poor 
man's" amusement the patrons would be 
driven away from these establishments 
and that they would be compelled to go 
out of business.' 



May 16, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



ACTOR'S FUND FAIR RAISES 

$15,000 IN FIRS TjTWO DAYS 

Thousands of Artists Present When President Wilson Officially 
Opened Big Event — Burlesque Booth Great Attraction and 
Popularity Contest Is Keen. Former Records to Be Broken 



More than $15,000 was taken in at the 
Actors' Fund Fair in the Grand Central 
Palace up to last night. With a record- 
breaking attendance of ten thousand per- 
sons present on Saturday evening, when 
President Wilson pressed the button in 
Washington, which released the catch that 
unfurled the American flag and those of 
our allies, officially opening the fair, an 
average of from five to six thousand per- 
sons have been attending each day. 

After Mme. Louis Homer had sung the 
"Star-Spangled Banner" on Saturday 
night, the work of gathering the funds was 
begun with vim and zest by the thousands 
of workers who were distributed about the 
floor of the big building. 

One of the biggest attractions during 
the opening days of the fair was the bur- 
lesque booth, over which Mrs. T. W. 
Dinkens presided. It was elaborately dec- 
orated and arranged, and in attendance 
were the foremost burlesque actors and 
actresses. Among some of the latter seen 
there during the opening days were Mr. 
and Mrs. T. W. Dinkens. Mr. and Mrs. 
. Sam A. Scribner, Mrs Al Reeves, Mr. and 
Mrs. Harry Jacobs, Gertrude Hayes. 
Florence Mills. Florence Bennett, Fred 
Irwin, Eileen Sheridan. Edwin Paul. Dolly 
Garrison. Babe La Tour, Etta Pillard, 
Drena Mack, Zella Russell, Beatrice Har- 
lowe. Mary Evans, Martha Pryor, Claire 
Devine. Amy Evans, Florence Bother, 
Adelaide Madden. Madlyn Worth and June 
Mills 

Much interest is being evinced by 
those in attendance at this booth in the 
"'Burlesque Actors* Popularity Contest." 
During the first three days of the fair there 
were about 20.000 votes cast, with Gertrude 
Hayes, Ed. Lee Wrothe, Al. Beeves, Harry 
Koler, Florence Bennett, Amy Evans. 
Eileen Sheridan. Babe La Tour, Norma 
Brown and Florence Mills pretty well up in 
the running. The prize to the winner will 
be a Lozier automobile. 

Voting for the most popular stage star 
began Monday. 

The Navy Booth is attracting consider- 
able attention. Each day is allotted as a 
special one for the staff of a theatrical 
producer. Saturday night was "Belasco" 
night, and all the stars from the numerous 
Belasco attractions were present. Mon- 
day evening was Charles Dillingham night, 
and Mark A. Leuscher, who was in charge 
of the DiJlinghnm arrangements, had all 
their stars, headed by Fred Stone, Elsie 
■Tanis and Annette Kellerman, present. 
Mrs. Mark A. Leuscher will be in attend- 
ance at the booth throughout the fair. 

Sunday was Klaw & Erlanger day, with 
all of their stars present at the booth. 

Yesterday was Mecca day at the fair, 
and the Shriners turned out in vast num- 
bers. To-day will be Elks day, and it is 
expected that a large number of the 
B. P. O. E. will be in attendance. 

The Friars and Lambs are attracting 
•"nsiderable notice to themselves by their 
rival entertainments, which are given close 
to the dance floor of the Sixty Club. The 
Friars are also getting out a daily edition 
of the "Friars' Epistle" during the fair. 
This is being sold at a nominal sum, and 
has quite a circulation. 

The moving picture contingent was quite 
active in disposing of autographed photo- 
graphs of themselves. The active work- 
ers were Pauline Fredericks, Clara Kim- 
ball Young, Theda Bara, Virginia Pear- 
son. Marguerite Clark, the Lee Kids and 
Annette Kellerman. 

Among the prominent theatrical people 
seen presiding at the various booths were : 
W. H. Crane, Ben Greet, George Arliss, 
William Trevor, Mollie Pearson, Rita Law- 
rence. Kizie B. Masters, Charles E. Blaney, 
Cecile Snooner Blaney, Harriet Brent, 
Pauline Fredericks, Patricia Ryan, Sidney 
Shields. Kntherine Eggleston, William A. 
Brady. Daniel Frohman, president of the 



Actors' Fund; F. F. Mackey, Bernice 
Yerance, Mrs. George Botsford, Doris 
Kelley, King Baggot, Clarice Vance, Jean 
Stuart, Stuart Fox, Gertrude Dallas, Wells 
Hawks, Reginald De Koven, Augustas 
Thomas, Rex Beach, Rupert Hughes, 
Charles Dana Gibson, Mrs. Chauncey 
Olcott, BUIie Burke, Nora Bayes, Rachel 
Crothers, Kitty Gordon, Vera Beresford, 
Mary Nash, Florence Nash, Christine Nor- 
man, Peggy Foley, Audrey Osborne, Adele 
Rowland, Mary Boland, Ann Murdock, 
Anita Stewart, Olive Windham, Beth 
Lydy, Edna .Hunter, Edith Lyle, Vivian 
Martin, Madge Kennedy, Fania Marinoff, 
Shirley Carter, Sarah McVicker, Mabel 
Rowland, Doris Mitchell, Martha Evans, 
Katherine Proctor, Clara Burton, Mrs. 
Pitou, Virginia N. Palmer, Chamberlain 
Brown, Mrs. William Hammerstein, Mrs. 
Paul Gulick, Bijou Fernandez, Amelia 
Bingham, Gladys Hanson, Jeanne Eagles, 
Janet Dunbar, Ivy Troutman, Olive Tell, 
Edith Barker, Blanche Yurka, Mrs. Will- 
iam Courtleigb, Flo. Hart, Katherine 
Perry, Mary Alden, Mabel Acker, Edith 
Hallor, Jerry Cohan, George M. Cohan. 
Frances Ring, Florence Courtney, Mrs. 
Walter Hill, Bertha Galland, Mrs. Frank 
Losee, Julia Webb, Mrs. Jacob Litt, Julia 
Elinore, Louise Dresser, Edna Wallace 
Hopper, Nan Lewald, Mme. Elizabeth 
Menzeli, Helen Jackson, Bessie Watson, 
Edna Luby, Miss E. Bose, Nannie Cotter, 
Mrs. Alice Fisher Hnrco'urt, Mrs. Joe 
Grismer. Duchess de Richelieu. Mrs. James 
Speyer, Mrs. Ben Ali Haggin, Bessie Clark, 
Ethel King, Pauline Robinson, Edwinia 
Paul, Margaret Trevor, Pauline Riggs, 
Helen Rives, Margaret Luce, Beverly 
Sitgraves, Yvette Guilbert. Gabrielle Dor- 
zint. Yvonne Garrick, Juliette Dika, Jennie 
Diska, Leila Carton, Rosa Munde. Lucy 
Hamilton, Mrs. Paul McAllister. Jane 
Darra, Ada Patterson. Ann Van Vetchan. 
Nellie Turner, Helen Fulton. Marie Lyons. 
Sophie Lobenger, Kenneth Lee, Abraham 
Erlanger, Lee Shubert, Sallie Fischer, 
.Tosie Sadler, Lillian Lorraine, May Hop- 
kins. 

Edna West, who had charge of the "Hot 
Dog and Coffee Booth," had as assistants, 
Mary Cecil Parker, Jane Warrington, 
Beatrice Harron. Louise Reid. Lillian West, 
Stella Archer. Ruth Lloyd. Nan Anderson, 
Gladys Lockwood, Susanne Jackson, 
Amelia Gardner and Alice Dennison. 

Other present at the various booths in- 
cluded Katherine Lord, Mary Austin. 
Blanche Bates. Sarah Floyd. Mr. and Mrs. 
Tames K. Hackett, Mar garet G. Fawcett. 
Alice Putnam. Mrs. William Hodge. Percy 
HasweTl, Julia Dean, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas 
A. Wise. Marion Kerby, Laura Lyle. Rutb 
Cotton. Emma Frohman, Josephine Drake, 
Marjorie Maude. Ruth Findlay. Flavie 
Arearo, Virginia Brooks. Marenret Ro- 
maine. Ellinore Dawn. Reggy O'Neil, May 
Robson. Mrs. M. A. Pinto, Effingham 
Pinto. Harriet Ross, Theresa King. Mr. 
and Mrs. Charles Burnham. Harry Kline. 
Charles Dillingham. Bruce Edwards, Ethel 
Barrymore. Jane Cowl. Ruth Chatterton, 
Marjorie Rnmbeau. Jack Barrymore. 
Francis X. Bushman. Silvio Hein, Beverly 
Bayne, Victor Herbert, Irving Berlin. 
Jerome Kern, E. Ray Goetz, Gaston 
Kerker, Raymond Hnbbell. John Philip 
Sousa, Anna Wheaton, Justine Johnson, 
Anna Carrol], Grace Cameron, Hattie 
Bnrke, Flora Parker, Helen Rook. May 
Simms. Helen Williams. Florence Short. 
Alice Martin. Ruth Mitchell. Mrs. C. E. 
Stewart Helen Pollock. Anne Oates. Mme. 
Paderewski. Mrs. Julian Street. Mrs. 
Susanne Westford-Allen. Alma Chester. 
Kate Wilson. Mrs. Harry Brown. Helen 
Ritchie, Rosa Rand. Lillian Russell, Hilda 
Spong, Mrs. A. M. Palmer, Alice Hall. 
Mona Hungerford. Elsie Burt. Mercedes 
Desmore. Anna Ives, Marie Sasse. Peggy 
Adams. Mrs. Robert Fowler. Ids Nnlle. 
John W. Rumsey. Lauretfe Tnylor. 



ONCLEY-WOODS CASE ARGUED 

Tim action started in the Supreme 
Court by Amy Ongley, widow of Byron 
Ongley, the playrigbt, against A. H. 
Woods and Max Marcin, was called for 
trial before Justice Newburger last Mon- 
day. The plaintiff charged that, prior 
to his death, her husband bad colloborated 
with Marcin on a play which was pro- 
duced by Woods under the title of "Cheat- 
ing Cheaters." She alleges that the play 
bad a different working title, and that her 
husband bad died before its completion. 

Nathan Burkan and Max D. Steuer, who 
appeared respectively for Woods and Mar- 
cin in their pleadings, argued that any con- 
tract that existed between Marcin and 
Ongley was abrogated by the tatter's 
death and, therefore, asked for a judg- 
ment on the pleadings. 

After hearing the argument of the at- 
torneys for the defendants, and Martin W. 
Littleton, attorney for Mrs. Ongley, 
Justice Newburger ordered the attorneys 
to submit briefs on the iriatter by May 
24, when he would make his decision. 
Mrs. Ongley's suit was for an accounting 
and damages. 



HOUSE TURNS UNION 

Harry Williams, business manager of 
the Theatrical Federation of New York, 
on Monday, signed an agreement with 
C. S. Faulkner, manager of the Stein way 
Theatre, Astoria, L. I., a vaudeville and 
motion picture house, whereby it will in- 
stall union help affiliated with the Ameri- 
can Federation of Labor. The men tbey 
will employ beginning next Monday come 
from Locals 310 and 306. 

The bouse in the past has had members 
of the Amalgamated Stage Hands* Union, 
affiliated with the Industrial Workers of 
the World, operating the stage and motion 
picture machines. 



ROCK & WHITE'S NEW SONGS 

William Rock and Frances White, the 
favorites of Broadway for many months 
past, have recently placed with M. Wit- 
mark ft Sons for immediate publication, two 
new songs that they will feature specially 
in the forthcoming musical revue, "Hitchy- 
Koo." Both these numbers are typical of 
the act presented by this team, and there 
is likely to be a big demand for them. The 
first is "Six Times Six are Thirty Six." 
and the other is "I'd Like to Be a Monkey 
in the Zoo." The new revue is due at the 
Cohan ft Harris Theatre early next month. 



SARAH PADDEN GETS RECRUITS 

Dayton. O.. May 10. — Sarah Padden, 
playing at Keith's Theatre, did a novel re- 
cruiting stunt this week. She visited the 
various munitions factories in the city, 
called a mass meeting at each and. address- 
ing the men from an automobile, told them 
she would personally answer every letter 
that was sent to her from the trenches, 
bearing the postmark of France. As a 
consequenece the Third Regiment of the 
Federalized National Guard, here, enlisted 
quite a force of men. 



HOUDINI BUYS N. V. A. COVER 

At a well attended meeting of the Na- 
tional Vaudeville Artists. Inc.. held at the 
Palace Theatre yesterday morning for the 
purpose of auctioning preferred advertis- 
ing positions in the N. V. A. benefit per- 
formance program, the front cover was 
sold to Harry Houdini for $499. Harry 
Weber was the chief bidder against 
Houdini. By telegram. Tempest and Sun- 
shine bid $350 and Will Cressy offered 
$400. Pat Casey acted as auctioneer. 



SINGER SUES CAR COMPANY 

St. Louis, May 11. — Madame Sehumann- 
Heink, the famed opera singer, has filed 
suit against the United Railways of St. 
Louis. She claims damages of $95,000 for 
injuries sustained when a taxirab in which 
she was riding February 23 was struck 
by a street car. Owing to the accident 
she was forced to cancel many concert en- 
gagements. 



FRANCES KENNEDY 

Frances Kennedy, whose picture appears 
on the front cover of this week's Clifpeb, 
is one of Chicago's most talented singers. 

She possesses a clear, well trained voice 
of excellent quality which she uses with 
fine effect in the rendition of either classi- 
cal or popular selections. She is equally 
at borne on either the concert or vaudeville 
stage and has appeared on both with 
marked success. 



CABARET PERFORMERS MARRY 

Cincinnati, May 14. — Alice Sanker, 
who baa bad singing and dancing roles 
with several big productions, and Ray- 
mond McDcrmott, musician, were married 
in Buffalo the other day, their friends in 
Cincinnati have just learned. Miss Sanker, 
daughter of Edward Sanker, owner of 
Sauker's Garden, and McDermott, son of a 
Cincinnati, contractor, have been appear- 
ing together in a Buffalo hotel cabaret. 



CENTURY CASE HANGS FIRE 

The suit against the Century Theatre, 
which was tried several weeks ago and 
in which certain property owners in the 
neighborhood objected to the granting of 
a liquor license to the theatre is still 
undecided. The court has asked the attor- 
neys to present further affidavits. 



JOAN SAWYER LOSES PLEA 

On Monday last Supreme Court Justice 
Bijur denied an application made by Joan 
Sawyer for a receiver to be appointed to 
handle the business of the An Caprice 
Restaurant, which, the dancer alleged, 
owed her approximately $1,500. 

DUMONT MINSTRELS TO TOUR 

Philadelphia, May 14. — Frank Du- 
mont has decided to make a short tour 
with his minstrel company after he closes 
in this city next Saturday night. A week 
from to-day he will go on the road in New 
Jersey and Pennsylvania. 



KANES CLOSE SEASON 

Baltimore, Md., May 11. — After a sea- 
son of thirty-five weeks Mr. and Mrs. Billy 
Kane closed with "The Girls of all Na- 
tions" Co. last week in Pt. Marion, Pa., 
and are now at their summer home in this 
city. 



WILL RETURN TO BURLESQUE 
Bill Deery, a burlesque comedian, who 
baa been employed in the munition plants 
in New Jersey, has abandoned that occu- 
pation and will return to burlesque next 



BUHLA PEARL RESUMES ROUTE 
Cleveland, Ohio, May 12. — Bnbla 
Pearl, who was forced to lay off for a 
week in this city because of throat trouble, 
has resumed her vaudeville route, which 
terminates at McVieker's, Chicago, June 4. 

MORTON AND RUSSELL SIGNED 

Harry K. Morton ' and Zella Russell, 
who were with the Burlesque Review this 
season, have been signed by Jacobs and 
Jermon, Inc., for another three years, com- 
mencing next season. 



"FOLLIES" OPEN JUNE 11 

Following a week at the Apollo Theatre, 
Atlantic City, the 1917 edition of Ziegfeld's 
"Follies" will open in New York Monday, 
June 11, at the New Amsterdam Theatre. 



HARTFORD THEATRE AGAIN UNION 

Hartford. May 12. — The Hartford The- 
atre, under the new Goldstein manage- 
ment, once more returns to the union, 
orchestra and all. 



D. P. STEWART AT PLATTSBURG 
Donald P. Stewart, of the Stewart 
Theatrical Shoe Company, has been sta- 
tioned at Plattsbnrg in the officers* re- 
serve corps. 



HATTIE BURKS LEAVES "WIDOWS" 
Hattie Burks has been compelled to 
leave the cast of "His Little Widows." 
owing to illness, and her place in the 
company has been taken by Edith Day. 

BEN FOY COMPANY CLOSES 

Shznandoba, Pa., May 9. — Ben Foy's 
Musical Comedy Co. closed its fifth season 
last week, after playing for forty consecu- 
tive weeks. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



May 16, 1917 



STAGE HANDS 

HOLD BIG 

ELECTION 

McKENNA WINS PRESIDENCY 



The annual election of Theatrical Pro- 
tective Union No. 1, affiliated with the 
International Alliance of Theatrical 
Stage Employees, was held in the New 
Amsterdam Hall on Sunday afternoon. 
Out of a membership of 1,000 members, 
there were 538 in attendance, making this 
the largest attended meeting in the history 
of the local. 

For Beveral hours before the meeting 
was called to order the various candidates 
and their workers were "electioneering" 
about the halL There was considerable 
rivalry existing between B. P. Gately and 
T. J. McKenna, the candidates for presi- 
dent. They and their workers had been 
electioneering for the past two weeks, and 
did not let op until the ballots were dis- 
tributed for voting. When the count was 
taken, McKenna obtained 294 votes to 
209 cart for Gately. " 

W. S. Davis easily defeated J. C. Mc- 
Donald for the vice-presidency by a vote 
of 320 to 193. Harry L. Abbott was 
re-elected secretary-business agent, with- 
out any opposition, there being no candi- 
date in the fleW. 

Harry Palmer was re-elected business 
agent over William E. Monroe by a vote 
of 307 to 210. E. H. Convey had an 
easy time for re-election as financial sec- 
retary-treasurer, defeating W. Timoney by 
a vote of 405 to 107. James Tracey was 
elected to the office of sergeant-at-arms 
without opposition. 

Three out of a field of five were chosen 
as members of the executive board. They 
were: J. I*. Meeker, the retiring president 
of the organization ; Tom Burke and W. 
Bass. The defeated candidates were W. E. 
Duing and M. Kelly. 

J. Tierney was elected trustee over C. S. 
Murphy, whom he defeated by a margin of 
twenty-five votes. 

By a vote of 268 to 230, T. J. Mc- 
Kenna defeated H. Is. Abbott for the posi- 
tion of delegate to the State convention 
of the American Federation of Labor. 

'SHOW OF WONDERS" IN CHICAGO 

Chicago, May 16. — 'The Show of 
Wonders," the Shoberts* latest Winter 
Garden offering in Chicago, opens to-night 
at the Garrick. George Monroe. Howard 
Bros.. Marflynn Miller, Walter C. Kelley, 
Grace Fisher, Sydney Phillips, Jack 
Googan. White * Clayton, Eugene 
O'Rourke. Dan Quinlan, Adele Ardsley. 
Alexis Kosloff. Edmund Mulcahy. James 
Grant. Virginia Smith, Eleanor Brown. 
Myrtle Victorine are In the cast. 

GET PLAY FOR BILLIE BURKE 

F. Zierfeld announced yesterday that he 
had arranged with Arthur Hopkins to 
star Billie Burke next season under their 
joint management In a play by Clara 
Knmmer. The title for the play has not 
yet been decided upon. 

"HTrCHY-KOO" OPENING SET 

"Hitchy-Koo," the new Raymond Hitch- 
cock entertainment to be seen in New 
York this summer, will be given its first 
production May 28 at Atlantic City. 

CORT SIGNS EDITH TALIAFERRO 

Edith TaliaferTo has signed with John 
Cort to play the role of Nancy in "Mother 
Cnrev*B Chickens," which will be seen at 
the Cort Theatre in September. 

EDITH HALLOR IN "FOLLIES" 

Edith Hallor was engaged by F. Zieg- 
feld on Monday for the new "Follies" 
soon to be seen* on the Amsterdam Roof. 



INVESTIGATE MANAGER'S DEATH 

An inquest was held yesterday in the 
Coroner's Court, Brooklyn, by Coroner 
Senior, to determine the cause of death 
of Maximilian Bosen-Ruwe, a motion pic- 
ture actor and former theatrical manager, 
who died last week in the Brooklyn State 
Hospital for the Insane. The inqnest was 
conducted at the instigation of Ernest 
Rosen-Riaae, a son, who informed the Cor- 
oner that, prior to the death of his father 
he had complained of having been severely 
beaten by attendants at the hospital. The 
deceased was formerly associated with 
Reginald De Koven and Klaw & Er- 
langer. He was fifty-five years old, and 
his home was at 31 Bay Twenty-ninth 
Street, Bensonhurst, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



MOUNTFORD AIDE JOINS NAVY 

A. Edward Boas, formerly private sec- 
retary to Harry Monntford, late inter- 
national executive of the White Rats, is 
still keen for fighting, for he has enlisted 
in the Naval Reserve, and is graded as 
chief yeoman, attached to the office of 
Commander Patton in the New York dis- 
trict. He requests that Ills friends be in- 
formed that lie passed his examination with 
a qualification of 100 per cent, both 
mentally and physically. 



COL. JOHN BRAGG DIES 

Boston, May 14. — Col. John Bragg, 
who for many years has been interested in 
theatrical productions, died suddenly last 
Thursday from apoplexy at his home in 
Sberbnrn, a suburb of Boston. The colonel 
and his wife, an actress, reached New 
York the first of the month after a tour 
of the South, where they had been en- 
gaged in producing a fantasy. He came 
to Sherbnrn a day or two later, leaving 
bis wife in New York. 



MUSICAL GIRLS CO. TO TOUR 
Saskatoon, Can., May 12. — Smith and 
Hamilton's Musical Girls will close their 
seventh week at the Strand Theatre here 
to-night, and will go on the road present- 
ing musical comedy in Saskatchewan, 
Manitoba and Alberta. 'The company has 
been recently strengthened by the addition 
of Rene La Vera. Doris Clifford and 
Gordon Clarke. Mr. Clarke is a dancer and 
is featured with Miss Clarice Groves. 



SALVATION ARMY TAKES THEATRE 

Philadelphia, May 11. — lie Park The- 
atre was taken possession of last week 
by the Salvation Army as its central bar- 
racks. The house was bought last year 
by John Wanamaker, who expended $50,- 
000 in remodeling it for the uses of the 
Army. It is understood that Mr. Wana- 
maker intends presenting the building to 
the Salvation Army. It represents an out- 
lay of $200,000. 



MAY ABANDON COLORED THEATRE 

PTTTT.AniCT.pHiA. May 11. — The project of 
the Quality Amusement Co. of New York 
to build a theatre at Broad and Lombard 
streets, exclusively for colored patronage, 
seems to have fallen through. Title to 
the property has already passed to the com- 
pany, bnt it is said that inability to finance 
tbe erection of the theatre wOI probably 
cause the abandonment of tbe enterprise. 



"LURE OF ALASKA" IN SASKATOON 

Saskatoon. Can.. May 12. — 'The Lure 
of Alaska." a travelogue presented by Dr. 
Sngden. lecturer, formerly . government 
pilot in the White Horse Pass, was pre- 
sented at the Empire Theatre here the 
latter half of this week. 



ACTRESS SUED FOR DIVORCE 

Marie Poesner, better known in vaude- 
ville and in films as Marie Paris, is being 
sued for divorce by her husband. John W. 
Murray. 



CHARLOTTE OPENS IN CABARET 

Chicago. May 15. — Terrace Garden, in 
the New Morrison Hotel, opens to-night 
with Charlotte, the Danish ice skater. 



BELASC0 WILL 

WRITE MACK 

PLAY_0VER 

WOODS WINS INJUNCTION SUIT 



Following the decision of ex-Judge E. 
Henry Lacombe, appointed referee in tbe 
action brought by A. H. Woods against 
David Belasco and Willard Mack, in which 
he granted an injunction, restraining Be- 
lasco from producing any plays written by 
Mack, or the latter writing for any one 
but Woods, during the term of a contract 
now in existence, Belasco, on Saturday 
night, ended the engagement of "The Tiger 
Rose," a play in which he and Mack had 
collaborated, at Ford's Theatre, Baltimore. 
Tbe contract on which this suit was 
founded was entered into between Woods 
and Mack on November 5, 1915, and had 
five years to run from that date. 

In rendering his decision Judge Lacombe 
stated: 

"Of course, he (Belasco), is entitled to 
produce the product of big own work. If 
the defendant (Belasco), can rewrite the 
play hipiaglf or can find some one else to 
do it in such a way as to eliminate Mack's 
contributions, he may do so." 

This suggestion is to be acted upon by 
Mr. Belasco and, upon his return to New 
York this week he will immediately make 
arrangements to have the piece rewritten. 
He expects that an entirely new script, 
with the Mack material eliminated will be 
furnished him by the fore part of August 
so that he will be able to produce the 
play again early in the Fall . 

Tn reference to the production of "Alias 
Santa Onus," of which Mack supplied tbe 
dramatic version to Belasco, it was shown 
that Mr. Belasco had contracted with 
Mack to write this play on October 26. 
1915, which was prior to the execution 
of the contract between Woods and Mack. 
The Court, therefore, held that Woods was 
entitled to no relief in this direction. 

It is claimed by Mr. Belasco that, even 
thongh Mack can furnish him with no 
play material, he can employ him in an 
acting capacity, and that he will probably 
appear in the rewritten "Tiger Rose" with 
Leonore TJlrich, who will be starred. 

House, Grossman & Vorbans were tbe 
attorneys for Woods, in the action, and 
Irving Dittenhoefer represented Belasco. 



PLAN TO HONOR GROVER 

Leonard Grover, a dominating figure in 
Brooklyn's grand opera and drama, will 
be tendered a jubilee testimonial on Sun- 
day, May 27, at the Majestic Theatre, 
Brooklyn. Among the members of the 
committee in charge are: Enrico Caruso, 
Daniel Frohman. George C. Tyler, F. F. 
Mackay. John Drew, George M. Cohan, 
George H. Nicolai, Herbert Kelcey, James 
O'Neill, Lew Dockstader, Steney Drew, 
Henry E. Direy, Ralph Delmore, Julian 
Eltinge. John E. Kellerd. Ralph W. Ince, 
James Mclntyre. Har ry T . Morey. Robert 
Hffliard, John Mason, Willis P. Sweatnam. 
Lionel Barrymore, H. F. Kensey, Francis 
X. Bushman, Tom Heath. John Ryan and 
Burr Mcintosh. 

Melville E. Stone, president of the Asso- 
ciated Press, is aso a member of the com- 
mittee and Edward E. Trail is treasurer. 



MRS. FISKE CLOSES SEASON 

St. Paul. May 14. — Mrs. Fiske closed 
her season in "Erstwhile Susan" Satur- 
day night here. 



BRAUN JOINS HITCHCOCK SHOW 

Terse Hatjte, Ind., May 12. — C. E. 
Braun. of this city, has joined the Ray- 
mond Hitchcock company in "Betty." 



MRS. BERT KALMAR HURT 

Mrs. Bert Kalmar (Jessica Brown), of 
Kalmar & Brokn, who are appearing at 
tbe Alhambra Theatre this week, was 
badly shaken up as the result of an auto- 
mobile collision on Sunday night when 
she was driving at Freeport, L. I. An- 
other car ran into hers. 

Mrs. Kalmar was on her way to a 
motion picture theatre with her two-year- 
old daughter, when an automobile coming 
along tbe road ran into the side of the 
car, throwing her and the child to the 
bottom of the machine. A physician who 
was going by at the time attended Mrs. 
Kalmar. and removed her to . her home. 
The child was not injured. 



S50.000 ASKED FOR FLAY 

Summonses have been served on Lee 
Morrison, playwright, and the Daniels 
Amusement Company, of Brooklyn, at the 
instance of the Punch and Judy Theatre 
Company, asking for damages amounting 
to $50,000. 

The suit is being brought over a produc- 
tion of "Treasure Island," which was pre- 
sented at the Grand Opera House, Brook- 
lyn, during the week of April 22. The 
play, as there presented, was from the 
pen of Lee Morrison. Another version, 
written by Jules Eckert Goodman, ran 
for three seasons at the Punch and Judy 
Theatre in this city, and is now on tour. 

In the complaint, which has not yet been 
filed, the plaintiff will probably allege that 
it has the only rights to produce "Treasure 
Island," although the defendants will 
probably contend that the copyright on 
Robert Louis Stevenson's story has ex- 
pired, and that any one can now lawfully 
make a version of it. 



ACTORS' ELECTION TUESDAY 

The Actors' Fund of America will hold 
its annual meeting for the election of of- 
ficers next Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock 
at the Hudson Theatre. All members in 
good standing are requested to attend and 
take part in the election and transaction 
of business. Non-members and their 
friends are also invited. 



"PROPS" GRANTED DIVORCE 

Louis J. Schwartz, property man of 
Loew's American Theatre, has received an 
absolute decree of divorce from his wife, 
known on the stage as Rose Beck. The 
decree was granted by Justice Lehman, of 
the Supreme Court of New York 



JOSE RUBEN FOR "THE CHEAT" 

It is reported that Jose Ruben, who has 
been one of the Washington Square Play- 
els' leading lights, will appear early next 
season with Grace George in Hector 
Tumball's "Tbe Cheat" 



MANAGERS FIGHT TAX 

( Continued from page 3.) 
in its present form, calls for a fiat tax 
of five cents on each pass holder. 

Mr. Johnson informed the committee 
that the organization which he repre- 
sented did not want to shun any of the 
burdens of the war through dodging taxa- 
tion, but that they desired an equitable 
distribution of the rate of taxation 
among all the amusement enterprises. 
He then called the attention of the com- 
mittee to tbe Canadian tax law which 
has a minimum rate of one cent and a 
maximum rate of ten cents on all tickets 
as a fair base of revenue to be charged. 

John M. Kelly, of Chicago, who repre- 
sented the circus interests, stated that, 
if 10 per cent, of the price of admission 
into circuses is . levied, the Government 
would receive an enormous revenue while 
tbe circus may do no more than exist. 
Bnt should the tax be fair the Govern- 
ment would receive from $350,000 to 
$500,000 a year. 

As the hill stands at present, it would 
impose a 3 per cent, freight tax on daily 
circus movements of five trains, 10 per 
cent, on passenger and Pullman fares of 
its advertising men and agents and other 
taxation that would greatly handicap 
them, declared Kelly. These taxes, he 
declared, added to the excessive aggre- 
gate already imposed, would burden and 
restrict the circus in its operation, and 
are taxes which the circus cannot stand. 
He said that the tax of from $350,000 to 
$600,000, -which the Government would 
receive from the Ringlings, who own four 
outfits, would be a tremendous tax de- 
rived from one concern. 

William A. Brady, in speaking, stated 
that he feared that if the proposed tax 
would go through, that a great many of 
the motion picture exhibitors would be 
driven out of business. He stated that 
the business at present is not any too 
flourishing, and that if this exorbitant 
tax would be inflicted upon the "poor 
man's" amusement the patrons would be 
driven away from these establishments 
and that they would be compelled to go 
ont of business.' 



May 16, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



ACTOR'S FUND FAIR RAISES 

$15,000 IN FIRS T jTWO DAYS 

Thousands of Artists Present When President Wilson Officially 

Opened Big Event — Burlesque Booth Great Attraction and 

Popularity Contest Is Keen. Former Records to Be Broken 

More than $15,000 was taken in at the 
Actors' Fund Fair in the Grand Central 
Palace up to last night With a record- 
breaking attendance of ten thousand per- 
sons present on Saturday evening, when 
President Wilson pressed the button in 
Washington, which released the catch that 
unfurled the American flag and those of 
our allies, officially opening the fair, an 
average of from five to six thousand per- 
sons have been attending each day. 

After Mme. Louis Homer had sung the 
"Star-Spangled Banner" on Saturday 
night, the work of gathering the funds was 
begun with vim and zest by the thousands 
. of workers who were distributed about the 
Boor of the big building. 

One of the biggest attractions during 
the opening days of the fair was the bur- 
lesque booth, over which Mrs. T. W. 
Dinkens presided. It was elaborately dec- 
orated and arranged, and in attendance 
were the foremost burlesque actors and 
actresses. Among some of the latter seen 
there during the opening days were Mr. 
and Mrs. T. W. Dinkens, Mr. and Mrs. 
• Sam A. Scribner, Mrs Al Reeves, Mr. and 
Mrs. Harry Jacobs, Gertrude Hayes, 
Florence Mills, Florence Bennett, Fred 
Irwin, Eileen Sheridan. Edwin Paul, Dolly 
Garrison." Babe La Tour, Etta Pillard, 
Drena Mack, Zella Russell, Beatrice Har- 
lowe. Mary Evans, Martha Pryor, Claire 
Devine. Amy Evans, Florence Rotber, 
Adelaide Madden, Madlyn Worth and June 
Mills 

Much interest is being evinced by 
those in attendance at this booth in the 
"Burlesque Actors* Popularity Contest." 
During the first three days of the fair there 
were about 20,000 votes cast, with Gertrude 
Hayes, EM. Lee Wrothe, Al. Reeves, Harry 
Koler. Florence Bennett, Amy Evans, 
Eileen Sheridan, Babe La Tour, Norma 
Brown and Florence Mills pretty well np In 
the running. The prize to the winner will 
be a Lozier automobile. 

Voting for the most popular stage star 
began Monday. 

The Navy Booth is attracting consider- 
able attention. Each day is allotted as a 
special one for the staff of a theatrical 
producer. Saturday night was "Belasco" 
night, and all the stars from the numerous 
Belasco attractions were present. Mon- 
day evening was Charles Dillingham night. 
and Mark A. Leuscher, who was in charge 
of the Dillingham arrangements, had all 
their stars, headed by Fred Stone, Elsie 
•Tanis and Annette Kellerman, present. 
Mrs. Mark A. Leuscher will be in attend- 
ance at the booth throughout the fair. 

Sunday was Klaw & Erlanger day, with 
all of their stars present at the booth. 

Yesterday was Mecca day at the fair, 
and the Shriners turned out in vast num- 
bers. To-day will be Elks day, and it is 
expected that a large number of the 
B. P. O. E. win be in attendance. 

The Friars and Lambs are attracting 
considerable notice to themselves by their 
rival entertainments, which are given close 
to the dance floor of the Sixty Club. The 
Friars are also getting out a daily edition 
of the "Friars' Epistle" during the fair. 
This is being sold at a nominal sum, and 
has quite a circulation. 

The moving picture contingent was quite 
active in disposing of autographed photo- 
graphs of themselves. The active work- 
ers were Pauline Fredericks, Clara Kim- 
ban Young, Theda Bara, Virginia Pear- 
son. Marguerite Clark, the Lee Kids and 
Annette Kellerman. 

Among the prominent theatrical people 
seen presiding at the various booths were : 
W- H. Crane, Ben Greet, George Arliss, 
William Trevor, Mollie Pearson, Rita Law- 
rence. Kizie B. Masters, Charles E. Blaney, 
Cecile Snooner Blaney, Harriet Brent, 
Pauline Fredericks. Patricia Ryan. Sidney 
Shields. Kntherine Eggleston, William A. 
Brady. Daniel Frohman, president of the 



Actors* Fund; F. F. Mackey, Bernice 
Yerance, Mrs. George Botsford, Doris 
Kelley, King Baggot, Clarice Vance, Jean 
Stuart, Stuart Fox, Gertrude Dallas, Wells 
Hawks, Reginald De Koven, Augustus 
Thomas, Rex Beach, Rupert Hughes, 
Charles Dana Gibson, Mrs. Chauncey 
Olcott, Billie Burke, Nora Bayes, Rachel 
Crothers, Kitty Gordon, Vera Beresford, 
Mary Nash, Florence Nash, Christine Nor- 
man, Peggy Foley, Audrey Osborne, Adele 
Rowland, Mary Boland, Ann Murdock, 
Anita Stewart, Olive Windham, Beth 
Lydy, Edna .Hunter, Edith Lyle, Vivian 
Martin, Madge Kennedy, Fania Marinoff, 
Shirley Carter, Sarah McVicker, Mabel 
Rowland, Doris Mitchell, Martha Evans, 
Katherine Proctor, Clara Burton, Mrs. 
Pitou, Virginia N. Palmer, Chamberlain 
Brown, Mrs. William Hammerstein, Sirs. 
Paul Gulick, Bijou Fernandez, Amelia 
Bingham, Gladys Hanson, Jeanne Eagles, 
Janet Dunbar, Ivy Troutman, Olive Tell, 
Edith Barker, Blanche Yurka, Mrs. Will- 
iam Courtleigh, Flo. Hart, Katherine 
Perry, Mary Alden, Mabel Acker, Edith 
Hallor, Jerry Cohan, George M. Cohan. 
Frances Ring, Florence Courtney, Mrs. 
Walter Hill, Bertha Galland, Mrs. Frank 
i/osee, Julia Webb, Mrs. Jacob Litt, Julia 
Elinore, Louise Dresser, Edna Wallace 
Hopper, Nan Lewald, Mme. Elizabeth 
Menzeli, Helen Jackson, Bessie Watson, 
Edna Luby, Miss E. Rose, Nannie Cotter, 
Mrs. Alice Fisher Harco'urt, Mrs. Joe 
Grismer. Duchess de Richelieu. Mrs. James 
Speyer, Mrs. Ben Ali Haggin, Bessie Clark, 
Ethel King, Pauline Robinson, Edwinia 
Paul, Margaret Trevor, Pauline Riggs, 
Helen Rives. Margaret Luce. Beverly 
Sitgraves, Yvette Guilbert, Gabrielle Dor- 
ziat, Yvonne Garrick, Juliette Dika, Jennie 
Diska, Leila Carton, Rosa Munde, Lucy 
Hamilton, Mrs. Paul McAllister, Jane 
Darra, Ada Patterson. Ann Van Vetchan, 
Nellie Turner, Helen Fulton, Marie Lyons. 
Sophie Lobenger, Kenneth Lee. Abraham 
Erlanger, Lee Shubert Sallie Fischer. 
Josie Sadler, Lillian Lorraine. May Hop- 
kins. 

Edna West, who had charge of the "Hot 
Dog and Coffee Booth," had as assistants, 
Mary Cecil Parker, Jane Warrington, 
Beatrice Harron. Louise Reid. Lillian West, 
Stella Archer. Ruth Lloyd. Nan Anderson, 
Gladys Lockwood, Susanne Jackson, 
Amelia Gardner and Alice Dennison. 

Other present at the various booths in- 
cluded Katherine Lord. Mary Austin. 
Blanche Bates. Sarah Floyd. Mr. and Mrs. 
James K. Hackett, Margaret G. Fawcett, 
Alice Putnam. Mrs. WDliam Hodge. Percy 
Haswell, Julia Dean, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas 
A. Wise. Marion Kerby, Laura Lyle. Ruth 
Cotton. Emma Frohman, Josephine Drake. 
Marjorie Maude. Ruth Findlay. Flavie 
Arcaro, Virginia Brooks. Margaret Ro- 
maine, Ellinore Dawn, Reggy OTfeil, May 
Robson. Mrs. M. A. Pinto, Effingham 
Pinto. Harriet Ross. Theresa King. Mr. 
and Mrs. Charles Burnham. Harry Kline, 
Charles Dillingham. Bruce Edwards, Ethel 
Barrymore. Jane Cowl. Ruth Chatterton, 
Marjorie Rambeau. Jack Barrymore, 
Francis X. Bushman. Silvio Hein, Beverly 
Bayne, Victor Herbert, Irving Berlin. 
Jerome Kern. E. Ray Goetz, Gaston 
Kerker. Raymond HnbbeH, John Philip 
Sousa, Anna Wheaton, Justine Johnson. 
Anna Carroll. Grace Cameron, Hattie 
Burke, Flora Parker, Helen Rook. May 
Simms. Helen Williams. Florence Short, 
Alice Martin. Ruth Mitchell. Mrs. C. E. 
Stewart. Helen Pollock. Anne Oates. Mme. 
Paderewski. Mrs. Jnlian Street. Mrs. 
Susanne Westford-Allen, Alma Chester. 
Kate Wilson, Mrs. Harry Brown. Helen 
Ritchie, Rosa Rand. Lillian Russell, Hilda 
Spong. Mrs. A. M. Palmer, Alice Hall. 
Mona Hungerford. Elsie Burt Mercedes 
Desmore. Anna Ives. Marie Sasse. Peggy 
Adams. Mrs. Robert Fowler. Ids Nolle. 
John W. Ramsey. Laurette Tn.vlor. 



ONGLEY- WOODS CASE ARGUED 

The action started in the Supreme 
Court by Atny Oogley, widow of Byron 
Ongley, the playright, against A. H. 
Woods and Max Marcin, was called for 
trial before Justice Newburger last Mon- 
day. The plaintiff charged that, prior 
to his death, her husband had colloborated 
with Marcin on a play which was pro- 
duced by Woods under the title of "Cheat- 
ing Cheaters." She alleges that the play 
bad a different working title, and that her 
husband bad died before its completion. 

Nathan Burkan and Max D. Stener, who 
appeared respectively for Woods and Mar- 
cin in their pleadings, argued that any con- 
tract that existed between Marcin and 
Ongley was abrogated by the latter** 
death and, therefore, asked for a judg- 
ment on the pleadings. 

After hearing the argument of the at- 
torneys for the defendants, and Martin W. 
Littleton, attorney for Mrs. Ongley, 
Justice Newburger ordered the attorneys 
to submit briefs on the nlatter by May 
24, when he would make his derision. 
Mrs. Ongley's suit was for an accounting 
and damages. 



HOUSE TURNS UNION 

Harry Williams, business manager of 
the Theatrical Federation of New York, 
on Monday, signed an agreement with 
C. S. Faulkner, manager of the Stein way 
Theatre, Astoria, L. I., a vaudeville and 
motion picture honse, whereby it will in- 
stall union help affiliated with the Ameri- 
can Federation of Labor. The men they 
will employ beginning next Monday come 
from Locals 310 and 306. ' 

The house in the past has had members 
of the Amalgamated Stage Hands' Union, 
affiliated with the Industrial Workers of 
the World, operating the stage and motion 
picture machines. 



ROCK & WHITE'S NEW SONGS 

William Rock and Frances White, the 
favorites of Broadway for many months 
past, have recently placed with M. Wit- 
mark & Sons for immediate publication, two 
new songs that they will feature specially 
in the forthcoming musical revue, "Hitchy- 
Koo." Both these numbers are typical of 
the act presented by this team, and there 
is likely to be a big demand for them. The 
first is "Six Times Six are Thirty Six." 
and the other is "I'd Like to Be a Monkey 
In the Zoo." The new revue is due at the 
Cohan & Harris Theatre early next month. 



SARAH PADDEN GETS RECRUITS 

Dayton, O.. May 10. — Sarah Padden, 
playing at Keith's Theatre, did a novel re- 
cruiting stunt this week. She visited the 
various munitions factories in the city. 
called a mass meeting at each and. address- 
ing the men from an automobile, told them 
she would personally answer every letter 
that was sent to her from the trenches, 
bearing the postmark of France. As a 
consequenece the Third Regiment of the 
Federalized National Guard, here, enlisted 
quite a force of men. 



HOUDINI BUYS N. V. A. COVER 

At a well attended meeting of the Na- 
tional Vaudeville Artists, Inc., held at the 
Palace Theatre yesterday morning for the 
purpose of auctioning preferred advertis- 
ing positions in the N. V. A. benefit per- 
formance program, the front cover was 
sold to Harry Houdini for $499. Harry 
Weber was the chief bidder against 
Houdini. By telegram. Tempest and Sun- 
shine bid $350 and Will Creasy offered 
$400. Pat Casey acted as auctioneer. 



SINGER SUES CAR COMPANY 

St. Louis, May 11. — Madame Schumann- 
Heink, the famed opera singer, has filed 
suit against the United Railways of St. 
Louis. She claims damages of $95,000 for 
injuries sustained when a taxicab in which 
she was riding February 23 was struck 
by a street car. Owing to the accident 
she was forced to cancel many concert en- 
gagements. 



FRANCES KENNEDY 

Frances Kennedy, whose picture appears 
on the front cover of this week's Cmppxs, 
is one of Chicago's most talented singers. 

She possesses a clear, well trained voice 
of excellent quality which she usea with 
fine effect in the rendition of either classi- 
cal or popular selections. She is equally 
at home on either the concert or vaudeville 
stage and has appeared on both with 
marked success. 



CABARET PERFORMERS MARRY 

Cincinnati, May 14. — Alice Sanker, 
who has bad singing and dancing roles 
with several big productions, and Ray- 
mond McDermott, musician, were married 
in Buffalo the other day, their friends in 
Cincinnati have just learned. Miss Sanker, 
daughter of Edward Sanker, owner of 
Sanker's Garden, and McDermott, son of a 
Cincinnati, contractor, have been appear- 
ing together in a Buffalo hotel cabaret. 



CENTURY CASE HANGS FIRE 

The suit against the Century Theatre, 
which was tried several weeks ago and 
in which certain property owners in the 
neighborhood objected to the granting of 
a liquor license to the theatre is still 
undecided. The court has asked the attor- 
neys to present further affidavits. 



JOAN SAWYER LOSES PLEA 

On Monday last Supreme Court Justice 
Bijur denied an application made by Joan 
Sawyer for a receiver to be appointed to 
handle the business of the Au Caprice 
Restaurant, which, the dancer alleged, 
owed her approximately $1,500. 

DUMONT MINSTRELS TO TOUR 

Philadelphia, May 14. — Frank Dn- 
mont has decided to make a short tour 
with his minstrel company after he closes 
in this city next Saturday night. A week 
from to-day he will go on the road in New 
Jersey and Pennsylvania. 



KANES CLOSE SEASON 

Baltimore. Md., May 11. — After a sea- 
son of thirty-five weeks Mr. and Mrs. Billy 
Kane closed with "The Girls of all Na- 
tions" Co. last week in Pt. Marion, Pa., 
and are now at their summer home in this 
city. 



WILL RETURN TO BURLESQUE 

Bill Deery, a burlesque comedian, who 
has been employed in the munition plants 
in New Jersey, has abandoned that occu- 
pation and will return to burlesqne next 
season. 



BUHLA PEARL RESUMES ROUTE 

Cleveland, Ohio, May 12. — Bubla 
Pearl, who was forced to lay off for a 
week in this city because of throat trouble, 
has resumed her vaudeville route, which 
terminates at McVicker*s, Chicago, June 4. 

MORTON AND RUSSELL SIGNED 

Harry K. Morton ' and Zella Russell, 
who were with the Burlesque Review this 
season, have been signed by Jacobs and 
Jermon, Inc., for another three years, com- 
mencing next season. 



•TOLLIES" OPEN JUNE 11 

Following a week at the Apollo Theatre, 
Atlantic City, the 1917 edition of Ziegfeld'a 
"Follies" will open in New York Monday, 
June 11, at the New Amsterdam Theatre. 

HARTFORD THEATRE AGAIN UNION 

Haetford, May 12. — The Hartford The- 
atre, under the new Goldstein manage- 
ment, once more returns to the union, 
orchestra and all. 



D. P. STEWART AT PLATTSBURG 

Donald P. Stewart, of the Stewart 
Theatrical Shoe Company, has been sta- 
tioned at Plattsburg in the officers' re- 
serve corps. 



HATTIE BURKS LEAVES "WIDOWS" 

Hattie Barks has been compelled to 
leave the cast of- "His Little Widows." 
owing to illness, and her place in the 
company has been taken by Edith Day. 

BEN FOY COMPANY CLOSES 

Sbenandoha, Pa.. May 9. — Ben Foy's 
Musical Comedy Co. closed its fifth season 
last week, after playing for forty consecu- 
tive weeks. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



May 16, 1917 




BEACH HOUSES 

ALLY FOR 

BOOKING 

THEATRES TO EXCHANGE ACTS 

A conjunctive booking arrangement has 
been effected between the New Brighton 
Theatre at Brighton Beach; Keith'a The- 
atre, at Atlantic City, and Shea's Theatre, 
at Buffalo. It ia believed that, with such 
an alliance, all three homes will be en- 
abled to secure higher class bookings than 
could otherwise be managed. 

The agreement will be put into opera- 
tion next Monday, which is the opening 
date of the Brighton Beach bouse. 

Under the terms of the agreement, each 
act booked will have to play all three 
theatres. That is, an act's contract will 
call for an engagement of three consecu- 
tive weeks, to be divided into one week at 
each theatre. In this manner, these the- 
atres will get headline acts which they 
could not otherwise book in the Summer 
season. 

Offerings of a lighter nature will be 
booked for this trio of houses, in accord 
with the regular policy of the seashore 
theatres. 

Among those who have accepted the 
three-week contracts are Julia Arthur, 
Cecil Lean and Cleo Mayfleld, Joseph Sant- 
ley, Nat C. Goodwin. Carl Randall and 
Lucille Cavanaugb, Gertrude Hoffmann, 
Sam Bernard, Gus Van and Joe Schenck, 
Sallie Fisher, Natalie Alt, Eva Tanguay. 
Nan Halperin, Wellington Cross and Lois 
Josephine, Dorothy Jardon. Jessie Busley. 
Belle Baker, James Doyle and Harland 
Dixon. 



NEW HARRY HOLMAN ACT 

Harry Holman & Co. will appear in 
an act entitled "Pep," by Harry L. New- 
ton and Stephen Cbamplin, at Proctor's 
58th Street Theatre for the last half of this 
week, beginning to-morrow. There are 
three people in the act, which is destined 
for the two-a-day houses. 



OLCOTT LOST VOICE 

Charles Olcott retired from the bill at 
the Palace Theatre last Friday as a result 
of having lost his voice. Ed. Morton, who 
was appearing at the Orpheum Theatre.' 
Brooklyn, doubled on the houses for the re- 
mainder of the week. 



SHOW NEW ACT TOMORROW 

Leo Hoyfc Sam Hyams and Lucille 
Manion, who appeared in Jacob & Jennon 
shows on the Columbia Circuit this season 
are breaking; in a new vaudeville act. They 
will appear at the Olympic Theatre. Brook- 
lyn, tomorrow. 



RTVOLI ON LOEW TIME 

Caesar Rivoli, who recently returned 
from a tour of the "Western vaudeville time, 
has obtained a route over the Loew Circuit 
through Jack Mandel. opening at the Hip- 
podrome, Baltimore, next Monday. 

BROWN & TAYLOR HAVE NEW ACT 

Brown & Taylor will appear in a new 
singing novelty at Proctor's Twenty-third 
Street Theatre the last half of this week, 
beginning to-morrow. 



DAYTON VAUDEVILLE STARTS 

Datton, O- May 14. — The Keith house 
here starts summer vaudeville next Monday, 
with the usual change of program twice a 
week. 



NEW LIANA CARRERA ACT 

Liana Carrera wilF-break in a new single 
act at the Amphion Theatre, Brooklyn, 
next Monday. She is a daughter of Anna 
Held. 



VAUDEVILLE AT BURBANK 

Los Angeles, CaL, May 1L — The Bur- 
bank will reopen next Monday, as a con- 
tinuous performance house, playing vaude- 
ville and pictures, from 1 to 11 P. M., 
with all seats at 10c. The theatre has 
been taken on a long lease by a company 
headed by S. Morton Conn, who is also 
manager. 



CLIVE HAS NEW PLAYLET 

E. E. Clive expects to shortly conclude 
his engagement in "One Good Turn," and 
commence rehearsals of a new vehicle by 
Dion Titheridge, entitled "Good Lawd" 
which he will present the forepart of July. 
There will be four people in this act, which 
is the same number as is used in his present 
offering. 



BRIGHTON BILL COMPLETED 

The bill which will open the New 
Brighton Theatre next Monday will include 
Frank La Dent, Golet, Harris & Morey, 
Hong Kong Mysteries, Bronson & Bald- 
win, Clark & Hamilton, Willie Solar, 
Doree's Celebrities, Oyer & Faye and Rath 
Brothers. 



BERG HAS THREE NEW ACTS 

B. D. Berg has in preparation three new 
acts "From Quakertown to Broadway," 
"One Heir for a Night" and "The Lady in 
the Shoe." Joe Burrowes, who is under 
exclusive contract with Mr. Berg, wrote 
the music for all three. 



EDDIE O'CONNOR TO STAR 

Hay den (Eddie) O'Connor has been en- 
gaged by John W. Smith to star next sea- 
son in Jack Le Elmore Forcum's new play, 
"The Tellow Sin." This will be O'Connor's 
first starring tour. 



TRIO TO SUMMER IN MUSKEGON 

Roberts, Stuart and Roberts will spend 
their Summer at Muskegon, Mich. They 
opened Monday at Erie, and will tour the 
Miles houses, closing in Milwaukee June 9. 



"WORLD'S DANCERS" HALT 

"The World's Dancers," an act which 
was expected to go to the coast for an 
extensive tonr, is laying off owing to an 
injury sustained by Marie Fanchonetti, who 
is featured in the turn. 



HOLMES AND WELLS REST 

After a successful tonr of the West, the 
vaudeville team of Holmes and Wells are 
resting for the summer at their new home 
in Floral Park, Long Island. 



MANN HAS NEW ACT 

Louis Manu has proi ~rH a new vehicle 
for vaudeville a.->r! i < giving it its initial 
tryout at Proctor's Theatre, Newark, the 
first half of this week. 



HUGH CAMERON FOR VAUDE. 

Hugh Cameron will soon invade vaude- 
ville with a vehicle which he has just ac- 
cepted. He was with "Canary Cottage." 



NEW SHERIDAN ACT READY 
Frank Sheridan & Co.. in a new act, 
will be at Proctor's Theatre. Tonkers, the 
last half of next week. 



BINGHAM & WILLIAMS HAVE ACT 

Olive Bingham and Garnet Williams are 
rehearsing a new comedy playlet for vaude- 
ville. 



SHOW NEW ACT NEXT WEEK 

Albertina Rash, with her ten coryphees, 
will appear in a new dancing act at 
Proctor's Newark Theatre, next Monday. 



BERGERE HAS ANOTHER PLAY 

Valerie Bergere and her company are 
rehearsing a new playlet which is a satire 
on the vampire type of woman. 



N. V. A. PICKING 

CELEBRATION 

PROGRAM 

HUNDREDS OF ACTS OFFERED 



The selection of vaudevillians who will 
perform at the Hippodrome on Sunday 
night, June 3, when the National Vaude- 
ville Artists, Inc., will give a monster 
benefit to celebrate their first anniversary 
and to raise money for their benevolent 
funds, is well under way, and, judging 
from the roster of names, the entertain- 
ment promises to eclipse anything of its 
kind ever before attempted. 

Hundreds of vaudeville artistB have 
volunteered their services to the commit- 
tee of arrangements and the only diffi- 
cult task that the committee has had to 
face has been to decide upon which offers 
to accept. 

One of the first acts to be definitely 
placed on the program was Odiva*. Hou- 
dini was also among the first to have his 
services accepted. 

Although the program has not been 
definitely decided upon as yet, a tenta- 
tive list of acts that are practically cer- 
tain to appear are: Eddie Leonard, Eva 
Tanguay, Bob Albright, Bert Fitzgibbon, 
Stan Stanley, Eddie Foy, May Irwin, 
Harry Carroll, Grace De Max, Mrs. Gene 
Hughes, Clark & Bergman, Hugh Herbert 
and Gus Edwards. 

Tickets are already on sale, and the 
advance purchases are said to be beyond 
the committee's expectations. In fact, no 
event of the kind ever had a better outlook. 



ACTORS' HOSPITAL OPENS 

Chicago, May 11. — The opening of the 
American Theatrical Hospital today for the 
reception of patients, was the culmination 
of several years of indefatigable work on 
the part of Dr. Max Thorek, the well 
known surgeon of this city. It is the only 
institution of its kind devoted entirely to 
the care of members of the amusement pro- 
fession, and all persons in its ranks may be 
cared for, receiving the best of medical 
treatment and nursing without regard to 
their financial condition. It is intended by 
Dr. Thorek to be a haven for professionals 
in all that the name implies. The hospital 
has been furnished for the most part by 
actors. 



ALTOONA THEATRE CLOSES DOORS 

Ai/rooNA, Pa., May 10.— The Cozy The- 
atre, a motion picture house on Union Ave- 
nue and Twenty-fourth Street, which M. 
O. Omer has conducted for several years, 
closed its doors at the show presented last 
Saturday night. This is the second M. P. 
theatre to close in this city within a few 
weeks, the Pastime having closed several 
weeks ago. 



MAY THOMPSON OUT OF CAST 

May Thompson, of "You're in Love" 
Company, was compelled to retire from 
the cast last Saturday night because of 
an injury she sustained while dancing. 
Betty Stivers, her understudy, win replace 
Miss Thompson during her absence. 



MISS MIDDLETON AIDS FUND 
Lillian Middleton, daughter of M. T. Mid- 
dleton, general manager of the Gus Hill 
enterprises, is chief of the Bureau of In- 
formation at the Actors' Fnnd Fair in 
Grand Central Palace. 



COCOANUT REVUE NAMED 
The Summer revue which will succeed 
"Dance and Grow Thin" in Cocoanut Grove 
win be called "A Day at Palm Beach." 



CHOOSE NEW OPERA OFFICERS 

At the annual meeting of the Metro- 
politan Opera and Realty Company, held 
last week, Augustus D. Juilliard was re- 
elected president; Henry A. C. Taylor, 
vice-president, and G. O. Havens, treas- 
urer. They, George F. Baker and G. H. 
Warren, were elected members of the ex- 
ecutive committee. The members of the 
Board of Directors for the coming year are 
August Belmont, R. Fulton Cutting, 
Luther Kountze, Ogden Mills, J. P. Mor- 
gan, W. K. Vanderbilt, George P. Wet- 
more and H. P. Whitney. 



MURRAY GIVES BEEFSTEAK 

Fred Murray, head of the New York 
Calcium Light Co., was host to some three 
hundred of his friends early Sunday morn- 
ing at his annual beefsteak, which he gave 
in one of his stock rooms at 449 West 
Fifty-third Street. Among his guests 
were Felix Adler, Harrison Fisher, George 
Fisher, Barney Granville, Jim Montgom- 
ery, Fred Belcher and David Watson. 



GOODWIN TO PLAY SHAKESPEARE 

Boston, May 11. — Nat C. Goodwin wiU 
appear in a revival of "The Taming of the 
Shrew" during B. P. O. E. convention 
week in Boston, July 9. It is planned to 
give five night and two matinee perform- 
ances. It is said that Goodwin will re- 
ceive $5,000 salary. 

ANGL1N REVIVES PLAY 

Margaret Anglin is appearing In a re- 
vival of "Green Stockings" at the Stand- 
ard Theatre this week. In her company 
are Alfred Lunt, Cyril Courtney, Maud 
Durand, Alfred Fisher, Anita Lawrence, 
Margaret Ferguson, Mary Grey Hollings- 
worth Pett and Howard Lindsey. 



ROSENBERG GETS MINERS 

The Criterion Theatre Company, of 
which Walter Rosenberg is president, has 
secured a lease from the Henry C. Miner 
estate of Miner's Eighth Avenue Theatre, 
which is to run five years, beginning in 
September. The house will be remodeled 
and open with a feature picture policy. 



TO DINE VETERAN MANAGER 

A number of professional friends will 
tender Major Charles Rice, the veteran 
manager, a birthday banquet at the Wald- 
orf on May 24, to commemorate the begin- 
ning of the Major's eighty-first year. Ed- 
ward E. Rice wUl have charge of the 
arrangements. 



"UNBORN CHILD" STOPPED 

Salem, Mass., May 12. — The city author- 
ities here refused to allow Manager Harry 
Katzes, of the Empire theatre, to present 
the play, "Her Unborn Child," in his house 
this week. In its stead, the Empire play- 
ers appeared in "The Road to Happiness." 



NORA BAYES, INC., CHARTERED 

Axbanv, N. Y., May 12. — Nora Bayes. 
Inc., was chartered this week with a 
capital of $1,000. Philip Hersch, Mary 
F. McCarthy and Rae Hartman are the 
incorporators named. The company will 
produce and exploit theatrical attractions. 



MABELL ESTELLE RECOVERED 

Mabell Estelle, who hns been ill in a 
hospital for several weeks, has recovered 
sufficiently to return to her home. She ex- 
pects to tonr next season under Arthur 
Alston's management. 



ORDYNSKI IS ENGAGED 

Richard Ordynski has been engaged as 
stage director of the Metropolitan Opera 
Company for next season, replacing Jules 
Speck, who resigned. 



FROHMAN GETS NEW PLAY 

The Charles Frohman Co. has accepted 
a new play by Victor Jacob! and Harry 
B. Smith, the co-authors of "Sybil." 



May 16, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 




RIVERSIDE 



There is an abundance of comedy in this 
week's bill, Stan Stanley, Eddie Foy and 
the seven younger Foys, Pat Rooney, and 
Mason and Heeler each contributing a big 
share, and as a result the large Monday 
afternoon audience was kept in continual 
good humor. 

Mazie King, assisted by E. E. Marinl, 
presented her dance creations, and was 
well received. The "Danse Militaire" Dum- 
ber, which ended the act, was particularly 
well executed and pleased greatly. 

Maleta Bonconi, an European violinist, 
rendered a number of classical selections 
and displayed a fine easy style, excellent 
technique and a bread smooth tone. Her 
rendition of Kreisler's "Caprice Viennois" 
and the "Polonaise Vieur temps" was ex- 
cellent. 

Stan Stanley's Trio started the comedy 
portion of the bill, and soon had the en- 
tire audience with him. He is an excellent 
comedian, so good, in fact, that one 
wondera why he bothers with the bouncing 
table or the display of his athletic ability. 
Nevertheless, bis assistants and the man- 
ner in which the act is presented makes 
of it a decided novelty. 

Frank Crnmit plays the guitar, the 
ukelele, tells a few stories and sings 
snatches of the old songs popular twenty 
years or more ago. He has a light but 
pleasing voice and has the art of rendition 
down to a fine point. His singing of 
"Bedelia," "Daisy Bell" and "Bill Bailey" 
was received with snch enthusiasm that 
one is '-''easily led to believe that the old 
songB are, after all, the best He is not, 
however, a ballad singer, and the "Indi- 
ana" song slowed his act up very per- 
ceptibly. The substitution of a novelty or 
character number in its place would help 
him wonderfully. 

The Eddie Foy act improves with each 
showing, and the talented Foy youngsters 
are progressing so rapidly in their work 
that one can easily see great possibilities 
for several of them. The act, in addition 
to being an exceptionally clever singing 
and dancing novelty, is building up so fast 
that if it be possible to keep it intact for 
a year or so it is bound to develop into a 
sensation. 

Pat Rooney and Marion Bent opened in- 
termission with their second edition of 
"At the News Stand." There appears to 
be little difference between the second 
and first edition of the now well known 
act, with the exception that Pat has a 
new song or two, and is introducing a 
•couple of new jokes. It makes little dif- 
ference, however, how he changes bis act 
around, it is his dancing that appeals, and 
in that feature he excels. Some clever 
fooling with a broom at the finish was 
responsible for many laughs. Miss Bent 
is wearing some new and stunning cos- 
tumes, and her singing and dancing help 
the act greatly. 

Homer Mason and Marguerite Keeler, in 
Porter Emerson Browne's one-act playlet 
"'Married," received a big share of the ap- 
plause and laughter of the afternoon. It 
is extremely doubtful if a sketch with 
more impossible situations was ever writ- 
ten, yet the clever dialogue and the ability 
of the principals have made it one of the 
standard attractions. At the very begin- 
ning of the sketch 'the author assembles in 
a hotel room, a woman who for ten days 
has been suffering from an attack of 
aphasia, and has no recollection of what 
she has been doing, a man who has jnst 
escaped from a sanitarinm. for inebriates, 
and a minister who is a kleptomaniac. 

Van and Schenck, late of the "Century 
Girl." presented their familiar piano and 
singing act, and met with their usual suc- 
cess. A number of new songs are being 
sung which pleased greatly. An Italian 
and an Irish number were particularly 
good, and they finished with "It's a Long, 
Long Time Since Tve Been Home," which 
they featured throughont their Century 
Theatre engagement. W. V. 



SHOW REVIEWS 

(Continued on pas** a anil IS) 



PALACE 

Outside of two acts this week, the bill 
is mostly on the dance order, opening with 
eccentric dancing and closing with Russian 
folk steps. 

Eva Tanguay topped the bill and did 
nine songs and two recitations at the mat- 
inee, holding them in nicely in the next to 
closing spot. One of the big features of 
Miss Tanguay's act, outside of her well- 
known eccentric methods, is the playing of 
the trombone and clarinet by two special 
members of the orchestra. They filled in 
the interludes while she was making her 
changes and, with a sort of a Jazz ar- 
rangement of music, did much to enhance 
the value of the torn. 

The big hit of the show at the matinee 
was. W. J. Reilly, the gunner of the 
U. S. S. Michigan, who, after being in- 
troduced by two others, swept everything 
before him with his pianologue. The act 
is fully reviewed under "New Acts" in 
this issue. 

After the picture, Herman and Shirley 
opened with a skit wherein George Her- 
man had an excellent opportunity to dis- 
play his remarkable ability as an eccentric 
dancer and some contortion work. Miss 
Shirley assists with dialogue, nicely de- 
livered. 

In the second spot were Al. Gerard and 
Sylvia Clark, who scored a pronounced hit 
with their clever singing and dancing skit, 
introducing several "nut" bits, well 
handled and put over in a classy style. 
They could have added an encore had 
they cared to, as the applause was suf- 
ficient for a recall. 

The audience liked Miss Clark's quaint 
nut syle. Gerard sang a ballad most 
pleasingly. 

Evan-Burrows Fontaine, assisted by 
Tom Rector and a company of six clever 
dancers, scored decidedly with their flashy 
dancing pantomimes, running from the 
opening Hawaiian dances to the classic 
East Indian novelty. The act ran 
smoothly, and the girls looked exceptionally 
well. Miss Fontaine has grown a bit' 
since last seen here and her work, as 
usual, was, individually, up to her high 
standard. . 

J. Francis Dooley and Corinne Sales 
occupied the fourth spot, and had little 
trouble in convincing all the folks they 
had the goods. The act is called "Will 
Xer, Jim?" as was suggested by the writer 
more than a year ago. Several new songs 
went well, and the talk was built for 
laughs and got them. 

Louise Dresser and company closed the 
first part with an act written by Alfred 
Francis Hopkins, entitled "For Country," 
which is fully reviewed under "New Acts" 
in this issue. 

After intermission, .W. J. Reilly cleaned 
up with his pianologue, and then came the 
Arnaut Brothers, who did not do so well 
with their eccentric tumbling and dancing 
bits, although they were held over from 
last week. One new bit, wherein the boys 
play mandolins, was the only new thing in 
the act, although a new set of music 
would help things out greatly. The 
whistling finish let this team off easy. 

Eva Tanguay and her songs, wardrobe 
and assistants at the musical instruments, 
played all over the place, and went great. 
She occupied the stage thirty-one minutes, 
and held the crowd well in band. 

Ivan Bankoff and Lola Girlie closed the 
show with their well known dancing act, 
which was last seen here when it was in- 
terpolated in an act produced by Madeline 
Harrison. As a closing turn. Bankoff and 
Girlie showed good taste and sense by 
rushing through their work at top speed 
and accomplishing it all to big applause at 
the finish. s. L. H. 



AMERICAN 

An all 'round good bill was Manager 
Potsdam's offering for the first half of 
the week. 

Commodore Tom, an educated pony, 
held down number one position, and his 
trainer put him through an unusual rou- 
tine of stunts for an equine, lie was 
started off with a little menage stuff, in- 
cluding stepping and dancing. Then he 
counted, spelled words and picked out 
colors. For a finish, he played a few bars 
of "The Blue Bells of Scotland" and 
"Home Sweet Home." 

Sam Davis and Laura Walker, a colored 
team, in "A Lesson in Dancing," captured 
rounds of applause. Miss Walker sang a 
couple of numbers and she and her part- 
ner sang together and well deserved ap- 
proval was given them. But the real fea- 
ture of the act is the dancing of Davis. 
The pair are hard workers and earned the 
hearty recognition accorded them. 

Adele Archer and company presented a 
novely act entitled "Through the Mirror." 
It is a little skit representing a star in 
her dressing room. The scene is boxed in 
three, with wide doorways right and left 
of centre. At center stage is a small- 
round table, on which are a lamp, a hand 
mirror and a few toilet articles. Through 
the doors right and left are seen duplicate 
tables. Miss Archer sings several songs, 
with two changes of costume, and, as she 
approaches the table, cer.ter, what appears 
to be ber reflection in a mirror approaches 
each table showing through the doorways. 
The costumes of Miss Archer's two 
women assistants are exact duplicates of 
her own, and so well do they copy her ac- 
tions that the illusion of mirror reflection 
is as near perfection as possible. At the 
finish the two assistants come out of their 
respective doorways and they close with 
a trio. The act was a decided hit. 

There are two men and a woman in the 
act billed as Barton and Hill. It opens 
as a pianologue with one of the men at a 
piano and the woman singing. After two 
songs the pianist is talking to the audi- 
ence when he is interrupted by the en- 
trance of a man dressed as a stage hand. 
After some coaxing the "stage hand" is 
induced to join the act and makes good 
with a song. For the finish he sings a 
duet with the woman with their partner 
at the piano. The act scored heavily. 

Long Tack Sam and his company of 
Chinese, four men and a woman, pre- 
sented his act of magic, contortion plate 
spinning, etc., and was accorded most 
hearty recognition. Long Tack Sam is one 
of the most versatile performers of his 
race known to our stage. He performs 
feats of legerdemain, does gymnastic and 
contortion stunts, and does so much all 
'round work that it would be difficult to 
say at which he is the most adept. The 
various members of his company are capi- 
tal performers and the act ranks with the 
very best in its class. 

Marsella Johnson presented an excel- 
lent singing act in which she is assisted 
by a man at the piano. She sang four 
songs and her pianist rendered two instru- 
mental solos. The act was well liked. 

"His Lucky Day" is a "crook" sketch, 
played by four men, which tells the story 
of two crooks outwitting two other ones, 
getting the ."swag" which the others had 
gotten together and then handing them 
over to the police. 

The Elks Trio, two men and a woman, 
presented a singing turn which earned an 
encore. 

The Three Aitkens, two men and a 
woman in their eccentric acrobatic and 
roller skating act, scored well in last posi- 
tion. e. •vp. 



COLONIAL 

The Colonial lived up to its reputation 
on Monday afternoon of being the bouse 
of cold audiences. 

Selma Braatz started the show with a 
juggling act, which makes a splendid 
opener. It is rather novel to see a woman 
doing a single in this style of act, and Miss 
Braatz acquits herself wonderfully well. 
Ber feats are unique and well done. The 
juggling of colored lights, with which she 
closes her tum, is very effective, and 
brings an excellent act to a snappy 
finish. 

The Three Avolos, in the second spot, 
worked hard, billed as "Europe'* Xylo- 
phonists." Their march numbers were 
played best. 

The Three Bobs came too soon after 
Miss Braatz, with another dumb act. The 
trio did not work aa well as usual and 
missed catches entirely too often. They 
should be more careful in their work. It 
is their clever dog that makes this a 
feature act. The canine seems to have 
human intelligence in picking up the 
Indian clubs and in doing his several other 
tricks. 

Let it be said for Loney Haskell, that 
he left nothing undone in an effort to gain 
applause from a seemingly handcuffed audi- 
ence. When his gags didn't seem to get 
over, he resorted to complimenting the 
audience, telling the Colonial patrons 
what a fine bnncb they are, and how ap- 
preciative this particular audience seemed 
to be! 

But the audience knew better, aad it 
was not until he recited a patriotic poem 
at the end of his turn that it unbended 

That part of bis talk in which he 
praises his audience is too obviously an 
appeal for applause, and should be elim- 
inated. HU gags, for the most part, have 
been heard ttme and again. Such ones as 
his having seen three Americans on a 
Bronx subway, and that going to Brooklyn 
means that one is dead to the world, have 
seen service too often. 

Emmett J. Welch, with his company of 
eight, presents a polished act and his 
Minstrel Revision" scored jnst before in- 
termission. The gag about getting pneu- 
monia from the swiftness of the blow and 
the one about the human race, should both 
be shelved, for they were good in their 
day. Otherwise, the act is sure fire and 
has every quality that can be desired of 
a minstrel turn. 

The quartette renders some excellent 
harmony in this turn, with particular 
praise due to the tenor. Welch sings very 
Pleasingly, but keeps himself rather in 
the background, and the audience would 
have enjoyed hearing him sing another 
song. 

After intermission, Grace Carlisle and 

Jules Romer presented their high class 
"™? °? crin *- " J «wt a Song at Twi- 
light This act Is very artistically put 
on and the numbers are rendered in a way 
that is bound to please. 

Adele Rowland received a good band 
upon her entrance. However, she was 
disappointing. Miss Rowland has consider- 
able personality and probably depends too 
much upon this asset to get her over. She 
should work harder and add one more 
gingery song to her act. 

.rJ aae Conn eHy and Players offered 
rBetty's Courtship," a comedy of modern 
life, by Erwin Connelly, who is also in the 
cast. The lines of this offering are bright 
and snappy and delivered well by the 
players. Miss Connelly makes a charming 
stage picture, and the act, which is rather 
new, should find success on any bm. 

J. Francis Dooley and Corinne 8ales 
closed and stopped the show with their 
musical absurdity. "Will Ter. Jim?" De- 
spite the fact that most of the material in 
this act is eetting old and several of the 
gags are also heard In other acta, the 
team found the oing very easy. Miss 
Sales has a most likable personality, and 
the pair work well together. H O 



8 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



May 16, 1917 




ROYAL 

This excellent bill at the Royal was 
wrapped and tied up for Bert Fitzgibbon, 
who walked away with the show, com- 
pletely stopping the bill with his well- 
known nut style of comedy. Fitzgibbon 
was never funnier than on Monday night, 
and his gags, business and songs all went 
over with an equal bang. 

He was assisted by his wife, who sings 
fairly and dances excellently. Her dance 
stood out on its own merits and almost 
Tied Fitzgibbon for honors. 

Fitzgibbon is a living illustration of 
the fact that no one is ever as good as 
the original, and the manifold number 
of nut comedians who have tried now 
and again to copy Fitzgibbon have failed, 
utterly, by contrast. 

Close upon Fitzgibbon's heels for 
honors was Alexander MacFayden, the 
pianist — a passing from the ridiculous to 
the sublime. A straight piano act is about 
as difficult to put over successfully as 
anything can be, and yet MacFayden was 
forced to respond to a number of encores. 
He followed his usual routine of selections 
and pleased equally with* classics and 
rags, although the former is assuredly 
his field. 

After the Hearst-Fathe News Pictorial, 
the show received a fast start at the 
hands of Sterling and Marguerite, whose 
"Athletic Surprise" will be reviewed un- 
der New Acts. 

In the second spot, Dick Henry and Car- 
rie Adelaide introduced a very novel 
dancing act. Henry's complete changing 
of wardrobe from necktie to shoes, while 
dancing, is the feature of the act, and 
gained deserved applause. 

Hilda Thomas and Lou Hall got a lot 
of laughs out of their familiar skit, "She's 
a Traveling Man." Hall, as an eccentric 
rube, does some good work, and Miss 
Thomas, as a corset saleswoman, plays 
her role well. The Caruso burlesque, at 
the end of the skit, should be particularly 
commended. 

Nick Hnfford and Dell Chain, who style 
themselves "two loose paces from the 
book of fun," cleaned up with their ma- 
terial and will be reviewed at greater 
length under New Acts. 

The first half of the bill was closed by 
Mrs. Gene Hughes and company in Edgar 
Allan Woolf's satirical comedy, "Gowns." 
Although the Royalites care but little for 
playlets as a general run, "Gowns" proved 
to be an exception and was accorded a 
very flattering hand at its conclusion. 
The lines in it are among Woolf's best 
and are excellently rendered by those in 
the cast. 

Mrs. Gene Hughes as Mme. Kelly cre- 
ates an interesting type and leaves noth- 
ing wanting in her portrayal. 

Charles Cartmell and Laura Harris 
scored a deserved hit in their singing and 
dancing skit, "Golfing with Cupid." This 
pair are the neatest kind of steppers, and 
their coif dance is a gem of its kind. 
Misb Harris makes up well as a boy, bnt 
the last part of the turn has not quite 
the same amount of class as the opening 
portion, and it might be well to cut down 
a bit toward the end of the act. 

The third member of the act, who is 
entitled to his name on the program (al- 
though it does not appear), scores an 
individual hit with the little he has to do. 

Adelaide Hermann's "The Haunted Stu- 
dio" followed Bert Fitzgibbon and brought 
the show to a slow end by being entirely 
too monotonous and too long for this 
style of act A series of mysterious dis- 
appearances of a pretty girl form the 
basis of the act, but the stunt of making 
persons disappear has been done to death. 

Evidently realizing this, Adelaide Her- 
mann has endeavored to dress her act 
somewhat differently and has surrounded 
the disappearances with a great deal of 
pantomime. However, this becomes very 
tiresome, and the act should be est down 
to about half of its pre sen t running time. 

H. G. 



FIFTH AVENUE 

A well arranged bill of pleasing acts was 
Manager Quaid's ottering the first half 
of the week, and the usual capacity house 
was in evidence at the first performance on 
Monday. 

Mabel Burke, with an illustrated song, 
had number one position, and with three 
plants in the audience was called upon to 
respond to an encore. 

The Great Mankichi and company, a 
Japanese trio of two men and a woman, 
scored a pronounced hit Mankichi is a 
remarkable foot juggler. His opening 
stunt is done with a paper umbrella, and 
the feats he does with this light object are 
many and varied. Then follows some bar- 
rel juggling and spinning, in which he is 
assisted by the woman, who is also an 
adept 

The third partner then spins a large 
brass top while he does some expert 
juggling. The two men then Juggle with 
two spinning tops and a dozen strips of 
American flags, which, dropping from two 
rings hung in the flies, furnish a hurrah 
finish. 

Muriel Morgan and Joe Armstrong 
were seen in their skit "A Thin Romance." 
Talking and singing constitute the act. 
The patter Is good, and they put it over 
well. Miss Morgan has a pleasing per- 
sonality, and is one of the best comediennes 
on the vaudeville stage. She sings a 
comedy song and a ballad equally well, 
getting the most possible ont of each. 
Armstrong is also a most capable per- 
former, possessing a good stage presence 
and an excellent voice. The audience liked 
their work so well that they were not 
allowed to quit until they had answered 
the applause with an encore. 

"Bon Voyage," a musical act in seven 
scenes snd employing the services of three 
principals and a chorus of six girls, is 
reviewed under "New Acts." 

Another act which scored heavily was 
that presented by Marguerite FarreH. She 
is a natural entertainer and a top-notch 
character comedienne. She makes three 
changes of costume, appearing first as a 
modern soubrette. Then she appears as 
a show girl and sings a French song, with 
a delightful accent. Then, in the hoop- 
skirts of the early '60's, she sings a homely 
song and, as a finish, appears in a dress 
with a green effect snd renders a Celtic 
song with a pleasing touch of Irish 
brogue. Between the two last mentioned 
changes the time is taken up with motion 
pictures of her in her dressing room making 
the change of costume. 

A little company of four men and a 
woman were seen in John B. Hymer's 
comedy "The Night Boat." The scenes 
show the pier of the Hndson River Line 
and the deck of a steamer, with the out- 
side staterooms visible. The little story 
tells of a young married woman, in New 
York for a week, who passes herself oft as 
a widow, in order to gratify her desire to 
carry on flirtations- An old man and two 
youths fall into her net and all three take 
the night boat for Albany, on wbich the 
yonng woman is also a passenger, and of 
which her husband is captain. There is 
good material in the skit, and it is well 
handled by the players. 

Bert Savoy and Jay Brennan, in their 
skit "After the Matinee," came in for a 
full share of approval They are capable 
performers, the female impersonator being 
particularly clever, and have capital ma- 
terial which they pnt over to the best ad- 
vantage. They had the audience with them 
from start to finish. Their well-known 
lines "Fm glad you asked me" and "You 
don't know the half of it dearie." scored 
laughs. 

Ted Lorraine and Frances Pritchard in 
"Musical Comedy Bits," sang and danced 
In regulation cabaret style. They danced 
well together, and Bliss Pritchard gave a 
solo number. They also sang several num- 
bers. They were well liked, and in re- 
sponse to hearty applause took an encore. 

E. W. 



CITY 

The Martians offer what they term "The 
Astronomer's Dream of Mars." It is a 
contortionist offering, the man doing the 
performing with alight assistance from the 
girl. The setting of the turn is particu- 
larly worthy of mention. 

Fox and Mayo, in a piano and song act, 
went very big. They are a duo of clever 
entertainers, possessing the knack of put- 
ting their songB over. 

"Rich Girl — Poor Girl" is reviewed 
under "New Acts." 

The first issue of Universal Current 
Events was shown here, the news being 
told in newspaper form, in addition to the 
pictures. 

Wayne and the Warren Girls present a 
very pleasing skit the action of which is 
supposed to take place on board a yacht 
The songs were all well rendered, and one 
of the girls, who plays the comedienne, 
always managed to get the laughs. 

Lew Hawkins, black-face comedian, got 
a laugh now and then with bis somewhat 
lengthy monologue. There were too many 
ancient jokes in it But the patriotic 
song at the conclusion was sure to get the 
applause. 

"Oh! Doctor," a musical comedy offer- 
ing, was too long to be interesting. One 
of the men in the act says "This has gone 
far enough," and the audience seemed to 
agree with him. There are eight girls em- 
ployed in the chorus, one girl principal 
and two men. As is generally the case 
in offerings of this kind, the singing Is 
poor, more attention being paid to the 
costuming of the act than to the voices. 

Mary Melville and George Rule were 
only fairly well received here. The work 
of Miss Melville dominates. The song she 
sings about being a stenographer was dis- 
tasteful, and the act would be the better 
for its elimination. 

The Randow Trio closed with acrobatic 
stunts. g. W. 



JEFFERSON 

Musical acts dominated this bill and 
pleased Monday afternoon's audience. 

Edwards and Louise have an attractive 
offering in their "A Vaudeville Surprise." 
The act won a good share of applause, 
especially the final stunt of the man run- 
ning up and down the aisle balancing the 
girl in a chair on his head. 

Thomas and Craddock, a colored team 
of entertainers, got a big reception with 
their song and dance offerings. Thomas 
has a good voice, and rendered his songs 
to satisfaction, while Craddock got the 
lanfrhs with his comedy talk. 

"The New Minister," a miniature 
musical comedy, was rather diverting, the 
man playing the role of the new minister, 
furnishing most of the laughs. 

Howard and Ross gave a clever perform- 
ance on banjos, the man juggling and 
playing one, two and three at the same 
time, which won the approbation of the 
audience. There are really two distinct 
parts to this act the second being echoes 
from grand opera, in which the man plays 
the banjo and the woman renders operatic 
selections. They received tremendous ap- 
plause for each offering. 

Pine and Wood, in a song and piano 
act pleased. The only discordant note of 
the act was the song by the man about 
being so sby. which should be eliminated or 
modified. - 

Homer Lind and company please' as 
much as ever In "The Music Teacher." 

Manning. Knoll and Feeley were a dis- 
appointment The Hebrew comedian was 
an offensive caricature, and were it not 
for the patriotic song at the finish, the act 
would not have received the applause it 
did. 

The Psllos Bros, closed the show with 
their acrobatic feats. One of the brothers 
balances poles on his shoulders while the 
other performs on them. He must say his 
prayers before each performance, for it 
looked pretty risky. R. W. 



U. S. BELLES OPEN 

SUMMER STOCK 

AT THE OLYMPIC 

Uncle Sam's Belles is the opening stock 
burlesque production of Roehm and 
Richards, with James Barton as the 
featured comedian. 

There are twenty-four girls in the 
chorus, and they line up well with the 
principals on the stage. 

The numbers went over well on Monday 
afternoon, but in the bits and comedy the 
actors occasionally were slow. This will 
no doubt right itself after a show or two. 

The company is well selected. Barton 
is thoroughly at home in his tramp make- 
up and eccentricities. Bert Wiggen was 
his hard-working assistant and Francis T. 
Reynolds played a good straight 

Florence Tanner was in the prima donna 
role and sang the several selections allotted 
her in good style. 

Tillie Barton gave life to the ingenue 
role, and showed well as a leader of 
numbers. 

Daisy May far was well placed as the 
soubrette, and made good In her songs, 
also in several character bits. 

Sol. A. Lacks and Robert Lansing com- 
pleted the cast. 

The chorus includes Ethel Reed, Irene 
Gordon, Margaret Williams, Alice Root 
Lillian Marshall, Ruth Rosemond, . Molly 
Nelson, Margaret Howard, Vera Duval, 
Lillian Moore. Vivian West Helen Russell. 
Ruth Gale, Margaret Anderson, Margaret 
Miller, Bert Kritton, Loretta Duffy, 
Mazie Irving. 

"The Girl in the Bath Tub" is an- 
nounced for next week. 



MAIDS OF AMERICA 
CLOSE THEIR SEASON 
AT THE COLUMBIA 

Another repeater of the season at the 
Columbia is the "Maids of America" show, 
which drew a good house on Monday after- 
noon. 

"The Girl from Nowhere" remains un- 
changed. Norma Bell is the new girl, and 
her work was grestly appreciated. 

Al. K. Hall, the featured comedian, was 
well remembered, and his partner, Bobby 
Barry, also had good opportunities to 
make good. Mary Mack and Alfaretta 
Symonds looked and acted in good form. 
Harvey Brooks, Joseph Weston, Clarence 
Jennings snd Joey Stoole completed the 
cast 

Weston and Symonds offered a nice 
specialty, as did Jennings, Henry and 
Stoole. The. Hawaiian number was a big 
winner. 

The Hip, Hip, Hooray Girls win open 
next Monday. 



DOROTHY FOI.I.IS VERY ILL 

Dorothy Follis, last seen in "The Beau- 
tiful Unknown," on its brief tour, was 
removed last Saturday from her home to 
Miss O'Brien's sanitarium, this city. Her 
condition is considered serious. 



SANTLEY SIGNS FOR "OH BOY" 

Joseph Santley has signed for the special 
"Oh, Boy" company, which goes to the 
La Salle Theatre, Chicago, next season, 
for an indefinite season. Ivy Sawyer win 
also play a leading role 

ENGAGED FOR "COLLEGE WIDOW** 

Gengie O'Ramey has signed with Coin- 
stock and Gest for a leading role in the 
musical version of "The College Widow," 
which they will present next Fall. 

WALTER HALE IMPROVING 

Walter Hale, who underwent a surgical 
operation In the .New York Hospital nearly 
a fortnight ago is announced to be making 
a satisfactory recovery. 



May 16, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 




LOUISE DRESSER AND CO. 

Theatre — Palace. 

Style— Playlet. 

Time — Seventeen minute*. 

Setting — Full stage special. 

In returning to vaudeville after an 
experience in musical comedy and suffer- 
ing with a broken wrist. Miss Dresser 
has chosen a playlet based on the theme 
of the great war on the other aide, • The 
setting is a pretty interior kitchen, and 
she dresses as a peasant girl, while the 
two men assisting her give her excellent 
support. 

The scene opens with the girl sitting 
down to her evening repast, while await- 
ing the return of her grandmother. A 
stranger enters who pleads for a bowl of 
soup. The ensuing dialogue reveals the 
fact that the girl is alone, and that 
the soldier, who claims to be a dragoon 
and a good fighter, falls in love with and 
kisses her. She manages to escape from 
his embrace, grabs a stiletto and threat- 
ens to kill herself if he touches her. 

The other spy then enters, and the 
plot is further unfolded by the story of 
the planting of the dynamite, and that 
it is to be exploded shortly from an 
electrical equipment in. that very room. 
Evidently, the girl overhears the conver- 
sation, because, when she enters again, 
she makes overtures to the dragoon and 
tells him she loves a fighter. In close 
embrace, they enter her room. 

Drums are then heard off stage, and 
the marching ■ of troops grows louder, 
until the door bursts open and the 
second spy enters and calls for the 
dragoon, who comes quickly out of the 
room partly dressed. The spy shoots the 
dragon as a traitor, for the girl baa 
evidently saved the troops of her 
country at the price of her honor. 

The playlet is far from being a "War- 
brides." The acting is splendid, but the 
theme is something which a man would 
not like to have his sister, sweetheart, 
mother or even wife, hear. ' If there is 
any lesson to be taught by the showing 
of the playlet in its present form, then 
it certainly escaped the intelligence of 
an entertainment loving public on Mon- 
day afternoon. S. L H. 



HAVILAND THORNTON CO. 

Theatre — Harlem Opera Bouse. 

Style— Playlet. 

Tone— Fifteen minutes. 

Setting — Special. 

This is a very timely playlet entitled 
"The Call to Arms." It deals with an 
old Irish couple whose son has been in 
the army and has been honorably dis- 
charged on the day that President wil- 
son proclaims we are at war with Ger- 
many. It hurts the pride of his militant 
father to think that he would accept bis 
discharge at such a time, and the action 
so transpires that the son decides to re- 
enlist and do his bit. 

The marching of a number of recruits 
past the house is a very well staged piece 
of business. 

The playlet is, on the whole, well 
acted, and the lines are bright. It should 
find appreciative audiences in these times. 

H. G. 



BILLY KILGARD 

Theatre — Harlem Opera Bouse. 

Style — Monologue and song. 

Timer— Eleven minutes. 

Setting — In one. 

After reciting a clever poem about 
himself, Billy Kilgard delivers a snort 
monologue, mostly about musicians, and 
has some rather entertaining talk. He 
then sits at the piano and ■< wiisiile* 
himself for a number of different styles 
of song, ranging all the way from an 
Italian dialect number to a ballad about 
turning to the right. 

Kilgard has considerable p ers o nali ty 
and offers ■ pleasing routine. H. G. 




BERLINE DUO 

Theatre— Delancey Street. 
Style — Singing. 
Time — Fifteen minutes. 
Setting— In one. 

Two comely girls make up the Berline 
Duo. 

They open with' a sort of introductory 
song, then one of them renders an oper- 
atic selection, while the other makes a 
change in costume. The latter ainga a 
spotlight song and is joined by her 
partner when the two render a Hawaiian 
number, one of the girls imitating a 
ukalele. 

The girls sing well bat the act is too 
draggy. With a slight change in their 
routine the turn could be speeded up to 
take a satisfactory place on any small 
time bill. S. W. 



KEENE AND WILLIAMS 

Theatre — Boulevard. 

Style— Rural sketch. 

Time — Fifteen minutes. 

Setting — Special drops. 

The name of the sketch Keene and 
Williams are offering is "Almost Mar- 
ried." 

On a bench before a special drop 
representing- a rural scene, aits a country 
girl, grotesquely dressed, paring carrots. 
She becomes tired and goes to sleep, the 
stage darkens and the scene changes. 

A city man cornea on and, meeting the 
country maid, makes love to her, finally 
inducing her to run home and change 
her dress and return to him in five 
minutes to be married. The stage dark- 
ens again and returns to the first scene, 
the girl awakens and finds it has all 
been a dream. 

The sketch is replete with laughs, the 
man being only a feeder for the comedy 
which the girl furnishes. S. W. 



AMOROS & JEANETTE 

Theatre — Harlem Opera House. 

Style — if an and ■ girl. 

Time— Eleven minutes. 

Setting— In one. 

The girl does most of the singing in 
this act, while the man, made up as a 
rather eccentric Fr enchm an, does con- 
siderable clowning and specialties- She 
has a pleasing appearance and sings 
sweetly. The brunt of the work falls 
upon the man, who does everything from 
comic falls to playing the concertina. 

The act is rather novel and, if the girl 
would put more pep into her part of the 
work, it would be greatly improved. 

H. G. 



HOMESTEAD QUARTETTE 

Theatre — Royal. 

Style— Octette. 

Time— Seventeen minute*. 

Setting— Special. 

In a rustic setting, eight men di cased 
in farmers' attire are discovered. They 
are billed as Denman Thompson's Famous 
Old Homestead Double Quartette. They 
possess very strong voices, and their 
routine of numbers varies between the 
old songs and the up-to-date popular 
melodies. 

The octette sings the old numbers beat. 
Their voices seem more suited to this 
style of song than to popular mrimlhm 

The act is a trifle long, considering that 
one number follows immediately upon an- 
other with nothing to vary the routine. 
The act could be cut down at li est five 
minutes to advantage. 

The Old Homesteaders should find fair 
on any bill. IT. G. 



HELEN TRIX AND SISTER 
Theatre — Proctor's, Yonkers. 
Style— Sister act. 
Time— Tteeaty-ftco minute: 
Setting — In one. 

After Helen Trix sings a solo about 
being a middy in the U. S. A. she 
renders another song at the piano in 
which ber sister joins behind a screen. 
Helen then exits and her sister does a 
Pierrette dance that smacks of the ama- 
teur. Another song by Helen follows 
and then comes a darky "blues" song 
with entirely too many verses. She 
whistles a number and does it well. A 
duet is next rendered, in which the slater 
shows a singing voice of considerable 
promise. The dance that follows the 
dnet will probably pass muster when it 
is properly rehearsed. 

A patriotic song follows, and another 
"blues" song is rendered for an encore. 

The act is entirely too long. 

Helen Trix seems rather careless in 
her make-up. On Thursday afternoon, 
her arms and neck were entirely 
neglected in this respect, with the result 
that the make-up on her face stood out 
too prominently. 

Her sister could develop into a charm- 
rag ingenue, under hard training. At 
present she shows too much amateurism, 
has a plain wardrobe and dances poorly. 
She needs to feel more at home upon the 
boards and to put more grace into ber 
dancing. Her voice is very suitable to 
ragtime numbers and "blues" songs. 

The act needs trimming and con- 
siderably more rehearsing and polish. 

H. G. 



LORRAINE & PRITCHARD 

Theatre — Proctor's, Tonkers. 
Style — Song and dance. 
Time — TvieVee minutes. 
Setting— FuU stage. 

Ted Lorraine and Frances Pritchard 
open with a waltz song from the "Blue 
Paradise," which is followed by a dance. 
Miss Pritchard follows this with a danc- 
ing single. 

Lorraine sings a number concerning 
Hawaii which is put over well enough, 
but would be better suited to hia voioe 
a tone or a tone and a half higher. 
The pair finish with a song and dance. 
The act is still in an embryonic state, 
but should prove an acceptable offering 
when the pair become more familiar, 
with their routine. H. G. 



"RICH GIRL, POOR GIRL" 

Theatre — City. 

Style — Comedy drama. 

Time — Twenty-live minutes. 

Setting — Special. 

"Rich Girl, Poor Girl" is a man's 
answer to "Which One Shall I Marry?" 
Unlike that act, it is not a preachment, 
but stands in great need of revision 
before being acceptable for the big time. 
In this it is a man who asks the ques- 
tion. He is pursued by two girls, one 
rich and the other poor, and we see 
him first as the husband of the rich 
one. He is constantly reminded by his 
wife of his former poverty, and tilings 
become so unbearable that a quarrel 
ensues, and a separation follows. 

Unlike "Which One Shall I Marry T 
he is not happy as the husband of a 
poor girl and in the prologue he decides 
to remain in single bl essedn e ss , while 
the girls who have a quarrel over him go 
off, saying sweet things to each other. 

"Rich Girl, Poor Girl" has not been 
treated in the same light ss the former 
act, the attempt at being fmmy sadly 
missing its mark. The result is neither 
a serious work nor a comedy. 8. W. 



HUFFORD & CHAIN 



Theatre— Royal 

Style — Songs and comedy. 

Time — Eighteen minute*. i 

Setting — In one. 

Nick Hufford and Dell Chain are a 
clever duo of whom more is going to be 
heard on tbe big time circuits. 

They start tbe act with a passable 
medley of popular songs, which they 
parody. 

This la followed by some "Jennie Dear" 
business, which has been done before, 
but this fact la excused by the business 
which follows. Chain, who has sung the 
song, suggests playing school, and asks if 
one of bis pupils will sing the chorus, 
whereupon Hufford skips down the aisle 
and sings from a place in the audience. 

Chain next ainga a number which Huf- 
ford threatens to accompany with hia 
violin, but each time he starts to play, 
hia partner tells him, "Not yet." When 
he finally is supposed to play, a string 
breaks. 

Hufford gives a splendid characterisa- 
tion of a country minister, which is a 
cross between Billy Sunday and OMc 
Sale's well known characterisation. It 
is sore fire. 

The act ends with a song number in 
which a good deal of hokum ia employed. 

The boys seem to be able to give the 
audience what those in front demand, 
and consequently the pair earn success. 

H. G. 



JOE REMINGTON & CO. 

Theatre — Greeley Square. 
Style— Comedy playlet. 
Time— Eighteen minutes. 
Setting— Full stage special. 

Joe Remington & Co. consists of a 
man and two women, who present a 
comedy sketch barely above the mediocre 
in quality. The material is poorly as- 
sembled, and tbe thread of the story so 
loosely carried that the audl&nco has a 
mighty hard time keeping track of the 
various situations in any attempt to 
learn what the plot of the story really Is. 

The character portrayed by the man 
is an acceptable one, bat those assumed 
by the two women are poorly done, as 
their enunciation and delivery of lines 
was very poor. 

The sketch hardly appears to be an 
acceptable one for neighborhood the- 
atres, despite the fact that there are a 
few humorous lines and situations in it, 
as they do not counterbalance the other 
deficiencies. A. U. 



W. J. REILLY, U. S. A. 

Theatre — Palace. 
Style — Pianologue. 
that— Fifteen minutes. 
Setting — In one. 

J. Francis Dooley stepped out to the 
footlights and introduced the chief-gun- 
ner's mate of the United States ship 
Texas, who, in a few well chosen words, 
outlined the fact that the work In the 
Navy, wMle hard at times, also had Its 
other good points, like movies and en- 
tertainment, and would next Introduce 
W. J. Rellly of the United States ship 
Michigan. 

Reilly ia a likable young chap, who 
has a good voice, and accompanies him- 
self nicely while seated at tbe piano, 
where be sings three songs, all of the 
comedy style. His finishing song is by a ■ 
long shot the best, and be does excel- 
lently with "My Own United States." 

Throughout the act be was liberally 
applauded, and several marines were 
noticeable about the theatre distribut- 
ing literature! in tbe lobby and seeking 
enHstmentsc. He scored the big hit of 
the bffl at the Palace this week. 

9. L. H. 



10 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



May 16, 1917 



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AFTER A SUCCESSFUL TOUR OF THE 

UNITED BOOKING OFFICE AND 

ORPHEUM CIRCUIT 

PAUL DURAND 

PRESENTS 









At B. F. Keith's Palace Theatre This Week, May 14 

EVAN-BURROWS 
FONTAINE 

Assisted by TOM RECTOR 

AND A COMPANY OF CLASSIC DANCERS 

IN AN ELABORATE ARRANGEMENT OF 

DECORATIVE HAWAIIAN, EGYPTIAN, 

GREEK and EAST INDIAN DANCE PANTOMIMES 



At B. f. Keith's Riverside Theatre, Next Week, May 21 



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May 16, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



10a 




THREE NEW BARRIE 
PLAYS PRESENTED 

AT THE EMPIRE 



-AW HVBNING WITH J. M. BAB- 
SIB." — Three new play* presented by 
Charles Frehman, the proBta of which 
are to go to the Stage Women's War 
Belief. Produced Monday evening. 
May 14. at the Empire. 
OAST. 
"The Saw Word." 

Mr. Torraaee Norman Trevor 

Mrs. Torrance Winifred Fraser 

Soger Gareth Hughes 

Lacy Betty Datntry 

"Old Frianda." 

Stepbea Brand Lyn Harding 

The Bev. Dr. Carroll H. Ashton Tonge 

Mrs, Brand. ........... .Oertrude Berkeley 

Carry Eileen Kuban 

"The Old Lady Shows Har Medals." 

Private Dowry. Jahn M. UcFarlane 

Mr. Wllkinaoa, a clergyman. 

Edward Broadley 

Mr*. Dowey Beryl Mercer 

The Chew.. Clara T. Bracey, Alice Eaden. 
Lillian Brennard 



Three new James M. Barrie plays fur- 
nished three hours of pure and unalloyed 
enjoyment at the Empire Theatre on Mon- 
day night. Each playlet is a gem, two in 
particular, "The New Word" and "The 
Old Lady Shows Her Medals," ranking 
with the best and most appealing pieces 
of dramatic writing Mr. Barrie has ever 
done. 

"The New Word" was "second lieuten- 
ant" — a word almost forgotten 1b Englsnd 
until the war brought home its meaning. 
Norman Trevor did excellent work in the 
part of the undemonstrative British father, 
whose nineteen-year-old son, Roger, is 
about to depart for the front. The boy 
for the first time dons his uniform and 
comes downstairs to have a final chat with 
his father. As they are left alone the 
awkward relationship which has existed 
between father and son melts away. 

There are many thrills in "Old Friends," 
a study in heredity in which the sins of 
the father are brought out with startling 
realistic effect, Stephen Brand, played by 
Lyn Harding, a successful English business 
man, hag in his younger days been a drunk- 
ard. He is proud of the fact that he has 
conquered his weakness, which he believes 
has left no mark upon him. He confesses 
to his pastor, however, that of late he is 
haunted by shadows that are gathering 
about him and he is terror stricken for fear 
they will speak to him. 

They do speak, but in a manner most 
horrifying, when he discovers his young 
daughter creeping downstairs in the middle 
of the night and unlocking the cabinet 
where the spirits are kept. For she ia a 
drunkard and the father's sing have passed 
on to her. Eileen Huban was the daughter 
and Gertrude Berkeley played the mother. 

"The Old Lady Shows Her Medals." is 
a pathetic story of the war, delightful in 
its lighter moments and tear compelling in 
its serious ones. 

Mrs. Dowey (delightfully played by 
Beryl Mercer) is a Scotch charwoman, 
alone in London, miserable because the war 
which means so much to everyone is almost 
nothing to her. All' her neighbors have 
sons or relatives at the front each "doing 
his bit" 

So she invents a son, a member of the 
famous Black Watch who, she reads in the 
papers, bears the same name as herself. 
Under a fictitious name she sends him little 
gifts and in order to deceive her neighbors 
addresses letters to herself which she 
proudly displays. By a strange turn of 
fate the son arrives in London on a fur- 
lough and finds the old woman. At first 
he denounces her, but her appeal to be 
allowed to have some part in the great 
struggle wins him and he at parting ac- 
cepts ber as his mother. 

Touching indeed is the finale, the poor 
woman just as she has found a son, loses 
him, and the curtain falls as she tenderly 
puts away the keepsakes of her boy whose 
life Is sacrificed at the front. 



LONDON TO HEAR DE KOVEN 

The Messrs. Shuberts are planning to 
present a repertoire season of Reginald de 
Eoven comic operas in London next Fall. 
Those to be presented include "The High- 
wayman," "Robin Hood" and "Maid 
Marion." The company will be made np 
largely of singers nad actors now appear- 
ing in "The Highwayman" at the 44th 
Street Theatre, including John Charles 
Thomas, Bianca Saroya, Jefferson de 
Angelis, Letty Yorke, Sam Ash, Stanley 
Forde and Lawrence Cameron. 



BRADY GETS "EYE'S DAUGHTER" 

William A. Brady will shortly place in 
rehearsal, "Eve's Daughter," a new play 
by Alicia Ramsey. It will have its initial 
presentation in the Belasco Theatre, Wash- 
ington, on June 4, and will be brought into 
New York in the. Fall. 



IBSEN'S "GHOSTS" 
IS REVIVED AT 
COMEDY THEATRE 



"OHOSTS." — William Archer's English 
adaptation of Beurie thaen'a drama, 
revived Monday sight. May 7. at the 
Comedy Theatre by the Washington 
Square Players. 

CAST 

Begins Bngstrand Margaret Mower 

Jacob Engitracd T. W. Gibson 

Paator Macdera Arthur E. Hobl 

Mr*. Alving Mary Shaw 

Oswald Alving Jose Bnben 



The Washington Square Players on Mon- 
day night revived "Ghosts" with Mary 
Shaw in the leading role. It is the most 
ambitious offering this little company has 
essayed since its foundation several years 
ago and is given as a climax to what has 
been the best season from all viewpoints 
of this organization. 

This Ibsen play seems to have a stronger 
hold upon the fancy of the public than 
any other work of this author and for that 
reason it is more often presented. His 
tragic treatise of heredity seems to fas- 
cinate many of our public who go to see the 
work time and again and never tire of 
feeling the creeping sensation. The grue- 
some atmosphere and bold lines are re- 
sponsible for no matter how often the play 
is viewed. 

Mary Shaw did good work as Mrs. Alv- 
ing. She seemed temperamentally fitted 
to this Ibsen heroine. 

Jose Ruben gave an excellent perform- 
ance of Oswald and T. W. Gibson was 
good as Jacob Engstrand. The others were 
not equal to the tasks assigned them. 



NO CHANGE IN "LITTLE WIDOWS" 

Contrary to reports, that Harry Fox had 
been engaged to succeed Carter de Haven 
in "His Little Widows" at the Aster 
Theatre, Anderson and Weber announce 
that no changes have been made in the 
cast of that musical comedy except in the 
case of a dancing act, Rowley and Young, 
who retired from the company Saturday 
night in order to fill vaudeville engage- 
ments previously contracted. 



N. Y. TO SEE "MOLLY" NEXT FALL 

"The Melting of Molly" will not be 
brought to New York this season. It has 
been seen in several out-of-town cities, but 
Lee Shubert and Frederic McKay, its man- 
agers, have decided to wait until next 
Fall before giving it a metropolitan show- 

ing. 

"UNCLE ROBERT" PRESENTED 

New Haven, Conn., May 12. — The first 
presentation of "Uncle Robert" was given 
here this week with James Lackaye as 
star. Melville Raymond made the produc- 
tion. 

SET OPENING DATE 

"Dollars and Sense" will be given by 
Alan Brooks at the Belasco Theatre, Wash- 
ington, D. C, on May 21. 



"WALUNGFORD" IS 
HEARTILY WELCOMED 
BACK TO BROADWAY 



••GET-BICH-QTJICK WATJJNGFORD." 
— Comedy hy George M. Cohan from 
George Randolph Chester's atortes, re- 
vived by Bale Hamilton and Edward 
Ellin, Monday night. May 7, at Cohan 
Theatre. 

CAST. 

Edward lamb Harold Vermllye 

Willie Harold Graa 

"Andy" Dempsey Carrl Anderson 

Fannie Jasper Myrtle Tanneblll 

O, W, Battles John O'Hara 

Clint Harklna Purnell Pratt 

Abe Ganther Eugene Keith 

Bessie Meers Grace Goodall 

Jane Eugenia Fvrsxnan 

Gertrude Dempsey. Paula Sterling 

Mrs. "Andy" Dempsej Charles Wlllard 

Richard Welles Frederick Burton 

Dorothy Welles Betty Wales 

Horace Daw Edward Ellis 

Charlie Joseph Jenks 

Yoel Henry Matsumoto 

J. Burns WaUlngtord Hale Hamilton 

Judge Kenneth B. Lampton. 

Qeorge K. Heoery 
Timothy Battles, the Mayor. . Horace James 

Henry Qolgg H. J. Nixon 

E. B. Lott Benson Lamar 

Tom Donahue Frank Mayae 



■ "Get-Rich-Quick Walliugford" came back 
with a bang at its revival last Monday 
night. The Cohanesque touches were just 
as noticeable, the human nature, the funny 
finance, all seemed just as pleasing as they 
were when this play took New York by 
storm in September, 1910. In the six and 
half years intervening it has found success 
in England and Australia and now it comes 
back to us with none of the bloom off its 
cheek, and from its present reception it 
appears to be doomed to retain its bloom 
of youth for many a day to come. 

To Messrs. Hamilton and Ellis New 
Yorkers owe their opportunity to laugh at 
Wallingford once more. They appeared in 
the original production and their faith in it 
has never died out. As J. Rufus Walling- 
ford and Horace Daw, respectively, they 
are just as funny as ever. Hamilton is 
just as unctuous in his humor and Ellis is 
just as suave. 

Others who return to the play are Grace 
Goodall, Purnell Pratt and Horace James, 
all of whom do their former good work. 

Myrtle Tannehill, Eugene Keith, Fred- 
erick Burton and Harold Vermllye are 
among the new comers who contribute to 
the success of the revival. 



COHAN & HARRIS HAVE NEW ONE 

Cohan & Harris win produce "He and 
She," a new play by Rachel Crothers, on 
June 25, at Atlantic City. The cast will 
comprise Maclyn Arbuckle, Erne Shan- 
non, Beatrice Prentice and Norman 
Trevor. 



THEATRE GIVING AWAY SUGAR 

Logan-sport. Ind., May 12. — Manager 
Harlow Byerly, of the Colonial, is giving 
away boxes of sugar at all matinee per- 
formances. The plan is proving a big 
drawing card for the Colonial. 



FOUR "BRATS" NEXT SEASON 

Oliver Morosco has announced his in- 
tention of presenting four companies of 
"The Brat" next season. Arrangements 
for a production in London and Australia 
have already been completed. 



ACCEPT "LOVE AND LEARN" 

The next production of Winchell Smith 
and John Golden will be "Love and 
Learn," by Salisbury Field. It will be 
put into rehearsal in time for an early 
Fall presentation. 



TO REVIVE "SHENANDOAH" 

Bronson Howard's "Shenandoah" will 
he revived in Los Angeles .shortly by 
W. H. Crane, with Tyrone Power heading 
the cast 



"KITTY BF.I.l.AJRS" SET TO MUSIC 

"Kitty Darlin," the new light opera for 
which P. G. Wodehouse and Guy Bsltoa 
are writing the libretto and Rudolph 
Friml the music, is a musical version of 
"Sweet Kitty Bellalrs." in which David 
Belasco starred Henrietta Crossman. In 
the new version Alice Nielson haa been en- 
gaged to sing the prima donna role, and 
Edwin Stevens will be seen in the role be 
created. 



ELMENDORF OPENS AT ELTLNGE 

Dwight Elmendorf began a week's en- 
gagement Sunday night at the Eltioge 
Theatre, offering his travel lectures under 
the direction of A. H. Woods. He may 
continue them at some other Broadway 
theatre. The subject of Sunday night's lec- 
ture was "Around the World," illustrated 
with still and moving pictures photo- 
graphed by himself in all parts of the 
globe. 



"EYES OF YOUTH" PRESENTED 

Stamford, Conn.. May 14. — "The Eyes 
of Youth." a comedy by Charles Gueron, 
received its first presentation on any stag* 
Saturday night at the Stamford Theatre. 
In the cast are Fay Wallace, Harry 
Davenport, Leonard Ide, Robert Coness, 
Clifford Stork and Warner Richmond. The 
Shuberts will present the play in New 
York after a brief tour. 



"MARY'S ANKLE" CAST COMPLETE 

The cast of "Mary's Ankle," May Tully*e 
farce comedy, which A. H. Woods wHl 
produce May 28 at the Shubert Theatre, 
New Haven, includes Irene Fenwick, Wal- 
ter Jones, Zelda Sears, Louise Drew, Bert 
Lytell, Leo Donnelly, Harry Lillford, Ida 
Darling and T. W. Gibson. 



TO GIVE IBSEN'S "WILD DUCK" 

Ibsen's "The Wild Duck" will receive 
its first production in English in this city 
at a matinee benefit soon to be given for 
the Red Cross. The work will be staged 
by Rudolf Christians, and Josephine Victor 
will play the role of Hedvlg. 



ARUSS CLOSING SATURDAY 

This Is the closing week of George 
Arliss' engagement in bis revival of "Dis- 
raeli" at the Knickerbocker Theatre, 
Souvenir booklets of the play will be given 
away at the matinees to-day and Saturday. 



TO PRODUCE AMERICAN OPERA 

"Azora," an American grand opera by 
Henry Hadley, will be produced by the 
Chicago Opera Co., when that company 
comes here for its season at the Lexing- 
ton Opera House next January. 

WHITNEY PLAY BEING REVISED 

Rida Johnson Young ia revising the 
book of "When Johnny Comes Marching 
Home," which P. C. Whitney is reviving 
at the New Amsterdam Theatre, in order to 
bring it more up to date. 

CHANGE NAME OF SHIPMAN PLAY 
The title of Samnel SMpman's play, 
which is to be produced by A. H. Woods 
before the summer comes, has been changed 
from "Suspicion" to "The Target" 



DRAMATISTS HELP FUND FAIR 

The Society of American Dramatists last 
week forwarded to Daniel Frohman a 
check for $250 as its contribution to the 
Actors' Fund Fair. 



"PETER IBBETSON" EXTENDED 

The engagement of "Peter Ibbetson" at 
the Republic Theatre, originally booked for 
eight weeks, has been extended Indefinitely. 

"BOSOM FRIENDS" TO CLOSE 
"Bosom Friends" will close its engage- 
ment at the Liberty Theatre next Saturday 
night. 



10b 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



May 16, 1917 



EARL LINDSAY 

and 

PHYSIOC & STORY 

ROOM 810, 1482 BROADWAY, NEW YORK 
Have immediate engagements for competent principals and chorus girls for Productions, Vaudeville 

Revues and Pictures. 



FRED 



LULU 



HOLMES SWELLS 

^=— WILL MEET ALL COMERS ^=— 

"ON THE DOOR-STtEP" 

OF THEIR SUIVflVIER HOME AT FLORAL PARK, L. I. 
Communications — Care of MORRIS and FEIL 



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nniinuiiritiiauuiminsmiiraniiiBOTaaiinntminiriiiriirifiinLiiiciinirmriirnnTiiiHnaaMmiBnmmiaiiHmniiDiBananBn 



■inwiiiiinu—e 



KATE MULLIIVI PRESENTS 

The SIX ROYAL HUSSAR GIRLS 

In a Melange of Instrumental and 'Vocal IVlusIe 



™T'''™' lll "™'iiiiniiiiri'iiHi'i*T"n"r"i"Ti**'*imr , "" , "™™* m "" 



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TOIVIIVIY HAYDN 



3 Versatile English Comedian 

Meeting with great: suoooas evory-vtrhot-o \J. B. O. Direction PAT CASEY 



A NEW PATRIOTIC SONG, A THRILLING WAR SONG, A THRILLING WAR SONG 

"THE SWEETHEART OF THE U..S. A. 



»E HATED TO I'. O. S. OF A 



Professional Copies to Recognized Singers 



W. HENRY PEASE PUBLISHING CO., MOUNT VERNON,. N. Y. 



WANTED 



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Work for first class vaudeville act. 
Must be good looking or make up 
stunning. Must be of good build 
and not less than 5 feet 6 inches in 
height. Apply Orpheum Theatre 
(Stage Door), Brooklyn, all this 
week. 

SPENSER KELLY 



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Can handle a limited number of 
high class attractions 



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WANTFIl Vounp woman to play &mall line of 
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17; Canaan, Conn.. May 18; Mill Btrer. Masv., May 
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May 16, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



11 




Founded In MS by Frank Qiiwo 

Published by the 

CLIPPER CORPORATION 

Orland W. Vaugban... President and Secretary 

Frederick C. Muller Treasurer 

1604 Broadway, New York 

Telephone Bryant 6117-6118 

ORLAND W. VAUCHAN, EDITOR 

Paul C. Swetnhart, Managing Editor 

NEW YORK, MAY 16, 1917 

Entered June 24, 1879, at the Post Office at 
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Profession Is Patriotic 

It is gratifying to note the willingness 
of members of the amusement profession 
to do their "bit" in connection with the 
war. On every hand we learn of men and 
women of tbe theatre showing their 
patriotism in various ways, and included 
is every one from manager to property 
man. 

Long before tbe war was brought to 
our doors, there were numbers of Ameri- 
can actors with the Allies in France, either 
in the aviation corps, in the trenches, or 
doing ambulance work, while in the list of 
Red Cross and hospital workers it was 
not uncommon to see the name of some 
well known American actress prominently 
mentioned. 

Of course, such persons were actuated 
from the standpoint of humanity, as our 
flag was not threatened, but it went to 
show that tbe right spirit was there and 
sacrifice meant nothing to them when 
humanity called. 

But the number who answered that call 
was small indeed as compared to the num- 
ber who have responded to the call of Old 
Glory. Managers are lending their the- 
atres for recruiting purposes. Tbe picture 
men have made slides urging those who 
hold back to come forward and do their 
duty. Women of the dramatic vaudeville 
and burlesque stage have volunteered to 
aid recruiting officers in their work, and 
only last week in a Middle West city, a 
vaudeville actress, on her own initiative, 
visited factories in that place, called mass 
meetings and said she would personally 
answer every letter that came to her from 
the trenches bearing the post mark of 
France. 

Many dramatic, vaudeville, motion pic- 
ture and bnrlesqne actors have signed up, 
some for the officers training camp at 
Plattsburg. some for the ranks and some 
for the Naval Reserves. 

Workers in more than one motion pic- 
ture concern have gone in a body to 
Uncle Sam's agents to show their willing- 
ness to fight for their flag, and the heads 
of these concerns have shown their patriot- 
ism by telling the men that they would 
be welcomed back when they return. 

We have reason to be proud of mem- 
bers of the amusement profession. For 
their charity they have ever been known 
and now. when their country needs them 
they show the same willingness to fight 
for their flag as they always have to give 
for charity. 



Answers to Queries 

M. W. — "Candida" was first produced in 
America by Arnold Daly. 

• SI • 

A. S. C. — John Mason was a member of 
the Boston Museum Stock. 

• • » 

P. M. C. — Otia Skinner played the lead- 
ing role in "Kismet." A wins. 

• * * 

R. N. O. — The Casino was built many 
years before the Knickerbocker. 

• • • 

N. B. S. — Frank Whitman, the dancing 
violinist, is now appearing in England. 

• • «• 

N. B. I. — It was May Robson, not 
Eleanor, who was under the Sire manage- 
ment. 

• * a 

G. B. I. — The late Charles Klein wrote 
"The Third Degree" and also "The Lion 
and the Mouse." 

• * * 

S. O. A., Brooklyn. — Emma Carus was 
a popular burlesquer before she went into 
musical comedy. 

• • • 

R. S., New York. — Dan Daly, not Pete 
Dailey, appeared with Edna May in "The 
Belle of New York" in London, Eng. 

• • • 

A. N. — Daniel, Gustav and the late 
Charles Frohman were brothers. Each 
began his theatrical career as an agent. 

• « * 

D. O. — A is right. George Arliss and 
Wm. B. Mack were members of Mrs. 
Fiske's stock company at the Manhattan 
Theatre. 

• • * 

J. F. — "The Great Metropolis" was tbe 
first prodnction made by the firm of Klaw 
& Erlanger and for those days it was in- 
deed a massive production. 

• « • 

B. H. R.— -You are wrong. "Shenan- 
doah" was presented at Proctor's Twenty- 
third Street Theatre, and "The Girl I 
Left Behind Me" at the Empire. 

• * • 

V. B.. Erie. — The Ringling Brothers 
Circns appeared in Madison Square Garden 
once. That same Spring the Barnum & 
Bailey Circus appeared in Chicago. 

• • * 

0. F. R.— The Brockton (Mass.) Fair 
has for many years been considered the 
most imnortant and biggest fair in the 
East, and, is not surpassed on tbe American 
continent. 

• • • 

A. C. G. — Kitty Blancbard was wife of 
the late McKee Rankin. One of their 
dnutthters. now dead, was the wife of 
Sydney Drew. The other is the wife of 
Harry Davenport. 

• • • 

1. A. T.. Baltimore.— B. F. Keith was 
recognized as the founder of continuous 
vaudeville, but F. F. Proctor gave New 
York its first performance of this kind at 
his Twenty-third Street Theatre. 

• * • 

E. E. E. — Oscar TTammerstein built the 
Olympia on Broadway from Forty-fourth 
to Forty-fifth Street which included what 
is now called the New York Theatre and 
the Criterion. The former was called the 
Music Hall and the latter the Theatre and 
one admission entitled a patron to both 
houses. 



TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO 

William Jerome sailed for Europe. 

Bernard Dyllyn was with the "Corinne" 
company. 

The Lambs' Club moved from 27th Street 
to 29th Street. 

John J. Sweeney, of Sweeney and 
Ryland. died. 

"A Fool's Paradise" was produced by 
E. S. Willard. 

Charles Kenna was with the Four Em- 
perors of Music. 

Frank ("Bud") Williamson was a part- 
ner of Dave Montgomery, playing the 
variety halls. 

Jndge Morrow won the Brooklyn Handi- 
cap. beatiDg Pessara, Rnssell, Raeeland, 
Clarendon, Banquet, Madstone, Longstreet 
and other cracks. 



DISLIKES SUPPER SHOWS 

Editor, New York Cupper: 

Dear Sir: — I would appreciate your 
giving me the opportunity of entering a 
complaint through your columns concern- 
ing the manner in which "supper shows" 
are run at the New York vaudeville 
houses. 

The other evening, having several hours 
to kill around the supper hour, I decided 
to go 'to a vaudeville show, and I bought 
a ticket for the Proctor Theatre on East 
One Hundred and Twenty-fifth street. 

Although I was charged the same price 
as is charged for their other shows, I Jo 
not feel that I received the same value 
in return. Understand, I am not com- 
plaining particularly of this theatre but 
am merely taking it as an instance of all 
houses whore supper shows are played. 

I am not a picture fan, and yet I was 
forced at this show to sec reel after reel 
of movies, although the theatre is primar- 
ily a vaudeville house, and vaudeville is 
what 1 had conic to see. Moreover, 
throughout the running of the pictures, 
the complete orchestra of the theatre was 
there and played for all it was worth. 

Finally, the vaudeville started, wnere- 
upon the orchestra filed out. In other 
words, the pictures seemed important 
enough to retain the orchestra, but the 
vaudeville acts were only secondary! 

With a poor piano accompaniment, the 
singing and dancing acts rushed through 
their routine. No encores were taken, 
and every performer's idea seemed to be 
to get it over and done with. 

Either the admission price for tbe sup- 
per show should be lowered or the patrons 
should be given a regular, well run vaude- 
ville bill. 

Yours truly, 

ALFRED WlIXABO, JB. 

New York City. 

SEEKS LOST WIFE 

Editor, New York Clipper : 

Dear Sir: — A reward is offered for any 
information regarding the whereabouts of 
Carrie Reynolds Lewis, my wife. 

The management of the Washburn 
Carnival states that Mrs. Lewis left that 
organization April 10, ostensibly for her 
home at Olean, N. Y. ; but she never ar- 
rived there, and her parents and son are 
equally in ignorance of her whereabouts. 
She had considerable money and a dia- 
mond ring when leaving the show, and 
also a deed in her favor to my home and 
other property. 

Mrs. Lewis is of medium height, brown 
hair and eyes, dark complexion, aquiline 
nose, weight about 155 Mjb.; is forty years 
of age, but appears much younger; very 
highly educated, and of agreeable disposi- 
tion. She is well and favorably known 
in the profession, having during the twen- 
ty years of her married life traveled 
with Welsh Bros., Puwnee Bill, Walter L. 
Main, Norris and Rowe, Francis Ferari, 
Washburn's and other tented attractions. 
Respectfully, 
Cam. Stanley Huntley Lewis, 

Special Publicity Manager. 
"The Crisis." 
Cincinnati, Ohio, May 14. 



RIALT0 RATTLES 



WANTS MORE PICKFORDS 
Editor, New York Clipper: 

Dear Sir: What has become of Mary 
Pickford? Or, rather, why do we not see 
more pictures in which this dainty picture 
star appears? 

Is it because that, since she became in- 
terested in her own motion picture com- 
pany, acting before a screen has become 
too much like work, or is it because she is 
unable to get screen stories suitable to her 
talents t 

I am a great admirer of Mary Pickford, 
and in my opinion she has no equal in 
motion pictures, but when one Bees so few 
pictures in which she appears there seems 
a likelihood of her losing much of her 
well-deserved popularity. 

A year or so ago, if my memory serves 
me, I used to see one and sometimes two 
Mary Pickford feature pictures a month. 
Now I rarely see one. Indeed, it has been 
so long since I saw one that I have almost 
forgotten it. 

Again I ask, "What has become of Mary 
Pickford?" 



THINGS YOU'LL NEVER SEE 
A] Darling with a grouch. 
Another "Patria" in the Keith houses. 
Irene Bordoni doing German comedy. 
A vaudeville bill without a patriotic 

song. 

Eva Tanguay in drama- 
Jane Cowl singing "I Don't Care." 



SUGGESTED BY TITLES. 

"Bosom Friends" — William Collier and 
Geo. M. Cohan. 

"The Man Who Came Back"'— Arnold 
Daly. 

"Pals First'* — Joe Weber and Lew 
Fields. 

"A Successful Calamity" — Evelvn Nes- 
bit. 



THERE'S A REASON 

On Broadway, around Forty-seventh 
Street, the sidewalk slopes noticeably 
downward from the building line to the 
curb. Muriel Ostrich, who is a tiny little 
mite, usually walks close to the building 
Hue, especially when escorted by a tall 
young gentleman. We wonder why! 



WHEN JOFFRE CAME TO TOWN. 

First Performer: "See how they've deco- 
rated the avenue for Marshal ." 

Second Performer: "I never thought 
they'd give him such a wonderful wel- 
come home reception, even though Mar- 
shall Montgomery is mighty popular!" 

STARTLING HEADLINES 

Lamb's Club Opens Publicity Bureau. 

"I'm Through with the Rats."— Mount- 
ford. 

Belasco Loses Suit. 

New Patriotic Song Written. 

CONTRADICTIONS. 

Victor Herbert is a conductor, but ha 
never rings up jitneys. Al Woods is a 
producer, but he doesn't grow any vege- 
tables. We know a lot of hams, but they 
cau never lie cured. 



NAME TELLS THE STORY 

Melville A. Buscr is suing Bessie Busrr 
for divorce, giving intoxication as the 
cause. If his charges are sustained, and 
he wished to be facetious, he might call 
her Bessie Boozer. 



THAT'S WHY HE WROTE IT 

Gordon Dooley has written some touch- 
ing verse entitled. "The Wife." Perhaps 
you think he is in the hen-pecked class. 
Well, guess again, for he isn't even 
married. 



COINING MONEY 

We haven't seen Fred Schwartz around 
Broadway lately. Perhaps lie finds po- 
tato growing at Bayside more profitable 
than talking with his theatrical friends. 



IS MARY HURT? 

A contemporary's headline reads 
"Mary's Ankle Cast." We know that 
they have casts for legs, but we're not so 
sure about ankles. 



ONLY ONE THING NEEDED. 

Charles F. Clark, of the Ringling Cir- 
cus, has written a playlet. The only 
thing lacking now is a producer. 



AWAKENED SPRING TO SLEEP. 

The German sex play, "The Awakening 
of Spring," was banned from the Ameri- 
can stage. Too much Kultur. 

A COUSIN TO WICKY WACKY 

The name of Raymond Hitchcock's naw 
play, "Hitchy Koo," probably means some- 
thing similar to wacky woo. 



MORBID COMEDY. 

"Ghosts" is rather a serious subject for 
a comedy theatre. 



A SUGGESTED REVIVAL. 

"The Music Master" with James K. 
Hackett. 



12 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



May 16, 1917 



LONDON 



PARIS 



FOMEI€M M 




BERLIN 



LONDON AT A GLANCE 



London, Eng., Hay 5. 
Zaleski has joined the colon. 

Joe Elvin is on the L. T. V. Tour. 



Hetty King ia still on the Mow Tour. 

The Two Tom Boys are on the Moss 
Tonr. 



Fred Maple ia playing the provincial 
halls. 



Syd Sydney is booked for the Gulliver 
Tonr. 



Musical Lento returns to town on Whit 
Monday. 



George Edwards will be in Yarmouth 
next week. 



Roy Royston, of the Palace forces, has 
joined the colors. 

The Brothers May were this week at the 
Empire, York. 

The Two Kortinis play the Palace, High 
Shields, next week. 



Sam Barton plays the Empire, New 
Gross, week after next 



Fits and Gerald play the Hippodrome, 

Gloucester, next week. 



Harper and Harper were at the Palace, 
Northampton, this week. 

The Q's will be at the Hippodrome, 
Southampton, next week. 



T. FJder-Hearn has been gazetted Flight 
Commander in the R. F. G. 



The five Hollanders open at the Vic- 
toria. Folkestone, next Monday. 



Mary Ijiw has signed a long contract to 
sing records for the Gramophone. 



Edith Cairn's Five Gold Flakes were at 
the Coliseum, Belfast, this week. 



The Three Saxbys will be at the Winter 
Gardens, Bournemouth, next week. 



Once-nightly shows are run at the Em- 
pire, Motherwell, except on Saturdays. 

Fred Brandon, of the Brandons, is re- 
covering from a recent serious illness. 



James Reid this week played a return 
date at the Pier Pavilion, Southampton. 



Betancourt played the Grand, Clapham, 
this week. He is on the Gulliver Circuit. 



Beatie and Babs are doing well in 
their new comedy scene, "Kitchen Frolics." 

Billy Fry has been forced to retire from 
the cast of the revue, "L* Petit Cabaret." 



The Caron Troupe are in Scotland. 
Tbey played the Empire, Glasgow, this 
week. 



Mary Glynn and Dennis Neilaon -Terry, 
of "The Aristocrat" cast, were recently 
married. 

A. E. Griffiths, formerly manager for 
Louis Hart, is fighting "somewhere in 
France." 



John E. Jordan, of the Copelands, at- 
tached to the R. G. A., has been made a 
bombardier. 



sketch written by herself entitled "Hatty's 
New Hat" 

Colin Vance has been discharged from 
the army and has resumed his music hall 
engagements. ____ 

Little Elsie Prince is doing well on the 
Mobs Tour. She has refused several offers 
for pantomime. 



Harry Ray in his success, "Find the 
Lady," plays the Hippodrome, Barrow, 
week after next. 



Les Bastiens, the Belgian comedy acro- 
batic fiends, are touring the provinces with 
their novelty act 

W. A. J. Croke, manager of the Theatre 
Royal, Nottingham, has been through the 
Bankruptcy Court. 

The De Breans present their comedy 
juggling silhouettes at the Empire, Wood 
Green, next week. 



Frank Lennox, stage manager at the 
Palace, Bath, has been granted one 
month's exemption. 

The Hackett Quintette, at the Louvre, 
Parkhead, this week, play the Seamore, 
Glasgow, next week. 



Albert Gilmer has suffered a severe 
nervous breakdown and has been ordered 
to take a long rest. 

Tubley Edlin recently married Lois 
Williams at Bedford Park. Frederick Mel- 
ville was best man. 



Coleman and Alexandra are back at the 
Folies Bergere, Paris, where they are filling 
a five weeks' booking. 



Jack Eden has dissolved partnership 
with the Eden Sisters and Howard, and 
is doing his single act. 

The Great Adler, who is filling return 
dates in Sweden, will not return to Eng- 
land before September. 

May Mayo retires from the "Hold 
Tight" revue, of which she has been man- 
ager and leading woman. 



Florrie Gall i more will sing her own song, 
"Rose, Rose, Rose," at the Hippodrome, 
Birmingham, next week. 



Herman Darewski is giving away 10,000 
song copies at the Prince's Theatre Sun- 
day Night Soldier Shows. 



Syd Walker has been ordered by his 
physician to take a rest and undergo a 
system of medical treatment. 



The Three Dancing Madcaps have been 
joined by their younger sister," Zella, who 
is an expert buck and toe dancer. 



The third round of the War Loan 
Snooker Handicap was finished last 
Wednesday on schedule time. 

Phyllis Barclay, principal vocalist with 
the Eight Harmony Girls, has returned to 
the act after a short absence. 



Ellis Drake will soon appear in a 



Lee White did not miss a single per- 
formance during the entire nine months 
run of "Some" at the Vaudeville. 

Miss Olga and the Diving Norins have 
gone to their homes in Sweden for a 
rest. They will return in July. 

Arthur R. Lewis, late of the Minerva 
Tronpe, is now in Sherbrooke Hospital, 
Stapley House, Nantwich, Cheshire. 



The Hackett Quintette close tonight at 
the Electric Theatre, Falkirk, and open 
next week at the Louvre, Parkhead. 

Herman Darewski is at work on several 
songs for a new vaudeville revue which 
will be given by a company of twelve. 

Michele Gerbola, late of the Gerbola 
Troupe of Italian arcrobats, is now fight- 
ing in the first lines of the Carnia front 



"The Side of Mr. Bacon," which George 
Graves is to present at the London 
Coliseum on May 28, is a food problem 

play. 



Shirley Kellogg and Daphne Pollard 
are back in the "Zig-Zag" cast at the Hip- 
podrome, after a short absence due to 
illness. 



Jim Pearson, for twelve years musical 
director at the Empire, Bradford, now 
holds a similar position at the Palace, 
Halifax. 



Lennox Barry, the well known music 
hall manager, has been selected for a com- 
mission, after serving thirteen months in 
the ranks. 



At the conclusion of her engagement at 
the Coliseum Adeline Genee auctioned her 
dancing shoes for the benefit of War 
charities. 



Roelgin's Parrots have another week in 
their South African tour, unless their 
continued success causes an extension of 
their time. 



Eugene Stratton's visits to London are 
very infrequent these days. He seems to 
have settled down for good at Ills home 
in Cbristchurch. 



"The Only Peace" is the title of a play 
which Clifton Alderson is presenting in 
the provinces. He expects to bring it to 
London shortly. 



Recent bookings by the I. V. T. A. Ltd. 
for South Africa are: Marie Bray man, 
Espinosa, Clarice and Edythe Howard, 
Eva Kelland and the Lannons. 



We are to have another adaptation of 
that once popular French farce "La Cag- 
notte." It will be given an early pro- 
duction in a West End theatre. 

Fred Fulton, author and producer of 
Florrie Forde's "Midnight Revels," has 
joined the Army. Jimmie Armstrong is 
now touring manager with the show. 



Herman Taylor, for several years con- 
nected with the business forces of the Hip- 
prodome, Rochdale, has been appointed 
manager of the Hippodrome, Alrrincham. 



Frank Pawcett and Austin Fryers will 
present "A Sister to Assist *Er" at the 
Victoria Palace, May 21. This is one of 
the late Fred Emney's popular sketches. 



London, managers are up in arms over 
the fact that restaurants making concerts 
a regular feature of their week's bill are 
exempted from the war amusement tax. 



Because he billed himself on a music 
hall tour as "Driver Frank Gleson, the 
Anzac tenor," Gleson was recently fined 
£5 for unlawfully using the word "Anzac." 



Jack Keating, acting manager of the 
Argyle Theatre, Birkenhead, recently 
proved his versatility when he filled for 
one of Harry Tate's company in "Motor- 
ing," which was presented for the wound- 
ed soldiers. 



SYDNEY 



MAID STEALS OTERO'S DRESSES 

Pabis, Ft., May 10.— La Belle Otero, 
the Spanish dancer, has had a maid ar- 
rested on the charge of stealing clothing. 
After the dancer began missing some of 
her more expensive costumes the police 
searched the maid's home and found the 
stolen garments. The maid admitted the 
thefts and asserted that the dresses were 
so filmy that she put them in her pocket 
like handkerchiefs. 



TO PRODUCE TATE REVUE 

London, Eng., May 11. — Albert de Cour- 
ville has decided to produce his new revue, 
"Goodby-ee," by Harry Tate, at the Olym- 
pia, Liverpool, before he gives it in Lon- 
don. It is founded on Tate's "Motoring." 
In the cast will be Mr. Tate, Dorothy 
Ward, Phyllis Bedells and Tom Stuart 



NDCISCH CANCELS TOUR 

Copenhagen, Denmark, May 12. 

Arthur Nikisch, conductor of the Berlin 

Philharmonic Orchestra, has cancelled his 
intended concert tour of Norway because of 
the hostile feeling aroused in that country. 



BUYS AMERICAN RIGHTS 

London, Eng., May 10. — The American 
rights to "Hush," which Atho Stuart is due 
to present at the Court Theatre next Sat- 
urday nigbt, are likely to be disposed of 
before the play is produced, as negdtia- 
tions to that end are in progress. 



JOHNSON TO BOX IN RIO 

Rio de Janeiko, Brazil, May 11. — Harry 
Clark has arranged for twenty-one ex- 
hibitions to be given by Jack Johnson, who 
will sail from Barcelona, Spain, on the 
steamship Balmea, arriving in time to 
open here June 1. 

KLEIN AND GILBERT VOLUNTEER 

London, Eng., May 12. — PhiUp Klein and 
Gilbert II. Miller have presented them- 
selves at the American Consulate here, 
ready to join the first American expedi- 
tionary force reaching this side. 

MISS ROCKWELL SAILS FOR HOME 
Sydney/, Aub., May 14. — Florence Rock- 
well has ended her engagement under the 
direction of the J. O. Williamson, Ltd., and 
sails tomorrow from Wellington, New 
Zealand, for San Francisco. 



AMERICA TO SEE "THE MAID" 

London, Eng., May 10. — Negotiations 
are on to take "The Maid of the Moun- 
tains" to America. It is the biggest 
musical hit Daly's Theatre has had since 
"The Merry Widow." 

JACK NELSON RETURNS 

London, Eng., May 11.— Jack Wilson 
and Nellie Waring have returned from 
South Africa, being on the water for thirty- 
four days, double the length of time usually 
taken for the trip. 



CELEBRATE "AMERICA DAY" 

London, Eng., May 12. — The musical 
comedy shows now running celebrated 
"America Dsy" by introducing one or more 
musical numbers purely American in spirit 
and composition. 



EMPIRE SKIPS DIVIDEND • 
London, Eng., May 10.— The holding 
company of the Empire has acquired the 
freehold of the house and increased its 
capital to £225,000. No dividend will be 
paid for 1916. 



"CHU CHIN CHOW" MAKES RECORD 

London, Eng., May 11. — By passing its 
300th performance, "Chu Chin Chow" has 
established a record in the history of His 
Majesty's Theatre, where it is running. 

DICKENS' SISTER-IN-LAW DEAD 
London, Eng., May 10. — Miss Georglna 
Hogarth, sister-in-law of Charles Dickens 
and for twenty-seven years his housekeeper, 
is desd at the age of ninety years. 



May 16, 1917 



THE NEW YORK. CLIPPER 



13 




POU CO. OPENING 

IN SPRINGFIELD 

MAY 21 

TO PLAY THROUGHOUT SUMMER 

Springfield, Mass., May 14. — Poll's 
Palace Theatre will open its summer stock 
season next Monday with a company which 
recently closed in New Haven. The house 
has been playing vaudeville. 

The organization had played in New 
Haven during the Winter and has closed to 
make way for the musical company which 
opened there at the Hyperion Theatre. It 
is beaded by Charles Carver and Jane Mor- 
gan. Carver is not new to Springfield, 
having appeared here before with Poll stock 
companies. 

Others in the company include Jessie 
Brink, character woman; Harry Andrews, 
stage director; Frank Thomas and John 
Dilson, all of whom have been seen here 
in previous seasons, and Stanley JameB, 
comedian; Vessie Farrcll. second leads; 
Belle Cairns, ingenue ; Carl Jackson, Will- 
iam Gregory. J'-, and Jerry Broderick, 
stage manager. 

"The Silent Witness" has been chosen 
as the opening attraction, and many of the 
plays selected for production are succcesses 
of recent seasons, including "It Pays to Ad- 
vertise," "The House of Glass," "Common 
Clay," "Hit-the-Trail-Holllday," and "The 
Heart of Wetona." 

The Poll Players will remain in Spring- 
field throughout the entire summer. 

NORTHAMPTON CO. TO CONTINUE 

Northampton, Mass., May 14.— The 
trustees of the Academy of Music have 
unanimously decided to continue the mu- 
nicipal stock company, known as the 
Northampton Players, next season, action 
being taken in response to a favorable 
vote of the patrons. The trustees plan to 
engage a manager who will live in North- 
ampton and devote his entire time to the 
interests of the theatre. 

SALT LAKE CITY CO. CLOSING 

Salt Lake City, May 12. — This is the 
final week for the Wilkes Players at the 
Wilkes Theatre, the company closing to- 
night in "The Poor Little Rich Girl." 
Ruth Ormsby was especially engaged by 
the management to appear in the title 
role. The same company will return to 
Salt Lake City and reopen at the Wilkes 
Theatre September 2. 

SPOKANE CO. ENDS ENGAGEMENT 

Spokan. Wash., May 12.— To-night's 
performance will be the last for the 
American Players at the American The- 
atre, "The » Sweetest Girl in Dixie" being 
the closing attraction. Ruth Gates and 
Ralph Cloninger are the leading players. 
The play was produced under the personal 
direction of Victor Gillard. 

ELLSWORTH MANAGING HOUSE 

Paterson, N. J., May 14. — Frederick 
Ellsworth has succeeded J. Fred Miller as 
resident manager of the St. Claire Play- 
house, where the Winifred St. Claire Stock 
Co., with Nola Mercer and Robert Gleck- 
ler in the leading roles, is appearing. 



HORNE TO HAVE SUMMER CO. 
Akron, O., May 12.— Col. P. F. Home, 
whose stock company is playing at the 
Music Hall will put ont another company 
for the summer to play at the Idora Park 
Casino, Youngstown, O., opening June 11. 

MORGAN JOINS HORNE CO. 

Akron, O., May 12. — Owen Morgan baa 
joined the Home Stock Co., at the Music 
Hall, as leading man. 



AMERICAN REVUE OPENING 

Pgabodt, Mass., May 12.— The American 
Musical Revue, featuring' Hal Ring Jr., 

will open its Summer season early in Jnne 
for a tour of the New England States. 
Among the people engaged at present are 
Amy Shorten, Clara Ann Hope, Richard 
Towne, Bob Brewster, Pauline Geary 
White, Allen V. Reeves, the Sothern Sis- 
ters, Melle LVArmond, Billie Wbee:«r and 
Charles riiefert, as musical director. 

Several of Mr. Ring's playlets are to be 
featured. Among them "The Naked Lie," 
"The Man Hunt," "Romance O" The Moun- 
tains." The dancing novelties include "The 
Apache," "Snowflakes." "The Spirit of 
Liberty." The musical tabs include "The 
Silly Season," "The Girl Between," "Gay 
Widow Fay" and another big feature will 
be "Shadow Film Players" in pantomine 
sketches. The well known girl act The 
Bine Ribbon Maids will have the chorus 
end to look after. Hal Ring Jr. is direct- 
ing the entire production and special 
scenery, new wardrobe, and special musical 
numbers will be used. 



VEES OPENS CO. IN WHEELING 

Whekunq, W. Va., May 14. — Albert 
Vees opened his stock company at the Vic- 
toria Theatre last Monday, ' presenting 
"Where the River Shannon Flows." The 
roster of the company includes Albert Vees, 
Hal. Mordaunt, Sam C. Miller, Jack Ball, 
Frank Hawkins, Percy Kilbride, James 
Johnston, Florence Lewin, Evan Sergent, 
Margaret Ryan and Marie Harcourt. Some 
of the plays to be presented during the 
Summer season are "When We Were 
Twenty-One?" "The Rainbow," "Mother," 
"The Country Boy," "Rolling Stones" and 
"Charley's Aunt." 



RUTH ROBINSON WINS PRAISE 
Philadelphia, May 12. — Ruth Robin- 
son, the young leading woman of the Knick- 
erbocker Players at the Knickerbocker 
Theatre, scored a tremendous success last 
week in "The Girl of the Golden West." 
The critics were unanimous in their praise 
of her work and this character was con- 
sidered her biggest achievement since open- 
ing. 



STOCK PLAYERS MARRY 

Reno, Nev., May 11. — Walter' Gardner 
Kniffen and Flossie Gustin, both with the 
Theodore Lorch Stock Co., were married 
last Saturday at the bride's home here. 
Miss Gustin was formerly Mrs. George 
Cann, bnt resumed her maiden name 
through the permission granted in a de- 
cree of absolute divorce. 



MUSICAL CO. IN HUTCHINSON 

Hutchinson, Kan., May 12 — The cast 
of the Stanley Edwards Musical Stock 
Company, playing at the Rex Theatre, in- 
cludes H. S. Brummell, Mansfield Ardis, 
Jack Lawrence, Bert Cushman, Frances 
French, Frances Davee, Geneva De Von, 
Josie Swem, Terry Winters, and Nora 
Bundy. 



COLORED CO. NOW AT LINCOLN 

A. C. Wynn, who has been operating the 
colored stock company at the Lafayette 
Theatre, now has a company at the Lincoln 
Theatre four blocks away. The players are 
all new and are offering this week "New 
Tear's Eve, In Chinatown." 



BLAIN TO OPEN WITH "7 KEYS" 

Saskatoon, Can., May 12. — "Seven Keys 
to Baldpate" will be the opening bill of 
the James Blain Players, who open a Sum- 
mer stock engagement at the Empire Thea- 
tre here May 24. Mr. Blain is now in 
Chicago assembling his company. 



DORENTES AT SUMMER HOME 

WrtDwooD, N. J., May 12. — Mr. and 
Mrs. Norbert E. Dorente, having closed 
their season with the Ernie Marks Co., 
touring Canada, are now at their Summer 
home at Wildwood-By-the-Sea. 



DRAMATIC CO. IN 

MINNEAPOLIS 

OPENING 

REPLACES MUSICAL ORGANIZATION 



Minneapolis, Minn., May 12. — The 
Bainbridge Players, a dramatic stock or- 
ganization, is scheduled to open to-mor- 
row at the Shnbert Theatre, under the 
management of Samuel Goldberg, formerly 
treasurer of the house. 

The Shnbert has, until recently, been 
housing a light opera and musical comedy 
company, the Bainbridge Light Opera 
Players, who brought their engagement to 
a sadden dose. 

The dramatic players will remain for 
six weeks, during which time they will 
offer a series of late dramatic and comedy 
successes. 

"Hit-the-Trail Holliday" will be the 
opening attraction, to be followed by 
"Potash and Perlmutter*' and "It Pays to 
Advertise." 

In the cast of the new organization will 
be Averill Harris, who will portray the 
leading roles ; Joe Holicky, recently with 
the "Cheating Cheaters" company ; Ken- 
neth Bradshaw and Marie Gale, ingenue, 
both of the old company. 

Joe Holicky will be stage director and 
all plays will be produced under his per- 
sonal supervision. 



UNION HILL GETS NEW PLAY 

Union Hill, N. J„ May 15. — The Keith 
Hudson Players, at the Hudson Theatre, 
will present, for the first time on any stage 
during the week of May 28, a new play by 
Roy Foster, entitled, "After Office Hours." 
The piece will be produced under the joint 
direction of Arthur C. Alston and William 
Wood. 



WILLIAMS CO. IN QUINCY 

QUINCT, 111., May 12.— The Ed. Williams 
Stock Co. has opened its third season here, 
"Wildfire" being the initial attraction. 
Tiny Leone is Mr. Williams' leading 
woman. The company at Elkhart, in its 
twenty-second week, has been left in charge 
of Griff Barnett. 



WARDA HOWARD IN BRIDCF.PORT 

Bridgeport, Conn., May 14. — Warda 
Howard joins the Lyric Players to-night at 
the Lyric Theatre as the new leading lady, 
succeeding Adelaide Keim, who goes to 
Portland, Me., to play leading roles with 
the Keith Players. 

BONSTELLE CO. IN DETROIT 

Detroit, May 14. — The Jessie Bonstelle 
Stock Co. opened its engagement here to- 
night at the Garrick Theatre, and will re- 
main until July 16, when it is due to open 
at the Star Theatre, Buffalo, N. Y. for the 
Summer season. 



GLASER CO. OPENS 

PrrrBBUBOH, May 15. — The Vaughan 
Glaser Stock Co. opened its season at the 
Alvin Theatre last night, presenting 
"Romance." Fay Courtney and Vaughan 
Glaser play the leading roles. 



BREINIG JOINS WILLIAMS CO. 

Tebre Haute, Ind., May 12. — P. J. 
Breinig, musical director of the Grand The- 
atre, joins the Ed Williams Stock Co. at 
Quincy, 111., Monday. The company is 
playing an indefinite engagement there. 



CECIL KERN JOINS DENHAM CO. 

Denver, May 12. — Cecil Kern has given 
np her dressmaking establishment in New 
York to play leading roles in the new stock 
company which opened recently at the Den- 
ham Theatre. 



MELVILLE'S IN OLD TERRITORY 

Redlands, Cal., May 11. — Melville's 
Comedians are in their sixth consecutive 
season and are now heading for their regu- 
lar territory. The company is featuring the 
De Armond Sisters, Lillian and Irene, Jack 
Vinson and Bert Melville. 

The roster is as follows: Bert Melville, 
manager and owner; Paul Maxwell, busi- 
ness manager ; C. A. Bell, advance repre- 
sentative; Sadie De Armond, treasurer; 
Prof. Max De Arvilie, band director; 
Prof. Frank Vlllim, orchestra, leader; 
Chaa. Young, superintendent, with a crew 
of eight men ; Clarence Alexander, props., 
The De Armond Sisters, Dorothy Prim- 
rose, Mrs. R. Padgettc, Baby Dorothy 
Vinson, Mrs. Vinson, Mrs. Bert Melville, 
Ed Gruzard. "Happy" Jack Vinson, R. 
Padgette, Hal Brown, Osa Crabel, Norman 
V. Grey, Vern Douglas, Joe Kuhner. 
Robert Grinsbaw, George McDonald, Jim 
Hart. Shorty Oscar. Bernie Tihba and the 
Musical De Arvilie. 



"FIREFLY" TO OPEN LYRIC CO. 

Providence, R. I., May 14. — The Lyric 
Musical Comedy Co., under the direction 
of Nat Ryster, will open its summer en- 
gagement at the Lyric Theatre next Mon- 
day in "The Firefly." It wbb originally 
intended to use "Sweethearts" as the 
opening attraction, but, on account of the 
engagement of Florence Webber and Frank 
Moulan it was beleived that the "Fire- 
fly" would be a much stronger offering 
for the premiere of the company. Miss 
Webber is to appear in the original 
TrentJni role. 

Besides Moulan and Miss Webber, there 
will be in the cast Carl Gaotvoort, 
Francis J. Boyle, May Francis, Jack 
Squires, Georgia Harvey, Charles Prevln, 
Chester St Clair and a chorus of forty. 



CRAIG CO. RETURNS TO BOSTON 

Boston, May 14. — The Craig Players, 
after an absence of a year, have returned, 
opening last Monday at the Castle Square 
Theatre in "Mrs. Wiggs of the Cabbage 
Patch." In the company are Mabel Col- 
cord, Florence Martin, Augusta Gill, Dor- 
othy Dickinson, Beatrix Barrlngton, Eliza- 
beth Hunt, Sylvia Cushman, Henrietta 
Dickinson, Mae Reynolds, Donald Meek, 
Frederic Ormondo, George Le Soir, Gra- 
ham Velsey, Robert Caproo, William 
Foote, Frederick Murray, George L. Patch, 
Viola Cecil and William George. 



LIEB CO. TO OPEN JUNE 4 
Chicago, May 14. — Scenery has arrived 
at the Wilson Avenue Theatre, for use in 
stock, the coming season when that house 
under management of Herman Lieb, 
changes its policy, June 4. The opening 
bill will be "Seven Keys To Bald-pate." 
The theatre-staff will remain intact, with 
Mr. Licalzi, its present incumbent, in 
charge. Top price of admission will be 
fifty cents. 



CRAIG TO GIVE NEW PLAY 

Boston, May 14.— "Kitty, Kitty, 
Kitty," a new farce by William M. Blatt, 
will receive its first performance on any 
stage by the Craig Players at the Castle 
Square Theatre this week, as their second 
week's offering. The piece will be under 
the personal direction of John Craig. 



THOMAS JOINS ALBANY STOCK 
Albany, May 14. — Frank M. Thomas, 
with the Com stock Players here three 
seasons ago, has joined the Bleecher 
Players for the season and will make his 
first appearance in the leading part in "It 
Pays to Advertise" this week. 



PLAYERS LEAVE CO. FOR FILMS 

Albany. May 14. — John Warner .and 
Helen Joy have resigned from the Bleecfitr 
Players stock to fill motion picture con- 
tracts. Both are expected to do very well" 
in the film business. 



14 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



May 16, 1917 




BUILD UNDERSEA 

GARDENS FOR 

NEWJTORK 

KEMBLE BACKING $780,000 PLAN 



A new amusement undertaking, calling 
for an expenditure of three-quarters of a 
million dollars, and to be known as the 
Undersea Gardens, will be launched at the 
Grand Central Palace shortly under the 
management of William H. Kemble, the 
man who first introduced two dollar 
movies into Brooklyn. 

Mr. Kemble. who has been associated 
with many large amusement enterprises, 
announces that the most famous theatrical 
producers are to co-operate with him in 
providing an entertainment that will 
eclipse anything heretofore seen in this 
city. It is the intention of the manage- 
ment to make the Undersea Gardens a 
New York Summer institution that will 
attract visitors from all parts of the 
country, as well as New Yorkers. 

The interior of Grand Central Palace 
is to be transformed to resemble the depths 
of the ocean, and there is to be a huge 
tank in the centre of the lower floor in 
which there will be diving exhibitions and 
all forms of aquatic sports. The floor 
space of the building is larger than that 
of any other amusement building in the 
United States, and accommodations will 
be provided for 30.000 visitors a day. 

A show will be staged which will con- 
tain many novelties and a mammoth 
musical review will be put on. requiring a 
cast of the most noted stars, and hundreds 
of chorus girls. 

While the Undersea Gardens will be an 
elaborate amusement enterprise, it is to 
be conducted largely in the interests of 
the War Relief Funds of America and 
her allies. A number of concessions of 
all kinds, including an exposition of war 
exhibits from all the allied countries, will 
occupy the second floor, and there will 
be booths at which nrtieles made by 
wounded soldiers oif France and Kngland 
win be sold. The proceeds of these 
objects will be devoted to the funds being 
raised here for those countries. 

A restaurant, larger than any at present 
in New York, will also be one of the at- 
tractions, and there will he tea gardens 
and dancing floors, a huge ice skating 
rink, rifle ranges for men and women, and 
numberless other features. 

Work on the Undersea Garden has been 
in progress for several weeks, and it is 
planned to throw open the new amusement 
place some time in .Tune. 



PIER CHANGES OWNERSHIP 
Atlahtic Crrr. N. J.. May 12. — Ocean 
Pier has been taken over by the Ocean 
Pier Amusement Co.. of which Costee Dilo- 
poulo. head of the Nader Greater Shows, 
is president. Chas. Zokzook. who has had 
concessions at a number of expositions is 
manager, and Charles Kerler. Jr.. a circus 
press agent, is secretary. 



JOHNNY NALON'S FATHER DIES 

Sergeant M. C. Nalon. in charge of the 
Bowery gate of Steeplechase Park, Coney 
Tsland. N. Y- for the last nine years, died 
May R at his home in Brooklyn. The de- 
ceased was an U. S. Army veteran, having 
seen fifty years of service. He was the 
father of Johnny Nalon. 



WEATHER AGAINST CIRCUSES 

Chicago. May 14. — The cold weather of 
the past few weeks is proving very un- 
profitable for circuses, many of the shows 
finding it hard to even break even. The 
Nat Keiss Shows. Yankee Robinson Shows 
and Coop and Sent Circus are all com- 
plaining. 



RAVINIA PARK OPENS JUNE 30 

Chicago, May 14. — Ravinia Park, on 
the Milwaukee Electric line, win open 
with its usual program of concerts and 
operas, Saturday sight, June 30. The 
Chicago Symphony orchestra will give con- 
certs in the afternoons. Friday nights 
win be devoted to Wagner. Repertoire 
opera win be shown the other six nights 
of each week. Ballet divertissements will 
be an added feature of the opera on nights 
when the time permits. Louis Eckstein, 
who has been president of the park as- 
sociation since 1911, announces that ex- 
tensive alterations have been made in the 
big pavilion. 

Gennaro Papi. of the Metropolitan opera 
boose, and Richard Hageman, win con- 
duct the orchestra. Edith Mason, Flor- 
ence Macbeth and Marguerite Beriza will 
top the roster of lady singers. Morgan 
Kingston returns for bis third season, 
OrvUle Harrold for bis second. Rosina 
GaUi wiU again head the ballet, with 
Giuseppe BonfigUo in support. 



PROVENCHER TO MANAGE PARKS 

Boston, May 14. — E. A. Provencher has 
been appointed by the Bay State Street 
Railway Co. for the parks operated by 
them. The parks to be nnder bis man- 
agement are The Pines. Haverhill. Long 
Reach. Gloucester: Lake view Park, 
LoweU: Glen Forest. Lawrence: West- 
wood Park, Boston : Highland Park. 
Brockton : Sabbatia Park. Taunton : 
Dighton Rock Park. Fall River: Long 
Beach. Newport, R. L, and Lakeside Park, 
New Bedford. 

Among the attractions at the various 
parks wffl include musical comedies, light 
operas, dramatic stock, vaudeville, free at- 
tractions, motion pictures, fireworks and 
aerial ascensions. 



GARDENS BLOCK CARNIVALS 

Hammond, Ind., May 12. — Because 
Northern Indiana and Southern Illinois 
residents have responded heartily to the 
appeal for garden development in order to 
stave off food shortage, traveling carnivals 
are finding it difficult to locate in this sec- 
tion. In previous years it was an easy 
matter for nomad troupes to secure space. 
But now nearly every available spot is 
being developed. At Goshen, two circus 
agents, nnable to find space in . which to 
pitch tents, were forced to forego their 
intention to offer their show in the 
vicinity. 



PHILA. PARKS SOON TO OPEN 

Phtlaoelphia. May 14. — Philadelphia 
«>'mmer parks are awaiting the beginning 
of warm weather to throw open their 
gates. Willow Grove Park has undergone 
its usual spring overhauling and will open 
for the season next Sunday. Woodside 
Park and Point Breeze Park are already 
prepared for the opening of the season. 



CARNIVAL WAITER BURNED 

: Conneixsvtlle. Pa.. May 12. — Gnstine 
Maanasis. I waiter in the cook tent of the 
Rutherford Shows, was severely burned 
when his clothing caught fire recently as 
a quantity of gasoline ignited in the cook 
• tent. Maanasis is in the hospital suffer- 
ing from painful burns on the chest, back 
and arms. 



CINCINNATI RESORT OPENS 

Cincinnati. May 14. — Chester Park 
opened its season Saturday. The vaude- 
ville theatre in still a main attraction. 
Col. Ike Martin. Manrice Wolfson and 
Jack Martin continue at the pilot wheel of 
the resort. 



CWCINNATI CONEY HAS FIRE 

ONcnrK.vn, May 14. — The Coney Is- 
land power house was destroyed by fire 
with a loss of $15,000. The scheduled 
opening of the resort wfU not be changed, 
the management says. 



LUNA OPENING 

WITH MANY 

CHANGES 

PAWNEE BILL SHOW FEATURED 



Carpenters and laborers are working 
overtime at Luna Park, Coney Island, so 
that the famous amusement resort, which 
is being remodeled, can be entirely ready 
for the season's crowds when it throws 
open its gates this Saturday. 

A complete readjustment of the ground 
plan was necessitated on account of a 
new elevated railroad line which is being 
built along Surf avenue and which cuts 
off a considerable portion of the front of 
the old park. As a consequence, the front 
of Luna has been moved back a consider- 
able distance. More depth has been added 
in the back, however, so that the park 
is as large as heretofore. In making this 
change, it was decided to place the games, 
which have always been in front of the 
Park, in the rear, and the rides have 
been moved to the front. 

There is also a new entrance to Luna 
on Twelfth street, which is to be exclu- 
sively for automobiles, and an enclosure 
for an automobile parking station has 
been built. 

The big feature this season will be 
"Pawnee Bill's Pioneer Days," which is a 
cowboy and Indian spectacle. This fea- 
ture contains the foUowing personnel: 
Major Gordon W. LOlie (Pawnee B01) ; 
Cowboys and Western Frontiermen: 
Leonard . Stroud, Fred Burns, Ernest 
Wffletts, Col. Harry B. Hicks, Ike Pap- 
pan, OrviUe Huffman. A. E. Harvey, and 
James B. Subbett; Lady Riders: Princess 
Winona, Lillian Knight, Dixie Devere, 
BiUie Mack, Keota Gunter, Mamie Stroud 
and Mary Young^ Deer; Cossacks: Jimmie 
Cossack and his five Cossack Riders; 
Mexicans: Jose Barraro, Blais Herman - 
dez, Don Jauquez and two Mexican riders; 
Indians: Chief Bald Eagle with twenty 
Sioux Indians; Comedian: Joe H. Lee. 

According to the announcements of the 
management everything at Luna will be 
new, with the exception of the old stand- 
ard rides and the "Darktown Follies," 
which has been retained owing to their 
big success last season. The FoUies, 
which played last year in the open, win 
be housed in a new indoor theatre this 
year. 

As heretofore, there will be free danc- 
ing in the ballroom, and a complete free 
bUl of acts wiU be presented twice daily. 

Bavetta's Concert Band has been en- 
gaged for the season. Gertrude Van 
Deinse will be featured as the soloist. 

Among the new attractions will be 
"The Top," which is a new, sensational 
ride, measuring about one hundred and 
fifty feet in diameter and swinging into 
the air seventy-five feet or more. 

Other new concessions will be: "A Trip 
to Melodia." "The China Mystery,*' "A 
Worm's Eye View," "A Submarine At- 
tack," and "Onandaga Indian Dance." 

The rumor that Coney Island would be 
dark at night this season is unfounded, 
and Luna will remain open every evening, 
closing at 1 a. m. 

Oscar C. Jurney retains the general 
managership of Luna, and Frank T. Buell 
is in charge of the publicity department. 



STEEPLECHASE PARK OPENING 

Everything is in readiness for the open- 
ing Saturday of George C. Tflyou's Steeple- 
chase Park. The indoor free theatre will 
continue as a feature attraction. Five new 
laugh-making devices have been added. 
Several extra clowns have been engaged. 
A real Jazz ba nd, which proved a sensa- 
tion during the Winter in California, has 
been contracted to furnish the music. 



OSHIER IN CHARGE OF CAR 

LOGAN-SPOKT. Ind., May 14. — Car No. 1 
of the Gentry Bros, is in charge of Jack 
Oshier, former brigade agent of the Bar- 
Diim & Bailey shows. The rest of the 
crew is as follows: Boss billposter, Dan 
BaUey ; biUposters, Vera Rictor, George 
Griffith, Charles Brooks and Mode Grimes : 
lithograph boss, Fred Carpenter; Uthos, Al. 
Jenkins, Sam Stein and E. Clevenger. Mr. 
Furleman is programer. Buck Massey, 
contractor, is also with the car. Mrs. 
Oshier is spending this week on the car, 
the guest of her husband. 



MEMPHIS PARK INCORPORATES 

'Memphis, Tenn., May 12.— The Lake- 
view Boat Club has filed an application 
with the Shelby County Register to operate 
an amusement park at Lakeview, near that 
city. It is planned to conduct an amuse- 
ment park in addition to dealing in boats, 
airplanes, hydro-airplanes and airplane 
equipment The capital stock of the cor- 
poration is $10,000 and the incorporators 
are A. L. Heiskell. C. W. Thompson, V. E. 
ScheveneU, B. E. Moses and W. T. 
McLain. 



LAUTHER DIES IN BALTIMORE 

Baltimore, May 14. — J. C. Lauther, 
for several years with Brown's Inter- 
national Shows, and this season with his 
son, Carl, who has the 10-in-l show with 
the Washburn Mighty Midway Shows, died 
recently in a hospital here, after a brief 
illness. The body was shipped to Cin- 
cinnati and interred in Spring Grove Cem- 
etery there. 



BOURME, HIGH DIVER, INJURED 
Jersey Cttt, N. J., May 12. — Harry 
Bourme. high diver with the Levitt- Taxier 
Shows, met with an accident while per- 
forming in Paterson recently, as the re- 
sult of a miscalculation in his dive. He is 
in a hospital there suffering from a con- 
tusion of the spine. 



ROE WITH JOS. FERARI SHOW 

Bbxdgeton. N. J.. May 12. — Willett L 
Roe has joined the Joseph G. Ferari 
Shows as promoter and press agent, having 
recently closed with the Metropolitan 
Shows, with which he was working since 
the beginning of the season. Mr. Loudette 
succeeds him. 



BOARDWALK FOR CONEY ISLAND 

Atbant, May 14. — A bill was passed in 
the Senate last week authorizing the com- 
missioner of the land office to transfer to 
the City of New York land under water 
along the waterfront at Coney Island for 
the purpose of constructing a boardwalk. 



DALY SIGNS WITH WESTERMAN 
New Britain. Conn., May 12.— Ed. 
Daly, who just closed ahead of Jacobs 
and Jermon's Golden Crook Co., has taken 
the same position ahead of George West- 
erman's "World of Pleasure" carnival 
shows. 



CANADIAN TOWN BOOKS CLYDE 

Saskatoon. Canada, May 12. — Clyde's 
World at Home Shows will supply the mid- 
way attractions for the Saskatoon Indus- 
trial Exhibition here from Jnly. 31 to Aug. 

3. 

RAINS POSTPONE CARNIVAL 

Tekbe Haute. Ind., May 12. — The Gib- 
son Carnival Company, which were to have 
exhibited here last week, were unable to 
open on account of heavy rains. 



NEW MGR. FOR MICH. PARK 

Detboit, May 12. — Arthur R. WUber. 
formerly manager of the Lagoon, Cincin- 
nati, is the new manager for Lake Orion 
and has opened offices here. 



JACKSON WITH GENTRY SHOW 

Eddie Jackson has closed as twenty-four 
hour man with the John Robinson Ten Big 
Shows and has joined the Gentry Bros.' 
Shows as press agent. 



May 16, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



is 



WESTERN OFFICE, 

Room 210 

35 SO. DEARBORN ST. 




FOR ADVERTISING 
RATES 

Phone Randolph 5423 



SEEK ALLEGED 

FILM THEATRE 

DYNAMITERS 

CASES AROUSE GREAT INTEREST 



Rigorous prosecution of labor leaders in 
uu effort to fix the responsibility for city- 
wide dynamiting of moving picture theatres 
is now under way in Chicago. Eighty-five 
proprietors and managers of movie theatres 
and one hundred other witnesses have given 
testimony to Assistant State's Attorney 
Nicholas Michaels tending to show that 
the theatre owners have paid over half a 
million dollars to extortionists within the 
last .five years. 

Eleven men, including Raymond Cleary, 
mainstay of local 157, James Gorman, Jack 
Miller, Fred Mather, member of fixture 
hangers' union, Thomas Walsh, Frank 
Hayes. Peter Cunniff, Henry Gussenberg, 
Paddy King, Win. Pinsted and an alleged 
dynamiter named Galvin, have been men- 
tioned as knowing something about the 
persons responsible for the outrages, by 
State's Attorney Hoyne. 

Albert Fuchs, proprietor of the Chateau 
Theatre. Broadway and Grace Streets, it is 
alleged, paid $30,000 when extortionists de- 
manded the money upon threatening to de- 
stroy the theatre in event of refusal. Fuchs 
refused to accede to a later demand for an 
additional $3,000 and made a statement to 
the State's Attorney. Soon afterward the 
theatre was damaged by a bomb explosion 
which would have destroyed it entirely had 
a mistake not been made in the placing of 
the explosive. 

The Bandbox Theatre, in Madison Street, 
and the Castle, on State Street, are said 
to have paid $1,000 and $1,500 respectively, 
to escape the consequences of employing 
operators belonging to any union other than 
local No. 157. Twenty-seven others "came 
across" in compliance with demands made 
by locals No. 157. No. 110 and No. 134, it 
is reported. 

Within recent weeks dynamite outrages 
committed against moving picture theatres 
have been almost a nightly occurrence. 



STOPS "SPIRIT OF '76" 

Second Deputy Funkbouser has re- 
fused to permit a continuance of the 
showing of "The Spirit of '76" picture 
which was presented at Orchestra. Hall. 
Major Fiinkhouser acted under advice of 
Assistant Corporation Counsel Chester E. 
Cleveland, who said the picture had an 
anti-British tendency, and under Presi- 
dent Wilson's proclamation it was the 
duty of Funkhouser to refuse permits to 
any photoplay which would tend to pro- 
mote ill feeling among the people of the 
United States against any of her present 
allies. 



SIX AUTOMATS COMING 

Sometime ago. The Cupper's Chicago 
page contained an item intimating that 
performers used to the "Automat" lnnch 
idea as purveyed in New York and Phila- 
delphia would soon find a similar institu- 
tion in Chicago. The details were com- 
pleted last week, when Horn & Hardart 
leased property for the purpose. They 
plan establishing six Automats here. 



COHAN'S IN DEMAND 

Cohan's Grand Opera House building is 
in great demand as a headquarters for 
music publishers' branch offices, since the 
publishers were forced to move from the 
Randolph building. 



MAY CLOSE SARATOGA 

A well-defined movement is on foot to 
bring about the revocation of the Saratoga 
hotel license, as a result of recent dis- 
closures involving young girls. The place 
used to bear a good reputation as a the- 
atrical hotel, but, within recent years, has 
become slack. Judge John Stelk, of the 
Court of Domestic Relations, who con- 
victed three men Saturday for luring girls 
to the hotel, expressed indignation that the 
institution is permitted to operate without 
police interference. Assistant State's At- 
torney Hogan has advised the State's Attor- 
ney's office to file an injunction restraining 
the further operation of the hotel. 



CABARETS FEAR PROHIBITION 

Chicago cabaret owners are momentarily 
anticipating war-time prohibition legislation 
which will deprive them of a big source of 
revenue. Though the 200 saloons which 
have already closed in anticipation of 
stringent orders comprise the lower strata 
of saloons, few of them bavin? cabarets, 
many of the more influential owners feel 
that it is only a question of time ere they 
will be forced to take like action. 



HERK GONE TO NEW YORK 

I. IT. Herk, manager of the Haymarket 
stock burlesque, went to New York last 
week to attend a wheel conference. He 
intends to motor from there to Toledo, 
his home town. 



THEATRE GUM VENDERS FIGHT 

Because Mrs. Rebecca Risnokis, sixty- 
seven years old, felt that she had a prior 
right to selling gum in front of the Hay- 
market Theatre lobby, she entered into a 
fist fight with Mrs. Martha Albert, seventy 
years old, when the latter tried to. vend gum 
in the same locality. 



SISTERS LEASE OWL THEATRE 

Mabel- Griffin and her sisters, colored 
musical comedy stars, have taken over the 
Owl Theatre, Fifty-seventh and State 
Streets. They will present their own 
revues and personally-booked vaudeville 
acts. 



MEYERS ENGAGES ENTERTAINERS 

Included in Eddie Myers' entertainers at 
Frieberg's Hall are his own "jazz" band, 
Madge Reefer, formerly of the North 
American. Estelle Ward, who used to be 
at Rector's, New York, and Marie La Mar. 



GLATT LEADS THE BAND 

Barney Glatt. who used to act as Harry 
Riding's secretary at Cohan's Grand, is 
now fiddling and leading the cabaret or- 
chestra at Monahan's, Sixty-seventh Street 
and Stoney Island Avenue. 



WAR TAKES EXCURSION BOATS 

Chicago's theatrical colony will find few 
excursion boats to take the members to 
Wisconsin and Michigan resorts this Sum- 
mer, as war-time requirements have requisi- 
tioned most of the craft. 



MARION & RANDALL IN "GALLOP" 

Mile. Marion and Martinez Randall are 
doing what they term "The Highland Gal- 
lop" at Green Mill Gardens. She is the 
"steed in harness," while he "holds the 
reins." 



OPERATE ON DOROTHY SOUTH 

Dorothy South, featured at the Winter 
Garden, underwent an operation for appen- 
dicitis, last Sunday, at the Lakeside Hos- 
pital. 



FRANK CLARK 

MYSTERIOUSLY 

SLUGGED 



CARTOONISTS SISTER ENTERTAINS 

Rose Alberti. sister of Hershfield, the 
Hearst papers' cartoonist who created 
"Abie the Agent," is singing at Herman's 
cafe. 



LILLIAN ROCKLEY IN CABARET 

Lillian Rockley, the Australian singing 
comedienne, has closed a long-term contract 
with the Woodlawn. as a cabaret artist. 



IS SUING FOR DIVORCE 



Much mystery surrounds the beating up 
of Frank Clark, Western manager for 
Waterson, Berlin & Snyder, who is now in 
the hospital as a result of injuries he re- 
ceived, which almost killed him. 

Clark expresses the belief that the at- 
tack was in some way linked with his 
divorce action against Flo Jacobson. 

The slugging occurred last week, when 
Clark, visiting the Windsor Theatre, in the 
company of Morton Harris, a staff song 
booster, was summoned to the rear of the 
bouse, where Harris later found him in an 
unconscious condition. At the hospital, it 
was stated that, while his entire body was 
braised, bis most serious injury consisted 
of two broken ribs. 

According to Clark, an attack was anti- 
cipated. Information bad reached him, be 
says, that $550 had been offered to anyone 
wbo would beat him up. Recently, he 
caused the arrest of George Murphy at a 
cafe because of remarks, from which he 
inferred that the attack was coming. 
Murphy has decided to aid Clark in his 
attempt to learn the instigators. 

Flo Jacobson'8 father, in whose home 
Clark and his wife had resided prior to 
their estrangement, denied any interest in 
the slugging. 

The Clark divorce case is one of tbe most 
peculiar in the annals of the local Circuit 
Court. Flo Jacobson was a song plugger 
for the old Ted Snyder concern, which 
Clark managed. When he withdrew to go 
into business for himself, she accompanied 
him. Later, both returned to Waterson's 
employ and, when they married,' were 
deemed an unusually loving couple. ' Clark 
instituted divorce proceedings, because a 
long-distance 'phone call from New York 
to Chicago, on New Year's eve. led him to 
believe that Flo bad improper relations 
with Harry Foster, her pianist. The 
judge declared that proof of a wife kissing 
a man did not constitute grounds for 
divorce on a charge of adultery. Flo Jacobs 
son maintains that she possesses the real 
grounds for a divorce. 

Barred from visiting her husband at 
the American hospital Mrs. Jacobson- 
Clark was determined in her demands that 
every effort be made to find those respon- 
sible for the attack. 

"No one regrets the injuries to Mr. 
Clark more than I do." Mrs. Clark said 
with apparent sincerity, "and no one is 
more anxious to see his assailants punished. 
There seems to be some doubt as to the 
responsibility, and until it is known who 
attacked him I shall never be satisfied. 
To intimate that our family had anything 
to do with assaulting Mr. Clark is pre- 
posterous and those acquainted with us 
know how ridiculous such claims sound." 



DANCERS OPEN SCHOOL 

Natalia and Ferrari, who were seen at 
Hotel Dyckman Cafe all season, have 
opened a school of dancing in tbe Audi- 
torium. 



MURPHY SUES BISMARCK 

George P. Murphy, the burlesque come- 
dian, filed suit against the Bismarck Gar- 
den for $50,000 last week, as the result 
of an alleged assault on the part of house 
attaches which occurred when Mnrphy 
played an engagement at the Colnmbia. 



POLICEMAN SHOT NEAR THEATRE 

Two men who had been loitering sus- 
piciously on a stairway leading from the 
street to the basement of tbe Star Theatre. 
1453 Milwaukee Avenue, shot Policeman 
Chas. P. Larson, probably fatally, early 
last Friday morning. Edward Shiewe, who 
claimed to be a Sergeant in the United 
States Army, later admitted that be was 
one of the two men, but declared tbe other 
did the shooting. The police suspect the 
assailants were involved in the film opera- 
tors' war, which came to a head recently, 
when tbe State's Attorney's office published 
a list of men about to be indicted. 



PALACE CLOSED 

The Palace Music Hall closed its 
vaudeville season last week. The theatre 
will remain closed for repairs for one week 
and then open with Shuberts* "The Show 
of Wonders." 



BILLY SMYTHE HERE 

Billy Smythe. the Louisville music pub- 
lisher, was in Chicago, last Monday, with 
Bob Cole, his road representative. 



KIRALFY IS A FATHER 
A baby daughter arrived in the home of 
Victor Kiralfy, the theatrical agent, last 
Wednesday, shortly after his arrival from 
Chicago, where he had closed with the 
Raymond Hitchcock show "Betty." 



REHEARSE BISMARCK SHOW 

Members of the Bismarck stock company, 
including Virginia Fissinger, A. Patton 
Gibbs and Joy Gardner, are rehearsing 
their Marigold anniversary celebration, 
which will take place May 17. 

DOCKSTADER REVIVING CO. 

Lew Dockatader believes the public will 
take kindly to old-fashioned minstrelsy, and 
has decided to desert his single for an 
offering involving a full troupe, which will 
be ready next August. 

WEBER GETS TRIO 

Fields. Salisbury & Fields will start 
their Orpheum tour, under Harry Weber's 
direction, next August. They will work 
out the Summer at Wyn Cliff Inn. 



HOWARD BARNES TO PRODUCE 

Howard McKent Barnes will enter the 
producing field next season. His latest 
success "Her Unborn Child" has seven 
companies now playing. 



PLAN FAIR SPECIALS 

Most of the railroads operating pas- 
senger service out of Chicago are planning 
a series of special trains for fairs in the 
mid-west territory. 

HAVE LADY DIRECTOR 

Maud Massey Van Bergen, who toured 
as lady director with Chase Lister's dra- 
matic shows, is leading the orchestra at 
Do Luxe Caf«. 



WILSON BROS. JOIN POLICE 
The WusonrBrothers. German comedians, 
who appeared on McVicker*8 bill last week, 
win desert vaudeville to join the Slay wood 
police force. 



KANE & MORGAN GET ROUTE 

Kane & Morgan have been routed 
through Wisconsin and Michigan by the 
U. B. O. and W. V. M. A. offices. 



"ANNABELLE" ENDS CHICAGO RUN 

"Good Gracious Annabelle" will close 
next Saturday night its run at the Cort 
Theatre, Chicago. 



QUEENIE JOINS RED CROSS 

Qneenie Queenin, formerly with the New 
York Winter Garden Show, has enrolled 
as a Red Cross nurse. She is now man- 
ager of the Grand Pacific Hotel cafe. 



OLIVE BRISCOE HAS NEW ACT 

Olive Briscoe plans a New York open- 
ing for a singing act from the pen of 
Herbert Moore. 



VICTORIA & CROWN CLOSE 

The Victoria and Crown Theatres, local 
Pantages' houses, are closed for the 

Summer. 



CLYDE IN CHICAGO 

James T. Clyde, proprietor of "The 
World at Home." was m Chicago last week. 



16 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



May 16, 1917 





PICTURE THEATRES 

BAR SONG PLUGGERS 

Proprietor* Adopt Thi» Means of Retalia- 
tion Against Publishers Belonging to 
Author*' and Composers' Society. 

Proprietors of motion picture theatres 
in New York and vicinity, and especially 
those holding a membership in the Motion 
Picture League hare declared a boycott on 
the publications owned and controlled by 
members of the Society of Authors, Com- 
posers and Publishers. 

The picture men have not only declared 
that uo copyrighted music published by 
any member of the Authors' society shall 
be played in their theatres, but have 
closed their doors to singers or demon- 
strators sent to popularize new songs. 

The first intimation of this move on 
the part of the picture exhibitors was dis- 
covered last week when the professional 
representatives from several of the large 
publishing house made their rounds of the 
picture houses and found to their great 
surprise that they were refused admission. 
In some instances the ma nag er explained 
that as the Authors' society had seen fit 
to charge a performing rights fee for the 
playing of instrumental music, he did not 
see why he should allow his stage to be 
used to help the sale of vocal numbers. 
In other places the manager refused to dis- 
cuss the matter at all, but referred the 
matter to a husky door tender who shooed 
the singers away with scant conrtesy. 

Two or three managers, however, who 
listened to the singers' explanation relented 
and allowed them- to aing, but in every in- 
stance the managers seemed to have a 
very hazy idea as to what the Authors' 
and Composers' Society really is and what 
it stands for. The impression among the 
picture men, according to the singers, is 
that the publishers are trying to collect an 
unjust tax. and coming jnst at this time 
when the motion picture business Is fight- 
ing the proposed state tax, aa well aa t*e 
war measure, is particularly aggravating. 

The readiness with which the proprietors 
of a number of the theatres have accepted 
the terms of the Authors' society when its 
objects and purposes was fully explained 
indicates that the Society would do well 
to inaugurate a publicity campaign in this 
field in order that exhibitors the country 
over may be fully acquainted with the 
authors' and composers' organization. 

LIGHT OPERA CRITICS AGREE 

Chicago daily newspaper critics agree 
with those of Boston in their estimate 
of the Carroll-Francis musical play, "The 
Love Mill," now appearing at the Illinois. 

They are practically a unit in their 
enthusiastic praise of Alfred Francis' 
melodious score, but axe even stronger 
than the Boston writers in their criticism 
of the book and lyrics. 

O. L. Hall, in the Chicago Journal, 
wrote: "There is among other things not 
to be regarded aa assets a libretto by 
Earl Carroll, who would do well to go 
back to his former business of writing 
songs. • * • As a librettist he em- 
ploys a rheumatic hand." 

Percy Hammond, of the Tribune, said: 
"The Love Mill' has pretty dresses, a 
witless book, a capital chorus, plenty of 
sweet music, a dull story, sprightly danc- 
ing and Ralph Hen." 

Amy Leslie, in the AVicj, wrote: "Earl 
Carroll, who has always been rushing 
into things, did the lyrics, some of which 
are interesting and most of which are 
crude and dull. The book bears the 
pleasant signs of having been starched 
up by the hired wits, and they make a 
brisk pace for a scene or two and then 
fall down and sprawl painfully." 

VICTOR WOODS IN HOSPITAL 

Victor Woods (Lantheum), who has 
been connected with the sales department 
of several music publishing houses, is very 
ill at the Seaton hospital. 



PRIZE FOR NATIONAL SONG 

The New York Herald has started a 
competition among composers and Bong- 
writers for the best patriotic song. The 
competition is open to everyone, every- 
where, and the conditions are as follows: 

Gold medal for the best march song 
(words and music). 

Silver medal for the second best march 
song (words and music). 

Bronze medal for the third best march 
song (words and music). 

Silver cup for the best patriotic song 
(words and music). 

Silver trophies for the second and 
third best patriotic songs (words and 
music). 

Three eminent musical authorities will 
act aa judges in the contest, which will 
close June 15 at 5 o'clock in the after- 
noon. 



THE M. WITMARK A. SON SEXTET 

There are few vaudeville bills presented 
at present without some singer rendering 
one or more of the famous Witmark "Sex- 
tet" of songs, as the six popular numbers 
which are leading this house's big cata- 
logue are called. 

They are "All the World Will Be Jeal- 
ous of Me," Ernest R. Ball's new ballad; 
"Somewhere in Ireland," Ball and Bren- 
nan's clever Irish novelty; "My Yiddisha 
Butterfly," one of the greatest comedy 
songs of the season; "When He's AH 
Dolled Up," a new Walter Donaldson nov- 
elty; "Suki San," still another novelty 
song by the same writer, and the intema- 
tion song hit, "There's a Long, Long 
Trail." 



SAM FOX'S PATRIOTIC SONG 

Sam Fox, the Cleveland publisher, has 
just issued a new patriotic song by Ed- 
mund Vance Cooke and J. S. Zamecnik 
entitled "For the Freedom of the World." 
The song has an international appeal, 
and is dedicated to all the allies, every 
nation; to the soldiers in the trenches, to 
the women at home and to all who have 
offered their sacrifice for the freedom of 
the world. 

A beautiful art edition of the number 
is in press. 



A NEW PUBLISHING COMPANY 
Chris. Praetorius, one of New York's 
well-known musicians and arrangers, and 
J. A. Dillon, a newspaperman and 
scenario writer, have formed the Dillon - 
Praetorius Music Co., and opened offices 
at No. 1431 Broadway. 

The new company's catalogue at pres- 
ent contains "For the Honor of Uncle 
Sam." "Where the Liffey Flows Into the 
Sea," an Irish ballad, and "For Defense," 
a stirring patriotic number. 



NEW MOROSCO WRITERS 

Harry Tierney and Al Bryan have 
signed contracts with Oliver Moro sco to 
supply the song numbers for "What 
Next," a new production which will be 
presented in Los Angeles next month, 
after which it will be brought East to 
follow "So Long, Letty," and "Canary 
Cottage." 

Earl Carroll wrote the words and music 
of the first Morosco productions. 



MORE REVENUE FOR VON TTLZER 

Harry Von Tilzer, who lost consider- 
able money in launching the dramatic 
production of "To-Day," will, according 
to motion picture experts, get it all back 
with big interest from the film version 
of the piece, vhich is to be presented in 
the near future. 

"To-Day," a powerful play of modern 
life, possesses all the requirements of a 
big photo-drama success. 

SILVIO HEM WITHDRAWS 

Silvio" Hein. who was the musical di- 
rector for "His Little Widows" at the 
Astor, has withdrawn, and the orchestra 
is now being conducted by Gustav Salzcr. 



MOSE GUMBLE IN BOSTON 

Mose Gumble spent several days in 
Boston last week, where the Remick 
songs were enjoying a strong "plug" in a 
number of the theatres. At the Keith 
house a "recruiting" week was given, and 
Miss Adele Ritchie, assisted by Joseph 
M. Daley at the piano, a quartette in khaki 
costume, and a dozen soldiers made a big 
feature of "If s Time for Every Boy to 
Be a Soldier." Boston is intensely patri- 
otic, and the soldier boys were enthusi- 
astically greeted, but Miss Ritchie and 
her songs were received in the mildest 
manner imaginable. 

BROADWAY SONGS IN CHICAGO 

The new songs of the Broadway Music 
Corp. are meeting with great success in 
Chicago at present, and Will Von Tilzer, 
president of the company, who made a fly- 
ing trip to that city last week, was amazed 
by the number of acts in the vaudeville 
theatres, restaurants and cabarets that 
were featuring the Broadway publications. 

JEROME'S COMEDY SONG 

Scores of the leading vaudeville artists 
are meeting with success with the new 
William Jerome comedy song hit, "If I 
Catch the Guy Who Wrote Poor Butter- 
fly." 

Its lyric is one of the cleverest ever 
turned out by the talented William in 
his long career of successful writing. 

A PATRIOTIC WALTZ SONG 

"After the War Is Over, Will There Be 
Any Home, Sweet Home?" is the title of 
a new patriotic waltz song by Pounnon 
and Woodruff, and is published by the 
Broad & Market Music Co., of Newark, 
N. J. It is being featured by numerous 
singers, and is cut on' the "Perfection" 
and "Pianostyle" music rolls. 



SIX STERN RELEASES 

Jos. Stern & Co. announce the release 
of six new songs, which will be ready for 
the profession on May 20. They are 
"Princess of the Willow Tree," "When a 
Buddy Meets a Buddy," "Poor Cryin' 
Baby," "Jazbo Johnson's Hokum Band," 
"Get a Jazz Band to Jazz" and "That's 
How Far I'd Go for You." 



FIVE SUMMER SHOW SONGS 

Harry Von Tilzer . has five exceptional 
songs in the new Columbia Theatre this 
summer. The piece which is called the 
"Hip, Hip, Hooray, Girls," is a preten- 
tious production made by George Bel- 
frage, and will, it is believed, remain at 
the Columbia during the entire summer. 

OLMAN AND BURKHART WRITING 

Abe Olman and Addison Burkhart are 
colaborating, and has turned out a num- 
ber of new songs which will shortly be 
released by the Forster Co. of Chicago. 
One of the beat is "All I Need Is Just 
a Girl Like You," which is attracting 
considerable attention. 



MABEL McKINLEY SCORES HIT 

- At a big patriotic meeting held at Mt. 
Vernon, on Sunday, Mabel McKinley, 
neice of the late president, featured the 
new Harry Von Tilzer song, "The Man 
Behind the Hammer and the Plow," and 
scored one of the greatest hits of ber 
career. 



SOPHIE TUCKER'S FEATURE 

Sophie Tucker is making a big feature 
of the new McKinley Music Co.'s new 
"regret" song "I Ain't Got Nobody Much" 
(and Nobody Cares for Me). At the 
Riverside Theatre last week the number 
met with much success. 



EDGAR BTTNER IN CHICAGO 

Edgar Bitner, of the Leo Feist house, 
is on his annual spring Western trip. 
During the present week he is making his 
headquarters at- the Feist Chicago offices 
in the Grand Opera House Building. 



Sharps and Flats 

By TEDDY MORSE 



Mrs. Beethoven must have interrupted 
her husband with a request to get a bucket 
of coal, or chop some kindling for the 
kitchen stove. That made Ludwig terribly 
sore, so much so he couldn't get in the 
spirit of what he was working on. Hence 
his "Unfinished Symphonies." 



And when Mendelsohn was turning out 
the hits, the lyric writers mnst have been 
awfully "jazz." He wrote a terrible lot 
of "Songs Without Words." 



They are sounding the call to the men of 

sand, 
With France and England united we stand. 
Side by side we'll be fighting on foreign 

land. 
Did you think you would live to see it? 



Many Americans bearing German names 
are appealing to the courts for permission 
to change them, claiming their present 
names are causing them business loss, etc 
Now those boys in the song and acting 
game that laid away their queer handicaps 
some years back can feel perfectly at ease. 



Here's a fellow setting a very bad ex- 
ample for our modern songwriters. ' He 
paid $400 for the original manuscript of 
"Home, Sweet Home." Our boys, always 
crafty and up to snuff, will want to pre- 
serve the original piano copies of their 
songs. They can make copies in their own 

handwriting. 

The Western Union gets out a little 
booklet called "Forms suggested for tele- 
graph messages." Searching high and low 
cannot find any one like the drummer sent 
to his firm, after being out three weeks and 
not sending in any orders. They wired 
him, "What's the matter. Haven't heard 
from you." He wired back "Dear firm. 
Am still with you. Send more money." 



I love you, I love you ! 

*Tis all that I can say. 

'Twould break my heart if we should part. 

So do not roam away. 

You are no scheming siren, 

You are no fickle lass! 

I love yon, I love yonl 

My season baseball pass! 

(A love song by W. F. Kirk, N. Y. 
Evening Journal.) 

"James," remarked the millionaire song- 
writer, in a bored manner, to his man, "I 
expect that terrible pesting music publisher 
here this evening, and I wish yon would 
notify my Pea-nnist to be here at 8.30. 
And, James, remember this: When you 
hear him beginning to implore me to let 
him publish some of my new ballads, step 
up to Wm quietly and show him the door. 
If he resists at all, throw him out." 



JULIUS P. WITMARK IN BOSTON 

Julius P. Witmark is spending a ten 
days' vacation with friends and relatives 
in Boston. 



A man fell asleep in a Broadway restau- 
rant and failed to hear the orchestra play 
the "Star Spangled Banner." He was 
thrown out, generally abused, arrested and 
fined $10. The other night in a crowded 
eighty-five-eent-with-wine table-d'hote (for- 
merly 55), somebody put a nickel in the 
self-playing piano, and it proceeded to 
grind out a medley of "My Country 'Us 
of Thee," "Marsellaise" and "The S. S. B." 
for about six long minutes. Everybody 
stood. Everybody waited and waited. 
The soup grew cold. And colder. The 
aisles became crowded with newcomers. 
When the . music finally stopped, the sigh 
that went up from those diners was like 
the gale around -the Flatiron Building. 



May 16, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



17 







BOSTON GAYETY 

SELLS HALF 

INTEREST 

SCRIBNER, MACK, KYNEKA, BUYERS 



A half interest in the Gayety Theatre, 
Boston, was purchased last week by Sam 
A. Scribner, J. Herbert Mack and Bud. 
Hyueka from George R. Batchelder, and 
the new owners immediately took posses- 
sion of the property, placing Thomas R. 
Henry in as house manager. Royal R- 
Sbeldon, who held the other half interest 
in the theatre, will still continue to hold 
his share. 

Mr. Batchelder, who is considered one 
of the wealthiest burlesque theatre owners, 
has been operating the Gayety Theatre 
since it was built, also holding an interest 
in other burlesque theatres. His sale of 
the poperty will mark his retirement from 
active business and the management of 
theatres. 

The new owners, after the house closed 
Saturday night, immediately had Manager 
Henry make arrangements for a complete 
remodeling of the interior, which is to be 
newly decorated, with the seating arrange- 
ment increased and new seats. Several in- 
novations are also to be installed with re- 
gard to the stage equipment. The front 
of the house is to be refurnished. It is 
estimated that the cost of the refurnishing 
will be in the neighborhood of $25,000. 

In the office of the Secretary of State 
at Albany papers of incorporation were 
filed by the Boston Gaiety Theatre Ob., 
Inc., of Manhattan. The concern is capi- 
talized at $60,000. R. R. Sheldon, 1 
Weiner and X. J. Schneider are named as 
the incorporators. 

KAHN RE-LEASES UNION SQUARE 

The Union Square Theatre has been re- 
leased to B. F. Kabn for five years. Kahn 
originally leased the theatre for one year, 
as a tryout The venture proved success- 
ful, and when the short lease terminated 
on May 1 the new lease was signed. He 
will continue to run stock burlesque. 



BARTONS AT OLYMPIC 

Jim and Tillie Barton, who closed with 
the "Twentieth Century Maids" at the 
Brooklyn Empire last Saturday night, are 
playing a special engagement of two weeks 
in stock at the Olympic Theatre, after 
which tbey will summer at their new home 
in Maple Shade, New Jersey. 



GURAN MADE MANAGER 

Dave Guran, who, for the last two 
seasons has been advance man of the 
"Bon Ton" company, has been appointed 
manager of the next season Rose Sydel 
company by Owner William Campbell. 



EDNA GREEN SIGNS AGAIN 

Edna Green, ingenue of the "Bowery 
Burlesquers," has signed with Hurtig & 
Seamon for next season to go with the 
same show. This will be her thirteenth 
season with this firm. 



BAIL SIGNS VIOLET KELLY 

Violet Kelly, who was with the "Bur- 
lesque Review" company this season, has 
been signed as ingenue for "Grown Up 
Babies" by Manager William Bail for next 
season. 



SUSS MAKES YEARLY DONATION 

"Doc" Suss, the theatrical dentist, do- 
nated twenty-five dollars toward the 
Actors' Fund Fair last week. This is his 
usual yearly donation toward' the fund. 



O'HAY TURNS SOLDIER 

Irving O'Hay, comedian with the "Globe 
Trotters," on the Columbia Burlesque Cir- 
cuit this season, left Monday for the 
Officers' training camp at Plattsburg. 
O'Hay is a veteran of the Spanish-Ameri- 
can war and the Philippine campaign. He 
is the first of the burlesque contingent to 
answer the call to the colors. 



SINGER SIGNS WEBER 

Johnnie Weber has annexed his signature 
to a contract with Jack Singer, for a year, 
to be featured with Lou Talbot's "Lid 
Lifters." Weber, who is one of the best 
known comedians in burlesque, has been 
under the management of William S. Camp- 
bell for the past fifteen years. 



SPRINGFIELD HOUSE CLOSES 

Springfield, Mass., May 10. — When the 
doors of the Gilmore Theatre, this city, 
were shut after last Saturday night's per- 
formance of the Military Maids it marked 
the end of the burlesque season at this 
house. The season was very successful. 



OLYMPIC OUTING JUNE 3 
The ninth annual outing and games of 
the Olympic Theatre Club, at Donnely's 
Grove, College Point, has been set for 
June 3. Jack McCauley, stage manager of 
the Fourteenth street burlesque theatre 
will answer all points of inormation. 



SP1RO REMAINS WITH "BELLES" 

E. L. Spiro will again manage the 
Broadway Belles next season. Joe Marks 
will be Hebrew comedian and Eddie Cole, 
the German. George Snyder, Pearl Lawler, 
Jane May and Clark and Turner are 
signed up. 



UNION SQ. STARTS TRY-OUTS 

Manager Ben Kahn has inaugurated a 
professional tryout night at his Union 
Square Theatre on Friday. His first one 
was last week. The acts are shown for 
the benefit of the U. B. O. 



FILMS AT TRENTON GRAND 

TRENTON, May 12. — The Grand Theatre 
which closed its burlesque season last week 
is again iu operation as a motion picture 
theatre. Only feature pictures are being 
shown. 



HALL SIGNS WITH MACK 

Al K. Hall, who has just completed a 
successful season with the "Maids of 
America" company, has signed up for the 
next two years with John Herbert Mack. 



LE VAN IN VAUDE. 

Harry S. Le Van, who will appear with 
the "Tango Queens" next season, Is now 
appearing in a vaudeville act, entitled 
"The Five Jolly Tars and a Woman." 



CAMPBELL SIGNS HAYES 

George Hayes has signed a contract with 
W. S. Campbell to appear in the "Rose 
Sydell" show on the Columbia Circuit next 
season, supplanting Johnny Weber. 



WEINSTOCK'S BROTHER DEAD 

Maurice Wainstock mourns the death 
of his brother, Sam, who died at his home 
in New York, May 30. He was 51 years 
old and a non-professional. 



HUNTER BREAKING IN ACT 

Frank Hunter, who closed with the 
"Globe Trotters," is breaking in a vaude- 
ville skit with himself and Irene West as 
principals. 



DANDY MAY RETURN 

Ned Dandy, the writer and producer, is 
negotiating to return to burlesque next sea- 
son and present his single specialty. 



RISQUE SHOWS 
CAUSE LEASE 
CANCELLATION 

NEWARK, O., MGR. GETS NOTICE 

Newabk, O., May 12. — The movement 
started by the Civic Committee of the 
Women's Federation of Cloba, and backed 
by the people of Newark, to put a stop to 
alleged indecent shows, which, they claim, 
have been given at the Auditorium Theatre 
throughout the Winter on Monday nights, 
reached its culmination last week, when 
trustees of the Memorial Building, in which 
the theatre is located decided to cancel the 
lease of the present management. 

George M. Fenberg, lessee and manager 
of the bouse, which is a one-nighter on the 
American Circuit, claims that the shows 
which have been appearing there are clean, 
as he himself reviews them at Columbus be- 
fore they come to Newark, and will fight the 
action of the board. 

The drastic decision was taken when 
about twenty-five prominent citizens of 
Newark appeared before the board of trus- 
tees and denounced the class of shows be- 
ing presented. They demanded their dis- 
continuance. 

It is said that the management had been 
advised once before by the board to elimi- 
nate obscenity from the plays presented 
and had disregarded instructions. Fenberg 
had been warned by a resolution passed by 
the board Feb. 2 last, it is said, that unless 
the plays were purged of obscene speeches 
action would be taken to remedy the 
trouble. 

In the opinion of the board their request 
was not complied with, and notice was 
served on Fenberg that the lease must be 
given up June 8. 

The resolution, unanimously passed by 
the trustees follows: 

Resolved : That in the opinion of this 
Board the character of the so-called wheel 
or burlesque shows given by the present 
lessee of the Auditorium Theatre for the 
past season had been a violation of the 
terms of the lease and a failure to comply 
with the former order of this Board made 
February 2, 1917, and that the lease is 
hereby cancelled and forfeited for violation 
of the terms of the lease in respect to the 
character of the performances aa above 
specified ; said forfeiture and cancellation 

to take effect and be in force on June 8, 
1917. 



PRINCE OFFERED BURLESQUE 
Charlie Prince, in the cast of "His Little 
Widows" at the Astor, has been offered a 
good-sized contract to appear in one of 
Jack Singer's burlesque productions next 
season on the Columbia Wheel. 



CAMPBELL RE-SIGNS SEVERAL 

Gene True, prima donna; Marty Pudig, 
straight man, and Walter Brown, German 
comic, have been re-engaged by the Wil- 
liam Campbell-Pat White combine to again 
play principal parts with the Gaiety Girls 
next season. Brown will shake off the 
Dutch make-up and do Jew and "Wop." 
For the summer he will play stock at the 
Colonial Theatre, Toledo. 



CROWDED OUT OF OWN HOTEL 

Datton, O., May 1L — Dave Marion 
about two weeks ago took a layoff and 
visited his hotel at Tom's River, N. J. He 
found it so crowded he could not get a 
room. He intends to spend bis Summer 
vacation there. 



MARION SIGNS TWO 

Dayton, O., May 10.— Joe Mann and 
Inez de Verdier have signed with Dave 
Marion for his next season's show. 




Mae McCormack is in the German Hos- 
pital, Brooklyn. 



Zallah will be seen again next season 
with "The Tempters." 

Don M. Clark has joined the Majestic 
Stock at Indianapolis. 

Etta Rogers has signed with the Beef 
Trust for next season. 



James Coughlin has signed for the Na- 
tional Stock at Detroit. 

Margaret Levan will be with Watson's 
Beef Trust next season. 



Sam S. Clark is re-engaged for the Pat ' 
White Show for next season. 



Etta PUlard was forced to lay off part 
of last week, suffering from overwork. 

Boris and Darley will go with the Star 
and Garter show next season. 



Frank and Cleo DeVoe have signed for 
next season with Jacobs and Jerome. 

Jacqueline Tallman will be seen in stock 
at White City, Chicago, this summer. 



Evelyn Stevens will be the prima don- 
na next season with "The Americans." 



Lew Hilton will play five weeks over 
the Loew Circuit, and then take a vaca- 
tion. 



Griff Williams, who piloted the "Thor- 
oughbreds," goes back to the Gus Hill staff 
next season. 



Millie Loveredge has signed for the 
summer stock at the Avenue Theatre, 
Detroit, Mich. 



Dan Guggenheim is preparing for the 
next season of the "Orientals," bis 
thirteenth year with W. B. Watson. 



Jules Bennett has signed to play char- 
acters and straight parts in the summer 
burlesque stock at the Trocadero, Phila- 
delphia. , 



The Burlesque Club had a housewarnt- 
ing in the new clubroom at 713 Seventh 
Avenue, last Sunday. Everybody voted 
the place to be a big success. 

Hurtig and Seamon have re-engaged 
Grace Anderson, Frank Harcourt, Libby 
Hart, Edna Green, Marty Semon, Pauline 
Pauli and Belle Foster for next season. 



The stock at the Haymarket, Chicago, 
includes Murray J. Simons, Harry Step- 
pe, Billy Carlton, Margie Catlin, Mona 
Raymond, Sarah Hyatt and Mabel Blake. 

Fred Strauss, who did the advance 
work for the "Grown Up Babies" Co., win 
have charge ' of Strouse and Franklin's 
summer burlesque stock company at the 
Howard, Boston. 



L. M. Borie will go ahead of one of the 
Bedim slows next season, probably "The 
Forty Thieves," which will be operated 
by Jean Badini under the franchise leased 
from Frank Calder's daughter. 

The stock at the Gaiety, Philadelphia, 
includes Ghaa. Mack, Mae Hflllard, Em- 
ma Kohler, Wm. Strouse, Jake Hubbs, 
Emil Casper and Lucille Clayton. Ora 
Ental has been a special feature. 



18 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



May 16, 1917 



VAUDEVILLE REVIEWS 



(Contmuad from Pace » 



EIGHTY-FIRST ST. 

The show presented by Managing 
Director A. L. Shakman for the last half 
was an exceptionally good one and well 
arranged as to running order, and it was 
quite apparent that if the actor at this 
house does bis turn with the proper en- 
thusiasm and "pep," he will receive hearty 
approbation from the audience. 

The opening turn on the bill was pre- 
sented by Clara Stevens and Mary Falke 
in the form of a dainty protean singing 
and dancing novelty. These girls have a 
rather quaint act, and one that can be 
readily placed on neighborhood theatre cir- 
cuits. The turn, however, lacks the quali- 
fications for two-a-day theatres. 

Ryan and Joyce were billed to Mhow the 
Spring styles in songs. These boys have a 
very pleasing turn, but should have lived 
up to their billing by showing the styles 
instead of injecting some of last Fall's 
material into the act. 

Robert Dailey and Compnny presented 
his comedy Bkit, "Our Bob." Puiley has 
assembled all the hokum that he ever 
saw or heard, bnt presents it in a very 
pleasing way. Bob is a comedian who 
should have real, wholesome material, 
which would go much better than his 
present offering of rather moss-covered 
comedy and humor. 

Moran and Wiser offered their boomerang 
hat-throwing novelty. The showmanship 
of the comedian helps greatly toward 
carrying this offering over, even though 
both members of the team possess excep- 
tional skill in the execution of their work. 

In the next to closing spot Abe Leavitt 
and Ruth. Lockwood, presenting "Much 
Ado About Nothing," stopped the show. 
Leavitt is always Injecting new material 
into the act of the "up-to-the-minute" kind, 
which is bound to please the most dubious 
of audiences. 

Sasbcba Piatov Go. appeared in his sing- 
ing and dancing offering. "A Little Bit of 
Everything." The dancing numbers by 
Miss Leland, Mile. Baile and Piatov are 
well presented and the value of the act 
is considerably enhanced by the warbling 
ability of Flora Starr, who renders two 
numbers. A. U. 



PROCTOR'S, YONKERS 

(Last Half) 

The show was opened by l'ierlert and 
Scofield. 

The man of this act balances and 
juggles different objects, while the girl 
keeps up a persistent chatter, more or less 
funny. His best stunt is the balancing 
of a pan on a flexible whip. The audi- 
ence liked this turn on Thursday after- 
noon, although it seemed a bit too long 
for the style of act. 

Helen Trix and Sister (new act), occu- 
pied the second spot, and were only ac- 
corded a fair ovation. 

In the third spot. Holmes and Wells, a 
talented man-and-girl combination, scored 
heavily. This marked the return of this 
clever duo to the East after a considerable 
absence. Their work has undergone such 
a decided change for the better and their 
routine has been so greatly improved that 
the act is hardly recognizable when con- 
trasted with the old one. Although this 
pair have always pleased, they now have 
a vehicle which should be sure fire on any 
bill. Miss Wells makes a very charming 
stage picture, while Holmes is capable. 

Valerie Bergere and her company made 
their usual hit with the Japanese playlet. 
"Cherry Blossoms." although the man who 
now plays the role of Blake is not quite 
as convincing as his predecessor. 

Billy Wells found things all his own 
way with his nonsensical dialogue and 
parody song. However, there is entirely 
too much talk in the turn about liquor, 
wives, and all the other topics that small 
time monologists seem to revel in. 

The show was closed by Ted Lorraine 
and Frances Pritchard. They will be re- 
viewed under "New Acts." H. G. 



PROCTOR'S 125th ST. 

(Last Half) 

Manager "Bob" Genet knows how to 
warm up an audience for a vaudeville 
show, for he starts them applauding at 
the beginning with the showing of a 
patriotic weekly. 

The opening turn on the bill was the 
Three Hoy Sisters, very clever singing 
and dancing midgets, who ore reviewed 
under new acts. 

The Two Toms present a comedy talking 
and singing skit entitled "Me and Tige." 
The opening shows poor showmanship, 
with one of the men starting off by sing- 
ing a patriotic song and bis partner 
coming in on the finish. With this open- 
ing the first impression rather takes 
away the interest the audience would 
have in the turn. The men are fair 
comedians, and there is no reason why 
they cannot find an opening where they 
con start off their act in the proper man- 
ner. 

Bob and Peggy Valentine appeared in 
a comedy talking and singing novelty en- 
titled "Bright Bits of Nonsense." The 
bits of nonsense are bright, with a ten- 
dency to be a bit broad meaning and 
risque in interpretation. The entire busi- 
ness throughout the act may be construed 
as having a double meaning. Their con- 
cluding number, which is a song and dance 
of the Colonial days, is pleasing and well 
costumed. 

The Rath Brothers, in their hand-bal- 
ancing and athletic feats, seemed to be 
the hit of the early part of the bill, re- 
ceiving numerous recalls after the con- 
clusion of their act. 

"In Old Madrid." n singing novelty pre- 
sented by two men and two women, is a 
very novel offering of its kind. The num- 
bers are all classical and well rendered. 

George McFadden. "The Celtic Wit." 
had rather an easy time with his songs 
and stories, which pleased the audience 
from the start. 

Bernie and Baker simply romped on 
and captured the audience from the start 
of their turn. They had considerable dif- 
ficulty getting away at the end of the act. 

Torcnts Roosters, which is well known 
■ is an entertaining act, closed the show. 

A. TJ. 



HARLEM OPERA HOUSE 

(Last Half) 

The following acts will be reviewed 
under New Acts: BUlie Kiigard, Haviland 
and Thornton's "The Call to Arms," 
Amoros and Jeanette, Mona Hungerford 
and Company, and Mme. Cronin's Elec- 
trical Effects. 

The biggest hit of the bill was prob- 
ably made by the Haviland Thornton 
Company in their timely playlet, in which 
they employed a number of Uncle Sam's 
real soldiers. At the conclusion of the 
net, one of the soldier boys rendered a 
patriotic number as such a song should 
be rendered, and the house fairly rocked 
with applause. Many a professional 
songster could take lessons from this lad 
as to how to successfully put over a war 
song. 

Potter and Hart well opened 'the show. 
The girl is n happy combination of a nut 
comedienne and an acrobat. The man 
performs some feats very cleverly, particu- 
larly the one in which he "goes through 
the rye." The closing feat brings forth 
big applause. This act gave the show an 
exceptionally fast start. 

The Kauffman Brothers came rather 
late on the bill, but cleaned up neverthe- 
less. They started in by kidding the 
preceding act, and got a lot of fun out 
of it for a couple of minutes before going 
into their regular routine. Their dialogue 
kept the audience laughing, although the 
talk and business directly following the 
Hawaiian number was almost too foolish. 
The pair harmonized well in an Italian 
number, and the ragtime argument was a 
nifty encore. h. G. 



FRA" 



'ANS 



SUGGESTS QUALITY 



V A UDEVILLE 



WYATT'S 



Scotch 



f[T I'm as proud of my N. V. A. card 
jl as I am of the colors of my clan. 
The little red slip is as dear to me as a 
Fraser plaid and it should be an honor 
for every member to voluntarily display 
his card without a managerial request. 



May 16, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



19 



VAUDEVILLE ACTS 

(Continued from page 9) 



"WATER" 

Theatre — Harlem Opera House. 
Style — Playlet. 
Time — Seventeen minutes. 
Setting — Interior house set. 

"Water" is the name of a playlet con- 
taining three characters : A drunk, n 
promoter and a girl. 

If one wished to be facetious, he could 
truthfully say that the plot doesn't bold 
water, for the playlet is one of the most 
poorly written and badly constructed 
turns presented on the vaudeville stage 
for a long time. 

Just what it is all about is by no 
means clear. It seems that a young fel- 
low, addicted to the liquor habit, has be- 
come mixed up with a water stock 
promoter. The deal they are putting 
through is a crooked one and the drunk 
hesitates in doing his share of the dirty 
work when he hears that women, as well 
as men, will suffer thereby. 

A group of Canadian homesteaders hold 
stock, but cannot protect their interests 
until they become naturalized. They are 
championed by a girl, one of their num- 
ber. She remembers the drunk from 
college days when he was a football hero 
and now urges him to turn over a new 
leaf and be her hero once again. She 
holds enough stock to swing things the 
right way but she cannot rote it in, for 
she is not naturalized. To thwart the 
promoter's plans, the drunk marries the 
girl, whereupon she, automatically, be- 
comes an American citizen. 

The actual action of the playlet is so 
befuddled that the plot seems to lose itself 
time and again. The playlet is ncted 
poorly, but, with the lines in the net, 
good acting could not be expected. 

It is a playlet entirely lacking in 
atmosphere and realism. "Water" is not 
worth re-constructing, and the trio should 
obtain a new vehicle as quickly as pos- 
sible. H. G. 



LORD & FULLER 

Theatre — Proctor's 125«fc Street. 
Style — 31-an-and-girl novelty. 
Time — Ten minutes. 
Setting — In two and one. 

The act opens in two. 

The pair ride one wheel cycles, per- 
forming several feats and keeping up a 
patter while they do so. After a num- 
ber of feats on wheels, the man appears 
in one and sings a comic number. This 
is followed by a violin solo, played by 
the girl. As a finale, she plays the vio- 
lin, while he juggles three Indian clubs. 

From this routine, it can be seen that 
the pair are very versatile. They possess 
a most acceptable act. 

Several improvements, however, can be 
made. In the first place, the pair should 
engage the services of a clever vaudeville 
writer to supply them with more enter- 
taining dialogue in the first part of their 
turn. The idea of cross-fire talk while 
performing their feats is excellent, but 
the dialogue employed is weak. Also, 
the man has evidently failed to give 
enough thought or time to the rehearsal 
of his solo number, for it needs consid- 
erable bolstering up to get over success- 
fully. When improvements like those 
cited are mnde, the act will be sure fire 
on any bill. 

The girl's violin playing more than 
pleases and both performers have con- 
siderable personality, which they employ 
to good advuutage. H. G. 



ETTORE MARSHELBA 

Theatre — High ty first. 

Style — Singing. 

Time — Twelve minutes. 

Setting — In one. 

Ettore Marshelbn is billed as "Aus- 
tralia's Greatest Tenor." Whether he is 
or not, he U sufficiently great to take 
his place in the front rank of artists that 
appear in American vaudeville theatres. 
His routine is carefully selected, and 
will more than satisfy audiences in two- 
a-day theatres. The last number used 
by him Ib "Queen of the Earth," and 
bis rendition of it held the nndience spell- 
bound at the matinee on Wednesday. 
William Conway, at the piano, is also 
a capable entertainer, as was shown by 
the reception accorded him at the end 
of his piano solo. 

This act should always be an appro- 
priate one for the two-a-day theatres. 

A. V. 



QUINN & LAFFERTY 

Theatre — Harlem Opera House. 
Style — Song and dance. 
Time— Ten minutes. 
Setting — In one. 

This team opens with a song and 
dance. The man follows with some step- 
ping and works hard. The girl then de- 
livers a clever poem, with poor enuncia- 
tion, and then does a toe dance. He 
sings a patriotic number, after which the 
pair finish with a Charlie Chaplin Dance. 

The man is entirely too careless in 
'both his work and dress. Appearing in 
full dress, he should endeavor to look 
spic and span, but his appearance on 
'Wednesday afternoon was noticeably 
slip-shod. Appearance counts for a lot 
with an audience.. His patriotic song 
went cold because he put no feeling into 
the lyrics and went through it at almost 
breakneck speed. This number needs 
more rehearsing and thought on his part. 
The girl gives a pleasing performance. 

H. G. 



MME. CRONIN 

Theatre — Harlem Opera House. 
Style — Electrical noreltii. 
Time— Sirierw m in » ten. 
Setting — Special. 

Mme. Cronln bus an ambitious offer- 
ing that will rim more smoothly after it 
has played n couple of weeks. 

The act is divided into several parts. 
The first couple of song numbers are 
rendered by a sextette, three girls and 
three men. one of the latter being a 
midget, who is featured in these numbers. 

Next, n inngii'inu entertains for a few 
minutes. 

A girl pianist then renders a solo. 

As a closer, Mme. Cronin introduces 
her electrical effects, which consist of a 
number of very cleverly worked out 
electrical illusions. 

The first part of the act is very weak, 
the idea being good enough, but the 
talent poor. The magician works well, 
but does very little. The girl's piano 
playing is poor. 

The electrical effects are n novelty of 
the first water and save the act. The 
trouble with the turn is that Mme. 
Cronin has surrounded herself with but 
little talent, and, although the ideas in 
the offering are excellent, there are not 
the right persons to work them out. It 
would probably be the wisest course for 
Mme. Cronin to eliminate all of the turn 
except the electrical portion and depend 
upon this novelty alone for a short and 
unique closing act. 11 G. 



FRANK & HANBURY 

Theatre — Harlem Opera House. 
Style — Singing. 
Tinte — Siwteen minutes. 
Setting — In one. 

A man and a woman, both possessing 
considerable stage aplomb, render a num- 
ber of vocal selections in a most pleasing 
manner. 

Accompanying himself on the piano, 
the man sings a love song to the woman 
as an opener. This is followed by a duet 
about a pair of love bees. He next sings 
a solo which would meet with better 
success if he would sing but one verse 
and two choruses, instead of also sing- 
ing a second verse. The woman then 
sings a selection from the "Firefly" 
which pleases. 

The act is a refined, high-class turn 
and should win approval wherever shown. 

H. G. 



A Chatalogic Comedy 
Skit with Songs 



SILBER 

:-: AND :-: 

EVA 



NORTH 



» 



BASHFOOLERY 



Just finished a successful week at 

B. F. Keith's Bushwick, Brooklyn 
NEXT WEEK, PITTSBURGH 

ALL COMMUNICATIONS 

M. S. BENTHAM 



20 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



May 16, 1917 



THE 



COLUMBIA AMUSEMENT CO 



Extends Compliments and Congratulations to the 



IN. 



V. 




THE 



AMERICAN BURLESQUE ASSOCIATION 

•Joins the Procession ol Well Wishers 

N. V. A. 



Wanted for Next Season 

Cboros ladles for 

THE BEEF* TRUST 

AIM Small Girl, for toe 

UNITED STATES BEAUTIES 

Also want food feature acts, an d people In all 
lines of Burlesque. Address BILLY WATBON, 
Orphanm Theatre, Pstunon. H. 7. 



EILEEN SHERIDAN 

Per Dir. 
CHAMBERLAIN BROWN 



EUGENE 



ELIZABETH 



Mac GREGOR & JANE 

Personal Direction 
CHAMBERLAIN BROWN 



JZ€ sdeme£<±- 

TTiea t r ica 1 Show Cards' 



CIRCUS and JUGGLING 

Apparatus, Rolling Globes, Clubs. Batons, 
Guns. Wire Walkers' Apparatus snd Novelties. 
Stamp for catalog. tow. VAN WYCK, 
Cincinnati, O. 



ATTENTION 

MANAGERS and PRODUCERS 

Just Closed 50 Weeks' Engagement at 
B F KAHN'S 

UNION SQUARE THEATRE 

New York City 
REAL COMEDIES REAL PRODUCERS 

FRANK M ACKEY 
CHAS. COLLINS 

AT LIBERTY FOR FOUR WEEKS. WHO WANTS US? 

Have Produced for 50 Weeks, Changing Each Week, 

Without One Repeat. Reference — B. F. Kahn 

ADDRESS 

MACKEY and COLLINS 

Union Square Theatre, New York 



GEORGE 



AT LIBERTY 



JACK 



SEARCY & NOBLE 



A Real Black Face Singing Juvenile, 

Season 1915-16— Manchester's Burleaquers; Season J9 1 6- 1 7— : Darlings_ of Paris. 
Now playing United Time. 



Direction Lee P. Muckenfuw 



WANTED AX ALL. XI IVIES 

BURLESQUE PEOPLE 



CHAS. H. WALDRON 



Waldron's Casino, Boston, Mass. 



WRI TE- WIRE-OR-SEE 

I. M. WEINGARDEN 



19 West 20th St. 



Chicago, 111. 



For Burlesque and Musical Comedy Stock. Also 

For Rent or Sale 



Phone, CALUMET 2934. 



HOTEL 



— 258 West 44th Street, New York Cily 
AMERICAN AND EUROPEAN PLAN. 45 Secords from Broadway. Profes- 
sional peoplo will find here high class accommodations and servic: ..t reaVo labia 
prices. Tel. Bryant 6068. 



THE PARFAIT BLUES 

A Dollar's a Dollar, a Dime's a Dim*, this one's the place, you'll save It all the tlms 

PARFAIT MODE SHOP 



A Trial Will Convince YOU 
J. FEIGENBAUM A FELJX YOUNG, Men. 
I4S W. «sth St_ Suite TO. New York 



Phone S3M Bryant 



THEATRICAL UPHOLSTERING 

IN ALL ITS BRANCHES 



eJ. E. FABER 

Repairing Box Springs, Mattresses, Cushions. Slip Covers, etc. This u a specialty 
with us. 41 W. tSTsftSti NEW YORK Telephone, Bryant 1677. 



cn\ir VA/OITFRCL poe -- 1s WANTEr C ° D publication. 

OVjlNkjl YVr\l I C riO ORIGINAL ACTS. •LL K'.NDS TO OR DER. 

PERFORMERS ROBT.H. BRENNEN. 1433 Broadway. N. Y. 



POEMS WANTET 
ORIGINAL ACTS. •"• 



Telephone 

S9SH Bryant 



XHE ADELAIDE 



754-756 EIGHTH AVENUE. B~t. 46th and 



,\|RS. GEORGE HIECEL, Mi 



May 16, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



21 



CHURCHMEN SCORE TWO PLAYS 

The Catholic Theatre Movement, in 
making public its White List of plays last 
week took a - shot at George Bernard 
Shaw's play "Getting Married," and 
Galsworthy's "The Fugitive," on account 
of the fact that they both deal with free 
love. The statement says: 

"This term 'Free Love,' which evidently 
is offensive even to its advocates, is cov- 
ered by the euphemism, 'free divorce,' but 
its ugly and vicious character is not con- 
cealed at all. Shaw's play is a comedy, 
and from the dramatic point of view most 
tedious and preachy, relieved by an absurd 
second sight episode. Galsworthy's play is 
a bad melodrama." 



LACKAYE STAR IN NEW PLAY 

Stamford, Conn., May 10. — "Uncle 
Robert," a new play by Mark Price and 
Melville B. Raymond, was seen here last 
week for the first time on any stage, under 
the management of Mr. Raymond with 
James Lackaye as star. In his support 
are Airing Aloine, Rodney Renous, Harry 
Foreman, Ben Marks, Theodore Babcock, 
Neil Barrett, Frank Howard, Harry de 
Muth, Olive Shelley, May McCabe, Elsa 
Nord, Jan Janis, Grace Hamilton, Con- 
stance Howard, Margaret Willard, Ade- 
laide Hedriguez, Beth Asbton, Grace Gill- 
man, Laura M. Stone, and Margaret Little. 



ANOTHER "DIAMOND JIM" DEAD 

l'lTTSBuaan, May 11. — James J. Brady, 
a well known figure in baseball circles 
and a former member of the Pittsburgh 
team, died at his home in Ohicag-o last 
week. His death was the result of an 
unsuccessful operation, which was made 
necessary by an injury sustained during 
his ball-playing days. He was forty-five 
years old, married, and has been living in 
Chicago for the last six years. 



KEANE WONT REPLACE COLLIER 

G. M. Anderson and L Lawrence Weber 
•wish to deny a report circulated last week 
that Robert Emmett Keane, now playing 
in "His Little Widows" at tbe Astor 
Theatre would be sent to London in the 
part created here by William Collier in 
"Nothing But the Truth." Collier will 
appear in his original role when the farce 
is offered in London. 



ACTRESS WEDS RAILROAD MAN 

Peggy Landers, who retired from the 
stage four years 'ago, was married last 
Wednesday to James Britton Scott, gen- 
eral Eastern passenger agent of the Bal- 
timore and Ohio Railroad. The last stage 
appearance of the former Miss Landers 
was in "Beauty and the Beast." 



"WANDERER" TO REOPEN AUG. 16 

"The Wanderer," which closed Saturday 
night at the Manhattan Opera HouBe, will 
reopen there August 16 for a short season, 
after which it will begin its tour, going 
to the Metropolitan Opera House, Phila- 
delphia, to the Boston Opera House and 
to the Chicago Auditorium. 



BERNARD AND CARR TO REUNITE 

A. H. Woods will put out another 
"Potash and Perlmutter" play next season, 
which is to be called "Potash and Perl- 
mutter in the Movies," in which Barney 
Bernard and Alexander Carr will reunite 
and appear in their original roles of the 
two partners. 



THIS MANAGER IS PROSPEROUS 

Saskatoon, Canada, May 11. — George 
A. Stuart, resident manager of the Empire 
Theatre, has bought a six-cylinder Mc- 
Laughlin touring car. He is unmarried. 



. GOODWIN AT 81st ST. 

Edwin Goodwin, formerly treasurer of 
the Klemere theatre, is now in tbe box- 
office of the Eighty-first Street theatre. . 

CARRIE LILLE HAS NEW ACT 

Carrie Lille will soon be seen in a new 
act which, is being prepared for her by 
Blanche Merrill. 



CHARLES 




and 



IRENE 



SHAW 

NOW IN VAUDEVILLE 

DIRECTION BILLY ATWELL 



PEP COMEDIANS 



THEODORE 



BILLY 



PANKCY McCARVER 

THE DEVIL AND THE 
WHITEWASH MAN 

Singing, Dnncing and Talking 



Natalia and Ferrari's 

RUSSIAN CONSERVATORY 
OF DANCING 

Regular course for beginners and teschcrs. 

AwtitoHuin Tfa— t r m BUf* 

Studio 73, Chicago 



MERCEDES 



ALVIN and 

ANDY 

WILLIAMS 

Bits from Songland 

Direction NORMAN JEFFERIES 



THE 

NAGYFYS 



PrasaarJaa ■ 



Pyrotechnical Novelty 

Direction All. T. Wilton 



B.F. Keith's Circuit ot Theatres 

A. PAUL KEITH. Frails— t, E. F. ALUS. V i ce Pros. A Go*. Mar. 

UNITED BOOKING 



YOU CAN BOOK DIRECT BY 
ADDRESSING S. K. HODGDON, 
Book-ins Manager of the UNITED 

OFFICES 

B. F. Keith's Palace Theatre Building 

NEW YORK CITY 



Marcus Loew's Enterprises 

General Executive Office* 
Putnam Building, Time* Square, New York 



JOSEPH M. SCHENCK 

General Booking Manager 



Mr. Scneock Personally Interrlewe Artists Daily Between 11 and I 



Chicago OSes: North American BuUdtas 
FRANK Q. DOYLE, in charts 



Boa ton OSes: Tranent Tbaatra Bofldoi, 
FRED MAKDO, 1st ehorgo 



Acts laying off in Southern territory wire this office. 



PAUL DUR AND 

Presents 

The 

Van Sisters 

Dainty vocal and instrumental 
artists, featuring Christ!* Van, the 

greatest living girl cornetist. 



SLA YM AN AU 

•: Producer of si 
eUENTAL NOVELTIES 

JU lit Ave, New Yarfc 
Pbooe Bryant 8950 



vs/s////Y/y/yY//s////y//jyyyvvy^^^ 



>mm»>wmm»»»»»»»»mr\ 



BEE HO GRAY 



and 



ADA SOMERVILLE 

Assisted t> v 

ONION 
In "A Surprise From Oklahoma' 

DIRECTION— MAX E. HAYES 



EJWJWy/W^MW /W^^^^ 



"WORLD'S BIGGEST SHOW" 

UNDERSEA GARDENS 

Grand Central Palace, New York City 

30,000 DAILY VISITORS 

OP ENS JUNE 1 

Room for Highest Class 

CON CESS IONS 

Address WILLIAM ft. KEMBLE, Vice-President and Gen. Mgr. 



GALLARINI & SON 

Featuring the Boy Accordionist and Instrumentalist 

New Being Featured on the U. B. O. Time 
DIRECTION-ALF T. WILTON 



22 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



May 16, 1917 



JEAN ADAIR 



IN 



"Maggie Taylor— Waitress" 

Direction Lewi* cc Gordon 



EDDIE VINE 



In "A Study in Songs 



» 



Direction PAUL ALLEN 



RUTH and BOB 

THE CHRISTIES 

The Musical Act With a Punch 

JACK FLVNN. REPRESENTATIVE 



NOLAN and NOLAN 

JESTING JUGGLERS 

Direction NORMAN JEFFRIES 



SUPREME NEW OPERATIC OFFERING 

IVF DOREE'S CELEBRITIES 



Direction STOKER * BTERBAUER 



CAMILLE PERSONI 

THE "BUTTERFLY GIRL" OF VAUDEVILLE 



HARRY PEASE 

Nit i Question— Why Is he always working? Question — Who is his rtnrtsentative? 
• T* A. Answer — Because he's got THE material. Answer— NAT SOBEL. 



"The American 
Entertainer" 



ED. F. REYNARD Promts 
MUX 

Bl ANC A 

In a Series of Dramatic 
Dane* Poems. 



MI .I.E. BIANCA Prnau 
ED. F. 

REYNARD 

Th« VsotrUoqnU Comedian, 
m "BEFORE THE COURT." 



MAX HART PRESENTS 
THE 



VAL THE ERNIE 

STANTONS 



In "OH, BRAZIL" 



May 7, COLONIAL 



JACK 



NELLIE 



ORBEN and DIXIE 

In Southern Songs and Dances 

Playing Loew Circuit Address Care Clipper 




Direction HARRY WEBER 



FLYING MISSILE EXPERTS 
AND BOOMERANG THROWERS 

Booked Solid 

U. & O. — BIG TIME 



EDNA WINSTON TRIO 

NOW PLAYING U. B. O. TIME 

DIRECTION CHARLES BORNHAUPT 



DAINTY MARIE 

VENUS OF THE AIR 

Wishes to Be Known in Future Under Her Own Name 

(DAINTY) MARIE MEEKER 

DIRECTION PAT CASEY 



LEW SHARP 



RUBE GOLDIE 



5 MERRY YOUNGSTERS 

Fun — Fast and Furious 

HARRY GOODMAN JOHN GREEN MACK COLEMAN 

DIRECTION LEE MUCKENFUSS 



The Yaltos 



Dainty Dancing Duo 

DIRECTION GENE HUGHES. INC AND JO. PAIGE SMITH 



BUD WALKER 

Managers take notice: He's always on Broadway 

He looks like AJ. Jolson DIRECTION — JACK McGANN 



Olive Or 



The Kentucky Girl 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



ANDREW COPELAND 

America's Premier Colored Singing Comedian 

Address 121 W. 136th St., New York City IN VAUDEVILLE 



ROBERTS 



CLINTON 



WILLIAMS & TAYLOR 

Singing, Dancing and Talking 
IN VAUDEVILLE 



ORIGINAL 



COLONIAL TRIO 



MAUD KELLY 

Harpist 



Featurine; 

MARTIN KEARY 

Tenor 
DIRECTION JACK SHEA 



KATHRIN HULLING 

Soprano 



TANEAN BROS 



Week April 3*. Lowes, Baltimore; May 7, 8, t, Modjeaka, August*, Ga.; 
May It, 11, 12, G. O. H, Atlanta. Ga.; May 14, IS, If, Bijou, Binnlii»ham. 
Ala.; Mar ». IS. is, Lyceum. Memphis, fens.; Week 21, McVlckere, 
CBJcaco; Week 2s, Orphean, Detroit; Week Jan. 4, Miles, Oerebnsd, 



May 16, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



23 



FRIEND OF THEATRE FOLK DEAD 

Louisville, Ky., May 11. — Word has 
just reached here of the death of Mrs. 
Daisy Burton Hants, on April 5, at 
Decatur, Ind. Mrs. Hants was well known 
as a friend of professional people. A 
brother, living in this city, and a sister, 
survive. 



RIDER GOING TO COAST 

Hartford, Conn., May 11. — E. Dick 
Rider, manager of "The Sightseers," an- 
nounced here that he will take a four 
weeks' trip to the Pacific Coast June 1. 



JULIA NASH HAS NEW ACT 

A new act for vaudeville is being writ- 
ten for Julia Nash by Sam Ehrlich. It is 
called "A Night in June," and is a comedy 
turn. 



COLORED PLAYERS TO TOUR 

Mrs. Hapgood plans next season to take 
the Colored Players on a tour of the 
larger cities after the company ends its 
New York engagement. The repertory will 
include the plays by Ridgley Torrence, re- 
cently seen here. 



BREIL WRITING COMIC OPERA 

"The Legend" is the title of a light 
opera which Joseph Carl Breil, the com- 
poser, is writing for early production in 
San" Francisco. This will be the first full- 
length musical play from the pen of this 
composer. 



GEORGE NASH QUITS VAUDE. 

George Nash has left vaudeville to ap- 
pear in a new piny by Owen Davis. 



Ai.iv^ T ....«mmww. t mtum«w.'"v 



CHICAGO CABARET STARS 



ADA FORMAN 

In Her New Javanese Dance Creations Featured in 

"MARIGOLD FOLLIES" 

BISMARCK GARDENS HER RETURN ENGAGEMENT 

MARIE LA MAR & ESTELLE WARD 

$1,000,000 Worth or Red Hair 

Two Rag and Nut Sundaes at Frleberg's Hall— That's All 

MA DGE KEENER 

She Singeth Ballads to Multitudes and Hath a Host of Friends Who Liketh Her 

Unanimously! FRIEBERG'S HALL 



THE WORLD WONDER DANCERS 

Duplicating Their Chicago Success in Detroit 



TOlVf FAXON 

Of the "Old Guard," Soon Cavorts From Bismarck Gardens to Colosimo's Cafe, 
Where Ho Will Feung* as Usual. Tom Can't Go Wrong:. 

ZOE 1VORVALL 

INGENUE 

WITH WINTER GARDENETTES. CHICAGO 

OLIVE CHRISTIAN 

Chicago'. Cabaret Favorite Will Scintillate the Park Season in "Garden Follies" at 
White City's Terrace Garden. So Long — Friars Inn, Chicago 

MURIEL DEFOREST AND DOT LLOYD 

"WE'RE UP NEXT" 

Kicking Our Way Into the Audience at Friars Inn, Chicago 

IPPERSTEIN'S ORCHESTRA 

(Direction Harold Anderson, the Piano Wizard) 

With the Original Harmony Famous Dance Music 

In Their 16th Month at Friars Inn, Chicago 

WALLACE SCOTT X DOROTHY TIERNEY 

In "Drifting" — a Comedy Playlet by AGNES SCOTT Direction HARRY SPINGOLD 

FLORENCE STANLEY 

Late of La Salle Shows. Herself in "Winter Gardenettes," Chicago 



LILLIAN BROWN 

IN NOVEL SONGS AND DANCES THAT 

YOU LIKE 

CAFE DELUXE 

GEORGETTE 

DRESDEN DOLL OF THE CABARETS 
Congress Now, Chicago 

Lillian Rockley 

Australian Songstress 

At. Better Class Cafes ef Chicago 



Florence Clifford 

THE MUSICAL COMEDY GIRL 
DE LUXE CAFE. 

Lillian Bernard 

KANSAS CITY FAVORITE 

Congress Cafe, Chicago, Indrf . 

EVA LEUTHOLD 

Little Bon Bon a la Zephyr 
WINTER GARDEN 



FOUR JAZZ SONG HITS 



ORIGINAL SOUTHERN HIT 



BROWN SKI 



(\A/r-.. 



you -For) 



This is the song that created the Jazz sensation. Don't fail to get it if you 
hare a place for it in your act. By CLARENCE WILLIAMS and ARMAND 
J. PIRON. 



I CAN BEAT YOU DOING WHAT 
YOU'RE DOING TO ME 



A great novelty song with plenty of ginger and pep. Will knock them out 
of their seat.. By CLARENCE WILLIAMS and ARMAND J. PIRON. 



CALL ME SHINE 



Companion song to "Brown Skin." Just the thing for a blackface comedian 
or any comedy act. By ARMAND J. PIRON. 



YOU MISSED A GOOD WOMAN 
WHEN YOU PICKED ALL OVER ME 



Original blues song. Some blues. The gr eatest blues song ever written. 
By CLARENCE WILLIAMS. 



WILLIAMS & PIRON MUSIC PUB. CO. 

1315 Tulane Ave. New Orleans, La. 



JARION RYAN 



KATHRYN RAYMER 



ARION DUO 



The Singing Janitor 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



MAY 



RAE 



LARINE and CRAWFORD 

In Piano. Violin and Songs 

VAUDEVILLE 



LOEN A. BEREZNIAK 

Lawyer to the Frofsitisn 
Begs to notify bis many Mends that be bss 
mored his offices Id Chicago from 106 West Moo- 
roe Street to the First Nstlooil Emit Bonding. 
70 West Monroe Street, Suite U17 48-49, wbere 
he bu mneh enlarged facilities end will be 
plessed to tes Of hesr from bis friends. 

MAX ROGERS AGENCY 

Now at 1562 Broadway 
WANTS NOVELTY ACTS FOR 
CABARET 

Telephone 4239 Greeley 

FIRST CLASS HALL 
FOR REHEARSALS 

436 West 38th Street 

(Near 9th Ave.) 
Suitable for rehearsing productions of all 
kinds. Stage, piano, etc Terms R e a s ona b le. 



DON'T FORGET 

TO SEND FOR 

Billy E. Mills and Frank S. Butler's "fox 
trot craze" "SUGAR GAL," and the new 
"JASS BAND RAG." A tremendous hit in 
New York City. At BUTLER'S MUSIC 
PUB. CO. Address 122 West 115th St., New 
York City. Orchestrations also. 



VENTRIL0QUI5N 

Tanaht Almo+rt Anyone at Home. Small on*. Send 

•od»y 2-o*-f»t «tamp fr»«* i*W* ■ ««i I •» »■». and nroof. 

0. A SMITH, lass R543. 823 Blirirw St, Harts, ill. 



BIG HIT I GET IT I 

Hero of litem all 

"GO! MY SON, GOD BLESS YOU!" 

(Mother to Her Only Son) 
Keg. He, Prof. tc, Full Orch. ISc 

"Don't Say Anything" 
"Carry Me Back to Or Virginia Shore" 
"Won't You Wait Tan Years for Me?" 

Reg-. Copies ISc, Prof. 2c 

Crsatsst Poem Ever Written 

"WRECK OF THE S. S. TITANIC" 

IS Cents 

SOVEREIGN PUB. CO. 

1H Sycamore Buffalo. N. Y. 

Tel. 4754 Murray Hill Estab. 1889 

TO THE PROFESSION 

Your Furs stored and repaired during the sum- 
mer months. Many noted actor* are among 
our CU»tomer». 

O. STEINLAUF 

26 East 33rd St. NEW YORK 

(Between Madison and 5th Avenue) 

HOTEL BAGGAGE LABELS 

Attriet attention abeo tranUaf by hiring hot*! b*cf*f* 

libels of the lcKiirjE hotels on jour buiur. 

50 Assorted American hotel labels for $1.00 

75 Assorted American ud forv.cn for 2.00 

100 "Around Th* World" aasortment for 3.00 

Special aMortmcDt of leadlnc hotels of the larvest dtiei 

ind resorts of tbe U. 8. for |2.S0. Genuine labels, mads 

from the orlfliial electros as used by the hotel eonpaoies. 

Foreign labels an lmportfd. HOTEL UIEL MFG. CI.. 

tax 205. BiltfsMn, Mi. 



24 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



May 16, 1917 



Featuring Hawaiian String Quartet 

BIRLINGTON FOUR 



In «*Hokcmvlllc" 

PERSONAL DIRECTION ARTHUR KLEIN 




Aaaisted by FLOR D'ALIZA 
Presenting: Their Wonderful Rooster* 

Chms. Bornhaupt Keeps Them Crowing. 



JACK M. SYDNEY 

Versatile Entertainer Singing and Comedy 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



BILLY 



BETTY 



KIMBALL and KENNETH 

Novdly Banjo Entertainers. Originators of Hawaiian Steel Banjo, 

Playing Loew Time Direction Mark Levy 



HARRY 



DOROTHY 



FABER m TAYLOR 



In "GOING NORTH" 



U. B. O. 



W. V. M. A. 



ABSLAM SHARIFF 

THE LATEST MUSICAL REVIEWS 

20— PEOPLE— 20 

Send in open time per route. Direction MARK MONROE, Putnam Bids., N. Y. 



Vivian 



Lee 



Bert 



Lawrence. Daly and Lawrence 

COMEDY— SINGING AND DANCING ACT 

IN VAUDEVILLE ADDRESS— CLIPPER 



ANNA MAE COONEY 

AND 

DELLA COONEY 



ALWAYS WORKING 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



C H. HASKELL, Mgr. — IDA BUTLER — SAM GILLETTI HARMONY SINGING 

.hm. THE FIVE MARTELLS W 

WEEHAWKEN, P. 0„ N. J. 



ED 

AND 

IRENE 



LOWRY 



IN 



"Jests & Jigs 

BY TOMMY GRAY 



»» 



AGFNTS, LOOK US OVER 



BOSAN and 

Sons of Ham 



SINGING, DANCING. MUSIC 
AND COMEDY, IN VAUDEVILLE 



PAUL, LE VAN & DOBBS 



ACROBATIC COMEDIANS IN VAUDEVILLE 



THREE LADIES 



ONE MAN 



NOVELTY AERIAUSTS 



Direction MR. BORNHAUPT 



DANCING VIOLINIST 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



Beatrice McKenzie 

in a Singing Novelty Assisted by RAYE DUNN 

Direction FRANK EVANS 



EDDIE MARGIE BILLY 

DeLite.StewartpHardy 



20th Century Trio in Sons. Danes and Psitsr 



Rsp. Tom Jooss 



WILLIAM WAHLE 

Manager Olympic Theatre 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 



ADELAIDE CONLEY 

REFINED SINGING 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



EDDIE 



DOLLY 



DOLLY & LEWIIM 



IN A 
School, Fool and a Flirt 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



ELEANOR FISHER 



IN VAUDEVILLE 




BILLY NEWELL i ELSA MOST 



With MENLO MOORE 



W. V. M. A. 



U. B. O. 



SAM 



LAURA 

IS & WALKER 

A Leaton in Dancing — Norman Jefferies 



THE 



MARTIANS 



In "THE ASTRONOMER'S 
DREAM OF MARS.** 

Special Scenery. Everything Original. 



ALL GIRLS 



Darling Saxophone Four 



DIRECTION MARK LEVY 



RUSSELL, GREENE and JONES 

Singing — Acrobatic — Dancing 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



?D en-id OR 

IN "THE JUGGLER'S DREAM" 

BOOKED SOLID. SAM BAERWITZ, REP. 



May 16, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



25 




wfH-^y xs^yTcfflfci.^ 



In order to avoid nuatafcea and to man the 


prompt dilhrvy of 


in* l*tt«r» mdvanrtlaacl 


In thu list, a POSTAL CARD moat ba sent requesting urn 


to forwavra 


y (un- 


Utter. 


It n 


inat 


a* signed with yoor fall mam* and tha addraaa to which 


th» l«tt*r la 


to b« MBt. 


aad 


tha 


Its* o* business Mlarared by tha assidsr ahaald ba 


merjtisei 












Please mention tha data (or number) of tha 


CUPPER . - 


tfa« 


lvttw 


sent 


far 


vara advertlAad. 















Bo.ers. 0. Matt 
Bennett. J. May 
BcUiln. Oman 
Billings. J. 1- 

Bruee. J. a 
Berger, Ttrarlow 
BukU, Bussell 
Campbell. Leror 
Chile. Will 
Cblpmin, E. 
Orent, C 
Cipmin, Bury 
•-Sid, Wirt 



Omlii. Morrli 



Adams, Pansy 
Arnold, Lids 
Arnold, Florence 
Atkln. Florence 
Anderson. Maude 
BtaTord. Marcel 
Bennett, Vlctorlt 

Bergere. Eurtr 
Browning. Cath- 

erlne 
Brown, Manjlr 
Beechcy, E*a 
Belmont, Buster 



Donnelly. Leo 
Dixon, Bobby 
Dodte. B. B. 
Drjcrow, Dm 
Dixon, Bobby 
D.rii, a J. 
D'Art. Tex 
Elliott, Mix 

Ksmond, W. 
KUdni, Joe F. 
r'lrnum, Ted 

Friend, Jlmmie 
Ferns, Bob 

Forbes, Gut 
Prinklla, f*M 

K. 



Carlton. Kilty 

t'umithrrs, Mibel 
rourtney. Georgia 
Campbell. Mrs. 

Leroy 
Courtney, Georgia 
Cummlngi, Blllie 
Dobrrty. Mule 
lienlon, Trlxle 
Dsrley, Flo 
Puffin, Base 
Donnelly. Ktii 
Earle. Mn. 0. 



GENTLEMEN 

Farnum, Ted 
Gray, Julian 
Homer, Geo. M. 
Heddon. Bert a 
Hamlin, Hugo 
Home, Willie 
Hayis, Geo. F. 
Jacobs, SI. 
Kelly, Claud 
Keller, J. G. 
KUmt, Geo, 
Klirk. Harden 
Le Vin. Hlrry 
Uo. Frank 



Leslie, W. N. 
Ulhwood. H. B. 
Leonzo, Harry 

Me. 
Lawrence, Daly a 

Lawrence 
Leirltt, Abe 
Lewis. Fred's: 
Lace, E. H. 
Lieeio, W. A. 
Lee. J. H. 
HcPberaon. B. B. 

Mule. Vll B. 

Murphy. Eugene 



LADIES 

Edwudi, Nan 

Elliott. Flo 
Flack, Florence 

at 
Ferris. Bon 
Florence. Naomi 
Fsnnrortb, Blr- 

tlne 
Gordon, Mrs. K. 

W. 
Harper. Mabel 
Homes. Minnie 

G. 



Helm. Mrs. Phil 
Harris, Blanche 
Hills. Anns 
Judge, Cherry 
Kroner, Mrs. M. 
Lehanun. Brrnjee 
Lofu. Helen 
Moon, Midte 
Mantel], Goldle 
Morris. Kitty 
Moore. Pony 
Morgan. Boa* 
Morton. Clara 



Meyers, Al 
Mick, OlUe 
McAnillan. Joe 
Manner, Geo. M. 
Palmer, Lew 
Paul. Ora 
Pendelton. Pin] 
Peanoa. Arthur 
Pryor, Ernie 
Penney, a A. 
BelUy. Jes A. 

Riga. Ben 

Hldje. H. B. 
Bchntter. H. B. 
Strousj. Jack 
buiiiwn, Jes. J. 



Prerost. Flo 
Potts. Mn. W. 

W. 
Band. Mary 
Bay. Kalhcryn 
Hose. Vera 
Bow*. Madeline 
Richmond. Mrs. 

D. 
RwscU. Mn. C. 

W. 
Bene, Mn. 8. 



Serrano. Vincent 
Taylor A Coleman 
Tlmberf. Hanata 
Titos, Fred J. 
Thompson, E. F. 
WoUThelm. 
Eugene 
Werta, Clarence 

Wllkens, 8. 

Wallace, Bert 
Walter, Eddie 
Walte. Billy E. 
Westerman, W. 

8. 
Waldnn. J. U 

Wn ill, Edwin 



Stafford, Bess 
Scannell, Anna 

E. 
Sylva. Lanrette 
Talford. Birth 
Teller. Madeline 
W il train. Annie 
Weston. Ethel 
Wetaon, Margie 
Whitney. Eddie 
Wallace. Norma 
Weas. Mrs. G. E. 
Watson. Fanny 



CINCINNATI 

Cincinnati, May 14. — Baron Golden 
closed his season here ahead of Dave 
Marion's show. 

Manager Ned Hastings, of Keith's, al- 
though, in Cincinnati only one season, is 
becoming a regular lending citizen. He's 
been nominated for vice president of the 
Advertisers' Club. 

Charles Miller, of the executive offices 
of the Traction Company, has been made 
Business Manager of the Cincinnati Zoo. 
under the new management. The resort's 
policy will not be changed much this sea- 
nor, he says, high class bands and other 
musical attractions being the rule. 

It now seems probable that the new 
Palace Theatre, which Keith interests are 
to build on Sixth • street as a popular 
priced vaudeville house, will not be ready 
for next season. Difficulty of getting 
building material has held up the begin- 
ning of the work. 

Joe Doraey, well known Advance man, 
can't keep out of the show business. He's 
back at his newspaper work, hut is hand- 
ling the publicity of the Empress now 
and took a flier with Robinson's circus 
while the regular advance man was ill. 



DEATHS 



PETER H. GARDNER, of the original 
Gardner Bros.. German Comedians, has died 
In Bngl a n d. He was In the profession for 
forty years and made a name for himself 
both here and abroad. Ba made his blg- 

fest reputation with tha "Belle of New 
ork" company, -which played nucceanfully 
In London, and which opened Percy Will- 
lams' Colonial Theatre In New Tork. He 
died from an attack of bronchitis. Two 
brothers and a sister, Dan, Harry B. and 
Kathrlne, all living In New Tork City, sur- 
vive him. 

BERT LAFAYETTE, whose real name 
was James McRlnty, one of the Aerial La- 
fayettes, died In Chicago recently. He had 
been playing with his sister Agnes, now 
one of the Aerial Macks with the RlngllnB 
Bros." Circus. 

CAREY R. BAXLEY, well known In 
southern amusement clrclea, died In San 
Antonio, Tax., recently. His last venture 
was the management of the Cycle Park 
Theatre, Dallas, Tex. He leaves a brother, 
Jack, and a sister, Louise C. 



PLAYERS ENGAGED 



BOSTON 

Boston, May 14. — Two of the lead- 
ing show houses, the Colonial and Shu- 
bert Theatres, have closed for the season. 
The Dolly Sisters in "His Bridal Night" 
at Ye Wilbur. 'Tair and Warmer" at the 
Park Square, "The Masquerader" with 
Guy Bates Post, at the Plymouth and 
"The Tailor-Maid Man" at the Tremont 
will run as long as the box office barome- 
ter warrants. 

"Treasure Island," which came to the 
Hollia Street Theatre, May 7, is stgned up 
for two weeks with an additional option 
of two weeks. 

Ned McNaughton, stage door keeper of 
the Tremont, is strong for musical com- 
edy, not so keen on the "legit" and posi- 
tively against the film drama. "Mac" 
Bays there are no tips from the celluloid 
cast and as the Tremont has had its share 
of film productions this season the wave 
of American prosperity has not hit him. 

"RED ROBE" GETS BENNETT 

After Richard Bennett retires from the 
cast of "Bosom Friends," at the conclusion 
of its run in the Liberty Theatre, he will 
begin preparations to appear in "The Red 
Robe" i"t* Robe Rouge"), by Eugene 
Brieux. 



Eleanor Fox for "Her Soldier Boy." 

Tyler Brooke by Oliver Morosco for "So 
Long Letty." 

Walter Catlett by Florenz Ziegfeld for 
the "Follies." 



Raymond Van Sickle by Wm. H. Crane 
for "Mr. Lazarus." 



Mackay Morris by the Shuberts foi 
"The Eyes of Youth." 



Carl McCullough by Arthur Hammer- 
stein for "You're in Love." 



Robert Toms by William Curry foi 
"His Majesty Bunker Bean." 

Sam Ash by the Messrs. Shubert for 
a new musical play next season? 

Alice Baxter by Henry Miller for his 
San Francisco company in "Every- 
woman." 



Frank Weaterton and Edwin Stevens 
by Elliott, Comstock &. Gest for "Kitty 
Darlin*." 



Bianca Saroya by the Shuberts for a 
term of three yean for light opera pro- 
ductions. 



ELEANOR PAINTER TO STAR 

Eleanor Painter will star next season 
tinder the management of Oliver Morosco. 



Vira Amazar, George Baldwin and Bea- 
trice Allen by Florenz Ziegfeld for the 
"Ziegfeld Follies." 



Cohan & Harris 



TI1EATRE 

West 42d St 
Call Bryant 6344 
Eres. 8.20. Mats. Wed. At Sat. at 2.20. 



ti 



COHAK AND HAKBIS present 

THE WILLOW TREE 

A FANTASY Of JAPAN. 
By Banrifflo aad Haxriaoa Rhodes. 



»♦ 



8. I". KEITH'S 

PALACE 

Broadway * eTtb. St. 
Mat. Daily at 2 P. M. 

25. 50 and 75c. 
Every Night 
2S-SO-T3-S1.S1.50. 



EVA TANGTJAY. LOUISE 

DEXBSEK, EVAN BUB. 
HOWS FONTAINE, W. J. 
BXTXLY, U. 8. V., 
DOOXXT 4 BAiXS, BAIT. 

xoff a arni.TF, deb- 
ars A CLARK. ARKAUT 
BBOB., Herman « Shirley, 
Falao* Pictorial. 



sf^sTk'DTP West 48th St., Phone Bryant *0. 

LUif I Ev"- «* 8.20. Mats. Wed. A Sat. 

_ ." 2 - 20 - Ollrer Monaco's great 

laughing success. Season's One Substantial sneceaa 

UPSTAIRS I DOWN 

BT FREDEBIC AND FANNY HATTON 



MOROSCO 



GAIETY 



THEATRE. 45th St. West 
of Broadway. Era. 8:20. 
Mats. Wed. A Sat. 2:20. 
OLIYEK MOB0SO0 PRESEBTB 

THE BRAT 

By MAUDE FULTON 
"Better than '?•< 0' My Heart' " 

THEATRE. B'wsy * «0u> 
St. Urea, at S.SO. Mats. 
Wed. A Sat. at 2.20. 
WLMU HKI . T , SMITH and JOHN I_ GOLDEN 

Present the season's sneceas 

TIRNTOTHERIGHT 

DI7DITDI leP THEATRE. W. 42nd St. 
tlXjrlJDLlli E™ 010 *' •« 8 -'5 Matin.*. 
^"sssaaaass'^a Wednesday * Saturday 2.1S. 

aleaara. Shubert present 
a dramatisation of George da Menrier'a novel 

PETER IBBETSOBT 



with John Barrymore, Conatanc* Collier. 
Hope craws, Lionel Barrymore. 



Laora 



_H AVE J. YOU. ENLISTED IN THE ARMY 
of those who are singing this great song7 

FOR THE HONOR OF UNCLE SAM 

HAS A "DOLLY GRAY" PULL AND A 1917 PUNCH 

Come In and hear It — If you do you will uae It. 

If you use It— well, it'a a SURE-FIRE HIT. 

WHERE THE LIFFEY FLOWS INTO THE SEA 

One of the prettiest Irish ballads ever written 
ANOTHER PATRIOTI C ONE 

FOR DEFENCE 

Expressing the ssntlmsnts of those who love peace, 
but will fight when needed. 

Professional Copies and Orchestrations Ready. Drop In and See Us. 

COURTEOUS TREATMENT AND ATTENTION ALWAYS 

DILLON-PRAETOR, US MUSIC CO. 
1431 BROADWAY, NEW YORK CITY 



NOVELTY — VERSATILITY — ARTISTIC 



Billie 



Effie 



Potter i HartweO 



In their new act 



u 



I DON'T HAVE TO SHUT UP" 



"A FASHIONPLATE IN SONGLAND" 
MY MATERIAL "BOUGHT AND PAID FOR" 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



THE HENNINGS 

REFINED COMEDY NOVELTY OFFERING 

DIRECTION CHAS. F1TZPATRICK 





Telephone Greeley 2926 

YOU CAN RENT SCENERY 

For Try Outs, for Vaudeville Acta, 

Complete Productions 
We Supply Amateurs and Stock Com- 
panies with Everything 

WILLIAM H. FIANCE CO., Scenic SMloi 
sM-SM West »th St. New York 


MADISON'S BUDGET No. 16 

More popular than ever because better 
than ever. Contents Include 12 orig- 
inal monologues, 8 great sets for two 
males and T for male and female, a bright 
Irian set for tbree people, 20 sure-Ore paro- 
dies, 4 professions! minstrel first-parts, a 
screaming tabloid comedy: also hundreds of 
nlftr gags and fanny sidewalk bits, maim 
BON'S BUDGET No, IS costs ONE DOLLAR. 
JAHE8 KADISOH, 10U Third Arenas, He- 
York. 


BATHING-BOATING-FISHING 

At Great Kills ■eats roar rammer retreat. Beaattfal n- 

strlntd bungalow bnllilox ma. Low rrtes, easy urea, 

UUe coaraataed. Call. Write or Talephaua. 6BEAT KILLS 

BEACH COIPIUTIII. 15 Plrt In, I.T. Tel. Cnrt. 4205. 



26 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



May 16, 1917 



phiiip AUSTIN & BAILEY *-> 



IN "A SYNCOPATED HOTEL" 



DIRECTION PETE MACK 



MARY L.MAXFIELD 

Little Miss Personality 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



A HOLIDAY IN DIXIELAND 



JO- - - PEOPLE - - -lO 

WITH 



Will MASTIN and Virgie RICHARDS 

In . Cyclonic Bunt of Mirth. Melody and Dancin* 

Dilution HARRY A. SHEA 



The Boy Who Came Back 

ha • New Act by Allen Spencer Tenney 

ASK MY AGENT 



STONE & LE SOIR 

PRESENTINC 

12 ROYAL TROUBADOURS 

Singers and Instrumentalists 

Direction— LEE MUCKENFUSS 



IVIorK Levy Presents 

STANLEY and BURNS 

Two Jolly Bachelors Booked Solid 



AND 

IN "A VAUDEVILLE SURPRISE" 

BOOKED SOUP U. B. O. DIRECTION JACK MACANN 

Dan Dlx & Virgil 

WITH STAMPEDE RIDERS 



RUTH 

M 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



AND 



JOE 
Direction HARRY PINCUS 



BILLY GLASON 



Novelty "JUST SONGS" Cherec ter N. V. A. 



DIRECTION A, J. HORWITZ 



mm KENNY and LaFR ANCE ■» 

PREMIER DANCERS Direction TOM JONES 

— COLLINS & WEST— 

In * Comedy Skit, "TIi* Book Agent" Direction, WENONAH TENNEY 



THE GIRL FROM 
BRIGHTON 

ENCHANTRESS OF RAGTIME ALLEY. 



KITTY FLYNN 



BOOKED SOLD) 



ANNA MARIE 

DAINTY COMEDIENNE IN VAUDEVILLE 



FANNIE 



aninr. 



The World's greatest animal impersonator at your service, address 

care of Cupper 



WILLIE 



JAMES 



IN AMATEUR NIGHT 

DIRECTION PHIL BUSH BOOKED SOLID 



•TAKING CHANCES." 



Direction MARK LEVY 



ZITA LYONS 

"Venus of the Show World" 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



MYRTLE BOLAND 



Direction HARRY SHEA 



AND HER 

JAZZ 
BAND 



JAMES 



WILLIE 



MARSHALL & COVANT 

Singing, Dancing and Comedy 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



HELENE VINCENT 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



SKATING VENUSES 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



Direction HARRY WEBER 



IL. 

Upside Down Comedians 



DIRECTION WENONAH M. TENNEY 



FRANKIE FAY 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



O'BRIEN & KING 

(Formerly O'Brien & Egamsr) 

In THE NEW PIANO PLAYER 



henry LOWY & LACEY S,STERS 



ECCENTRICITIES IN SONGS AND DANCES 



JOSEPHINE LENHART 

The Diminutive Songster in vaudeville 

"EARYlt 

WHIRLWIND NOVELTY GYMNASTS 



Gertrude 

Singing and Dancing — Soubrette and Ingenue 



NEW TO THE EAST 



aritj 

In Vaudeville 




ragffiKE 



.. cs pbovr ^s^«jpj itisbebt. 
) ■aiUe.fernajieS. ' US W. «tt» St., 




DOLLY CONNOLLY 



May 16, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



26a 




DRAMATIC AND MUSICAL 

Route* Mutt Reach ThU Office Not Later 
Than Saturday 

Arlisg, Ueo. — Knickerbocker, New York, 14-19. 

Anglln, Margaret — Standard, New York, 14- 
10. 

Barries, J. M., Players (Cbas, Frohman, Inc., 
mgr.) — Empire, New York, indef. 

"Brat, The" (Oliver Moroeco, mgr.) — Moros- 
co, New York, 14. Indef. 

"Bosom Friends" (Lew Fields, mgr.) — Liber- 
ty, New York, 14-10. 

"Boomerang, Toe" (David Belasco, mgr.) — 
Powers', Chicago. 

"Beautiful Unknown, The" (The Shuberts, 
nigra.) — Boston, Indef. 

Collier, Wm. (H. H. Frazee, mgr.) — Long- 
acre, New York, Indef. 

Cowl, Jane (Selwyn & Co.,. mgrs.) — Harris, 
New York, 14, Indef. 

Clarke, Barry Corson and Margaret Dale 
Owen — Calcutta, India, indef. 

"Canary Cottage" (Oliver Morosco, mgr.) — 
New Haven, Conn., 14-19. 

"Cinderella Man, The" — Chicago, indef. 

Bltlnge, Julian — Blackstone, Chicago, 14-19. 

Faversham, Wm.— Princess, Chicago, 14-19. 

"Fair and Warmer" (Selwyn & Co., mgrs.) — 

Park So- Boston, indef. 
Gillette. Wm. (Arthur Hopkins, mgr.) — 

Booth, New York, indef. 
"Get Rich Quick Walllngford" — Cohan's, 

New York, indef. 
"Good Gracious Annabelle" — Cort, Chicago, 

Indef. 
Hajos, Mitel (Henry W. Savage, Inc., mgr.) 

—Erie. Pa.. 16 ; Elmlra, N. Y., 17 ; Ithaca. 

18; Blnebamton, . 10. 
"Her Boldier Boy" (The Shuberts. mgr.) — 

Sbnbert, New York, 14, indef. 
"Highwayman, The" (The Shuberts, mgr.) — 

Forty-fourth Street, New York, indef. 
"His Bridal Nlgbt," with Dolly Sisters (A. 

H. Woods, mgr.) — Wilbur, Boston, indef. 
"Human Soul, The" (J. H. Schwenk, mgr.) 

— Los Angeles, 14-19. 
"Johnny Get Your Gun" — Standard. New 

York. 21-26. 
"Knife, The" — Bijou, New York, Indef. 
"Love o' Mike" (Elizabeth Marbnry. mgr.) — 

Maxine Elliott's, New York, indef. 
"Man Who Came Back" (Wm. A. Brady, 

mgr.) — Playhouse, New York, indef. 
Nazlmova — Adelphl. Philadelphia, 14-10. 
Opera Couilijuu — Lyceum, New York, 14-19. 
"Oh, Boy" — Princess, New York, Indef. 
"Our Betters" (John D. Williams, mgr.) — 

Hudson, New York, Indef. 
Post, Guy Bates (Richard Walton Tulty, Inc., 

mgr.) — Plymouth. Boston, Indef. 
"Palo First" (J. Fred Zimmerman, mgr.) — 

Fulton, New York, Indef. 
"Passing Show Of 1917"— Winter Garden, 

New York, Indef. 
"Peter Ibbetson". (Lee Sbnbert, mgr.) — Re- 
public, New York, indef. 
Skinner, Otis (Chas. Frobman, Inc., mgrs.) 

— Ann Arbor, Mich., 16; Jackson, 17: 

Grand Rapids, 18-19; Akron, O., 21. 
"So Long Letty" (Oliver Morosco, mgr.) — 

Lyric. Philadelphia, indef. 
Taylor, Lanrette (Klaw * Erlanger & Geo. C. 

Tyler, mgrs.) — Globe, New York, indef. 
"The 13th Chair" — Forty-eighth Street, New 

York, Indef. 
"Turn to the Right" (Smith & Golden, mgrs.) 

— Gaiety, New York, indef. 
"Turn to the Right" (Smith oc Golden, mgrs.) 

— Grand, Chicago, Indef. 
Treasure Island" (Chas. Hopkins, mgr.) — 

nnllls, Boston, indef. 
"Tallor-Made Man" (Cohan & Harris, mgrs.) 

— Treznont, Boston, Indef. 
"Upstairs and Down" (Oliver Morosco. mgr.) 

—Cort, New York, indef. 
"Vorv Good Eddie" (Marbury, Comstock Co., 

miirs. ) — Chicago, indef. 
Washington Sq. Players — Comedy, New York. 

Indef. 
"Willow Tree. The" — Cohan A Harris, New 

York, Indef. 
"When Johnny Comes Marching Home (F. 

C. Whitney, mgr.) — New Amsterdam, New 

York, Indef. 
"Yon're In Love" (Arthur Hammersteln, 

msrr.) — t'nsino. New York. Indef. 

STOCK 

Academy Plovers — Haverhill, Mass., Indef. 

Auditorium Players — Maiden. Mass.. indef. 

Alcazar Players — San Francisco, indef. ■ 

Ancell Stock (Joe Angell, mgr.)— Park, Pitts- 
burgh, Indef. 

Baker Stock — Portland. Ore., Indef. 

Bryant. Marguerite. Players — Younest.wn. 
b . until June 2. 

Bleeker Players— Albany. N. Y., Indef. 

Bishop Players — Oakland, Cal., Indef. 

Bunting. Hmmn. Stock — San Antonio, Tex., 
Indef. 

Columbia Musical Stock — Oakland, Cal., In- 
def. 

Cornell-Price Players — Wauseon, O.. Indef. 

Cunningham Stock — Westminster Md., 14-19. 

Dale. Kathryn, Stock — Omaha. Neb., lndet 

Desmond, Mae, Co. (Ed. Cuddy, mgr.) — 
Schenectady, N. Y.. Indef. 

DuhlnBky Stock (Ed Dubinsky, mgr.) — St. 
Joseph, Mo., indef. 

Earl Stock (Larry Powera, mgr.) — Sharps- 
burg. Fa.. Indef. 

Emerson Plavers — LowelJ, Mass., Indef. 

Empire Players — Salem. Mass.. indef. 

Fifth Ave Stock (Jacques E. Horn, mgr.)— 
Fifth Ave., Brooklyn, indef. 

Fields. Marguerite. Players — White Plains, 
X. Y., indef. 




Gordlnier Bros., Stock — Ft- Dodge, la., indef. 
Hyperion Musical Players — New Haven, 

Conn., Indef. 
Home, Col. F. P., Stock — Akron, O., indef. 
.fowctt, Henry, Players — Copley. Boston, In- 
def. 
Keith's Hudson Theatre, Stock — Union Hill, 

N. J., indef. 
Keith Stock— Portland, Me., indef. 
Knickerbocker Stock (Carl Miller, mgr.) — 

Philadelphia, indef. 
Knickerbocker Players — Syracuse, N. Y., In- 
def. 
Lawrence, Del., Stock — San Francisco, indef. 
Lyric Theatre Stock — Bridgeport, Conn., in- 
def. 
Lonergan Players (E. V. Phelan, mgr.) — 

Lynn, Mass., Indef. 
Morosco Stock — Los Angeles, indef. 
McKlnley, Patti, Players— Zanesville, 0„ in- 
def. 
Manhattan Players — Rochester, N. Y., indef. 
New Strand Stock — Mobile, Ala., Indef. 
Norwood, Mande, Stock (Wm. J. Nelson. 

mgr.) — Oil City. Pa., Indef. 
Nesbltt Players — Wllkes-Barre, Pa., indef. 
Orpheum Players — Reading, Pa., Indef. 
Overholser Stock — Oklahoma City, Okla., in- 
def. 
Oliver, Otis, Players (Harry J. Wallace, 

mgr.) — La Fayette, Ind.. indef. 
Payton. Corse. Stock — Lexington, New York, 

Indef. 
Poll Stock — Scranton, Pa., Indef. 
Poll Players — Poll's Washington, indef. 
Poll Players — Worcester, Mass., Indef. 
Packard. Jay. Stock— Newark. N. J., Indef. 
Price, Stanley, Players — Grand Rapids, Mich., 

indef. 
PoBt. Jim, Stock— San Diego, Cal., indef. 
Plekert Stock — Columbia, Pa.. 14-19. 
Shubert Stock — Milwaukee, indef. 
Shubert Stock— St. Paul, indef. 
Somerville Theatre Players — Somervllie, 

Mass.. indef. 
St. Claire, Winifred, Stock (Earl Sipe, mgr.) 

■ — Trenton, N. J., Indef. 
St. Claire. Winifred, Stock — Paterson. N. J.. 

indef. 
Temple Stock — Ft. Wayne. Ind., indef. 
Toler. Svdney, Stock — Portland, Me., indef. 
Travers-Douglas Stock — Grand O. H., Brook- 
lyn, indef. 
Van Dvke & Eaton Stock (F. Mack, mgr.) — 

Joplin. Mo., indef. 
Vees, Albert. Stock — Wbeellng, W. Va.. indef. 
Wilkes Musical Stock— Vancouver, Can., in- 
def. 
Wadsworth Dram. Stock (Edward Ornstein, 

mgr.) — Toledo, O., indef. 
Wallace, Chester, Players — Butler, Pa., indef. 
Williams, Ed., Stock— Elkhart, Ind., indef. 
Williams, Ed., Stock — Qulncy, 111., indef. 
Woods, Lew, Stock — Syracuse, N. Y„ indef. 
Walker, Stuart, Players — Indianapolis, 14- 

Indef. 
Woodward, O. D., Players — Denver, indef. 

COMPANIES m TABLOID PLAYS 
Permanent and Traveling 

Clark, Billy. Comic Opera Co. — Sacramento, 

16-19; Reno, Nev., 20-22: Salt Lake City, 

24-26. 
Gramllck's, Chas., Follies of the Day — Moose 

Jaw. Can., Indef. 
Lord & Vernon M. C. Co. — Durant. Okla.. 14- 

19 
Reidway ft Burton M. C. Co.— Minot, N. D., 

indef. 
Shaffer's Boys and Girls — Okmulgee, Okie.. 

14-19: Henryetta, 21-26. 
Submarine Girls (Mersereau Bros., mgrs.) — 

F. Scott. Kan.. 14-19 : Iola. 21-26. 
Tabarln Girls — Ironton. O.. 14-19. 
Walker's Music Bugs (Ed. M. Moore, mgr.) — 

Massillon. 14-19: Alliance. 21-26. 
Harrow's American fJIrl Co. — Dixie, Union- 
town. Pa.. 14-19. 
Zarrow's Little Bluebird Co. (Jack Funuay, 

mgr.} — McKeesport. Pa.. 14-19. 
Znrrow's Varletv Review (D. J. Lynch, mgr.) 

— Pnrkershurg. W. Va„ 14-19. 

BURLESQUE 
Columbia Circuit 

Bowerv Burlesquers— Empire. Newark, 14-19; 
Empire, Brooklvn, 21-26 : Casino, Brooklyn. 
28-.Tune 2. 

Hastings' Big Show — Columbia. Chicago. 14- 
19: Gaiety. Detroit. 21-26; Empire, Brook- 
lyn, 28-June 2 ; Casino, Brooklyn. 4-9 : 
Columbia, Chicago, in, indef. 

Hip, Hip. Hooray Girls — Columbia. New 
York, 21-Indef. 

Irwin's Bis Show — Gaiety, Buffalo. 14-19. 

Irwin's Majesties — Star. Cleveland, 14-19; 
Gaiety, Buffalo. 21-26. 

Llbertv Girls — Washington. 14-19: Pitts- 
burgh. 21 ; Cleveland. 28. Indef. 

Maids of America — Columbia. New York, 14- 
19 ; Casino, Brooklyn, 21-26 : Empire, 
Newark, 28-June 2. 

Bag Doll in Ragland — Casino. Brooklyn, 14- 
19 : Hnrtig * Seamon's, New York, 21-26. 

Spiegel's Revue — Hurtig A Seamon's, New 
York. 14-19. 

Some Show — Star A Garter. Chicago, 14-19. 

Sightseers — Newburgh and Pouehkeepsle, 14- 
19 

Sldm'an, Sam, Sbow — Casino, Boston, 14-19. 

Billy (Sliding) Watson Show — Empire, 
Brookivn. 14-19 : Empire, Newark, 21-26. 

Watson, 'Beef Trust — Gaiety, Pittsburgh, 14- 
19: Cleveland. 21-26: Detroit, 28-June 2. 

Williams, MoUle — Gaiety, Detroit, 14-19 ; 
Gaiety Buffalo. 28-June 2: Empire, Brook- 
lyn. 4-9: Casino. Brooklyn. 11-16. 
(Continued on page 34.) 



Wanted for Bowdish Big Stock Co. 

OPENING UNDER CANVAS 

Two Gen. Bus. Men. also man (or juvenile and Al comedian, alio character woman, those 
aoabling band and doing specialties preferred. Violinist, tuba, trombone and Al trap drummer. 
boozers and disturbance makers closed without notice. Those requiring tickets most give Al 
security. Rehearsals open 21, show opens May 28th. Notice, state your lowest at we pay all- 
Address BOWDISH BIG STOCK CO., Brookvilla, Pa. 

WANTED QUICK— STOCK PEOPLE 

FOR CANVASS THEATRE CO. 



PeopU in All Line,. Piano Player. Child for parts. State all first letter. Name lowest. Fay 
own. Week stands. Booiers, chasers and trouble makers not tolerated. Will advance fares to 
people wc know. Mention correct age, weight, height. Enclose program* and photo; will be 
returned. If you do specialties mention them. Address MANAGER CANVASS THEATRE CO, 
Woodsville, N. H. 

IVY and IVY Smoking Stove 

IN VAUDEVILLE 

Gertie Eradne DelVlllt 

THE GIRL WITH THE SMILE 
IN VAUDEVILLE 

JOHNNIE WEBER 



Esagsured for next 



by Jack Stngar ana Lew Talbot with 



"LID LIFTERS" 

THANKS TO MANAGERS FOR MANY KIND OFFERS 

CAD CAI C 9-foot Giants for Parades, Uncle Sam, Liberty, Policeman, Maggie Morphy, 
sr*s»s% «»»»■»» Topsy, etc. Prop Giraffe, Elephant, Donkey, Lion, Booster. G—i«e, etc. 
Grotesque and Animal Heads. Props of all kinds and Papier Macbe made to order. E. walker, 
309 W. 39th St, New York. No catalogues. I make what yon want. 

COLT OH DRAMATIC CO. 

No. 1 SHOW 

WANTS leading Man, Heavy Man, Specialty Comedian, prefer one with »ins;iiig voice, for quar- 
tette; lead and heavy 1 and 2 bass comedian, I or 2 tenor. A-I pianist, and drummer with fall line 
traps, bells, etc, both double stage, 2 bills. All must be A-l experienced people. State age, 
salary, etc Week stand tent. CHAS. E_ COLTON. 1117 Prospect St_ i~ii.-. r rfi. - lad. 



\A/ 



IN 



MAN and WOMAN. Play anything cast for; specialties given preference. 
Quick. Everything, first letter. Photos. 

GUY PLAYERS, Linton, Ind. 



Buhla Pearl 



Inuring tn rro draft 



A fSarlirn swpof an any Sill 



fitrrrtton Mark Crtrg 



CHARLES 



JORDAN 

AM I ? ess ssa. 



TENNEY 



lika the Pircel Post "delivers the goods." Acts, skstohea, sad msnolsgmas, written 
right. They're 'all of originality, "pop" and "rst-ovar." Don't wish far a OOOB 
act. hays Taansy writs yon on.. Gorreapoadanoo solicited. 

ssssssssssssssssssssssS A T . T . r y SPEHCER TZSTBTZ, No. list Broadway, Irs York City. 

1VEW HOTEL WARNER 

(EUROPEAN) 

Cottage Grove Avenue and 33rd Street, Chicago f '. 

Telephone Douglas 073 
F. BURT CARR, President and Managar 
(formerly with Victoria, Wellington and Morrison Hotels) 

THEATRICAL PATRONAGE DESIRED 



2SO Outside Booms, 
Weakly and Psraau 



200 Private Bath.. Rooms with Private Bstb. $1.00 per dsj aad upwards 
ant Ratss. FlBEPROOr. EXCELLENT CAfB. POPULAR PRICES. 



AX 


NAMLOH and NEB 


Ja HL 


In a Scenic Production 


jheii 


"A WYVERN'S DEN" 


Msm> 


In Vaudeville 



We Invile ill Sinjinr Mtmbcrs ol Iht Thtilncil Prolcssion to Eumme in Anorlrcen! ol 

GREAT NEW UNPUBLISHED SONG NUMBERS 



V •■•■„£,,.:.:; KNICKERBOCKER HARMONYSTUDIOS' ;._".-r :-r. 



26b 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



May 16, 1917 



GRIPPING THE WORLD! 

The World Is In Its Grip! Never Be- 
fore Has Any Song So Taken 
The Entire Country By 
Storm. This Great Song 
Stands As The 
"One Big" 
War Song 
Hit 




IT GOES OVER BIG 

A Sobs With A Poach -A 
Punch In Every line of the 
Lyric la Every Bar 
of the Marie 



Like a cyclone is this great song sweeping the 

country. It >is proving one of the biggest successes in 

years. A rousing spirited march melody, three ■ measures 

of it- "gets the house" and will have them stamping their feel 

to its swinging rhythm. 

GREATEST SONG SINCE THE 
"STAR SPANGLED BANNER" 



TRY IT IN YOUR ACT 



IT WILL STOP THE SHOW 



Write for OAM PHY PUR Pft CLEVELAND 

Professional Copy to ^MJwl r VMV I~WID \*r\J. O., U. S. A. 



1DUHE 




LATE OP THE GREAT NEW YORK SUCCESS 

"THE BLUE PARADISE" 

Direction ML S. Bent ham Colonial Theatre Week May 21st 



After a Successful Season in the West 
Frank Evans Announces the Return of 

BERT FITZGIBBON 



Commander- 



of the Army of Nuts 



At B. F. Keith's Royal Theatre This Week, May 14 



May 16, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



27 



HEW YORK CITY. 

Palaoe— Joe Sutler — Henry Lewi* — Ben Welch — 
Bostock'* Biding Act — Stan Stanley — Irish Colleens 
— Bogar* Russian Berne. (Two to Ml.) 

Colonial — Wm. Slato — Nellie Allen— Am eta— Jen 
cY Marlln — Bicker Bros, — Ealntr es Brown. 

Boyal — Scotch Lade A Laaalea — Imhoff, Conn A 
Coreene — Raymond 4 Oaverly — Ben Welch — Alex. 
MacFadden— Vine & Temple— Verd ft Vetcl— Mc- 
Kay ft Ardlne. 

AlhaJrabra— Marie ft Willie Cutty— Sophie Tacker 
Co. — Jan. J. Corbett — Pete ft Pale— George Brows 
— Jon. Browning — Jewell'* Manikin* — Williams ft 
Wolfns. 

Bivenide — Gene Green ft Co. — Page, Back ft 
Mack- Dorothy ' Toye — Llghtner ft Alexander. 
BEOOELYlf. 

Buahwiok — Laurie ft Brosum — Nelaon Waring — 
Herman ft Shirley — Nlghtons — Mlgnon — Dooley ft 
Sale* — Van & Schenck. 

Orphenm — Bernard ft Janls — Corner Store — Tra- 
Tilla Bros, ft Seal — Al Herman — Emma Steven* — 
Frank Crumlt — Arnant Bros. — Howard ft Clark Re- 
view — Merle'* Cockatoos. 

ATLANTA, OA. 

Forsyth— Hale ft Patterson— Rockwell ft -Wood 

— Maryland Singers. 

BOSTON, MASS. 
Keith'*— j. ft b. Morgan — Apdale'i Animals — 
Loney Haskell— WIU Ward ft Olrls— Seltna Braats 
— Adele Rowland — "Race of Man" — Moran ft . 
Wiser — Paul Dickey ft Co. 

UOTTALO, N. T. 

Shea's — "Forest Fires" — Stephen D. O'Bonrke 4 
Co. — Brennan ft Powell — Al ft Fannie Steadman — 
Ball ft Bra— Rice ft Werner. 

BIRMINGHAM, ar.a 

Lyrio (Flrat Half)— Bans Hanke— Malda of 
Honolulu— Clark & Verdi. (Last Half)— Maryland 

SlfJKpr* — Rockwell & Wood. 

OOLTSMBUS, OHIO. 
Keith 1 *— Brlrt Wood— Fern ft Darls— Ouerln ft 
NewelL 

DETROIT, MICH. 

Temple — Ponilllo Sisters — Llbonatl — Four Lokens 
— Cuss. T. Aldrlco — Bennett ft Bleharda — Motor 
Boating — Valentine ft Bell. 

EBXB, PA. 
Colonial — Bert Bakar ft Co. — Emilia Slaters — De- 
Forrest ft Kearoa— J. ft M. Burke. 

GRAND, HAPIDS, MICH. 

Empress — Rena Fatker— Montgomery ft Perry — 
Mario & Dnffy — Raymond ft O'Connor. 

HAMILTON, CAM. 
Temple— Nelson ft Nelson— "Candidates." 

NASHVILLE, TENN. 
Prlnoeea (First Half)— Bert Johnson ft Co. 
(Last Hair)— liana Hanke — Maids of Honolulu— 
Clark ft Verdi. 

riTTHBTJRQU. PA. 

Daria— The Pucka— The Duttona— Dorothy Jar- 
don — Nip ft Tuck— Bert Bwor — Sllber ft North. 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Kalth'a — The Sharrocka — Dunbar's Darkle* — 
Warren ft Conley — Three Bird* — Dnrkln Girl* — 
"Night Boat"— Carlisle ft Roma — Florence Moore 
A Brother — Marck'i Lions. 

TOLEDO, OHIO. 

Keith'*— Four Dannhe* — Robt. T. Halnea ft Co. 
— Kitner, Hawksley ft McKay. 

TORONTO, CAM. 
Shaa/a — Walter Brower — 1'ileer ft Dougla* — 
Yvette — Cooper ft Rlcardo — DeBar*. 
WASHINGTON, D. 0. 
Kalth's— Bride Shop— Wilfrid Clark ft Co.— 
Hull ft Dnrkln — Regal ft Bender— Jean Moore — 
Mr, ft Mrs. Jlmmle Barry — Harry Carroll— The 
Gladiator*. 

YOUNQBTOWN, OHIO. 

Kalth'a — Australian Crelgbtons — Nina Payne ft 
Co. — David Saperateln — Wm. Gaxton ft Co. — BlUia 
Reevra & Co. — Erna Antonio Trio — Rac Samuels. 

ORPHEUM CIRCUIT 

CHICAGO, ILL. 
Majestlo — Gertrude Hoffmann — Tempest ft Sun 
•nine — "Bubcvllla" — Spencer ft Williams — Nord- 
strom ft Plnkham—Caltes Bros. — Cycling Bru- 
nettes. 

DENVER, COLO. 
Orphenm — The Canalnoa — Nonette — Seven Honey 
Hoys — La Graciosa — Togan ft Geneva — Una Clay- 
Ion ft Co. — Ashley ft Allman. • 

LOS ANQELE8, CAL. 

Orphenm — Cecil Cunningham — Wright ft Diet- 
rich — The Berrens — Chung Hwa Four — Ethel Mc- 

Donongh — Our Family — Barry * Girls — Hermlne 

Shone & Co. 

LOUISVILLE, Kx*. 

Fontaine Ferry Park — Bowman Bros. — Grabs ft 
King Co. — Dore ft Vernon — Bertie Ford — Boeder ft 

Dean. 

MILWAUKEE, WIS, 

Orphenm— Nat Wills — Bert Leslie ft Co. — 
Haruko Onukl— Rlggs ft Wltchle— H. ft A. Sey- 
mour — Garcinetti Bros. — Clara Howard — The 
Kramers. 

PORTLAND, ORE. 
Orphenm — Hay Cox — Boyle ft Brown — Dorothy 
Shoemaker & Co.— De Leon ft Davles— Frank ft 
■Toby — Leach Wallen Trio— Dorothy Brenner. 

ST. LOTUS, MO. 
Forest Pk. Highlands — Big City Four— Merlan'a 
;Dogs — Susan Tompkins — GaUando. 

Orphenm — Alexander Carr ft Co. — Nellie Nichols 
— Tboa. Swift ft Co. — Kerr ft Berko— The Nor- 
iveUes— Tracey ft McBride— Witt ft Winter. 
8AN FRANCISCO. CAT,. 
Orphenm — Bath St. Denis ft Co. — Marion Harris 
-— Mlllleent Mower— King ft King— Lewis ft Nor- 
-ton— Helen Plngree ft Co. — Ben Deely ft Co. — 
<Le Roy Talma ft Bosco. 

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH. 
Orphenm — Bis ft French — Bdwln Arden ft Oo. — 
Marmeln Slaters — "The Recital" — "Motoring" — 
fBert Kenny — Gould ft Lewla. 



W®&BEWLMM MEL, 




LOEW CIRCUIT 

NEW TORS CITY. 

American (Flrat Half)— Frank Ward— Maby ft 
Woods — Nolan & Nolan — Spiegel ft Jones — 
Fatlma— Belle Rutland— Jo*. Remington ft Co. — 
Hilton ft Lazar — Five Pandoras. (Laat Half) — 
Marshall ft Covent— Senator Marphy— Fatlma— 
Mohr ft MohTatt — Rich Girl-Poor Girl— Manning 
Sisters. 

Boulevard (First Half)— Dellte, Stewart ft Har- 
vey — Walton ft Delberg — "The Alibi" — Bernard 
ft Lloyd — Three Roiellas. (Last Half) — The Van 
Camps — Orben ft Dixie — Howard ft Sadler — "The 
Fixer" — Brady ft Mahoney. 

Avenue B. (First Half) — Hanley, Luni ft Smith. 
(Last Half)— Lew Welch ft Co.— Hudler, Stein 
ft Phillip*. 

Greeley Square (First Half)— Nat ft Flo Albert 
— BIcknell— Beth Mayo — Jeok* ft Allen— Blch 
Girl-Poor Girl— Fern, Richelieu & Fem. (Last 
Half) — Gypsy Songsters— Frank Ward— Miller ft 
Mitchell — Payne ft Neablt— LaCoota ft Clifton — 
Fox ft Cross. 

Delaney Street (First Half)— Valdos— Howard 
ft Sadler — Payne ft Nesblt— The Fixer— Bert 
Howard — Geo. Davis Family. (Last Half) — Jack 
OnrI— Nat ft Flo Albert— Ham Tree Mule— Helen 
Vincent — Lewis, Belmont ft Lewis. 

Lincoln Square (Flrat Half) — Marshall ft Covabt 
— Sally Seeley — Montrose ft Allen — John R. 
Gordon ft Co. — Lewis. Belmont ft Lewis— Del- 
Grado Four. (Last Half)— Ferdinand— Maby ft 
Woods— Bert Howard— Ballard Trio— Hilton ft 
Laxar— Sabbott & Wright. 

National (First Half) — Ham Tree Mule — Miller 
it Mitchell— Cbas. Bice ft Co.— Burn* ft Kluen— 
Sabbott ft Wright. (Last Half)— Davis ft Walker 
■ — Montrose ft Allen — Mr. ft Mrs. Fred Thomas — 
Three Roiellas — DelGardo Four. 

Orphenm (First Half) — Stewart ft Keeley— 
Theodore Trio — Scbwarts ft Clifford— "The 
Triangle"— Mumford & Thompson— Ballard Trio. 
Last Half)— Bert ft Vera Morrlseey— Barton ft 
Hill — Nolan ft Nolan — Plottl — John B. Gordon ft 
Co. — Fenton ft Green. 

Seventh Avenue (First Half) — Van Camp* — 
Plottl — Sampson ft Douplaa — "Shot at Sunrise" — 
Brady ft Mahoney— Fred La Relne ft Co. (last 
Half) — Belle Rutland— "The Triangle"— Mumford 
ft Thompson — Geo. Dsvls Family. 
BROOKLYN, N. T. 

BUou (First Halfl— Jack OnrI— Orben ft Dixie— 
Mohr ft Mnffatt — Cha*. Deland & Co. — Jim Me- 
Wllllams— Chlo ft Chlo. (Last Half)— Stevens ft 
Falk — Spiegel ft Jonea — Sampson ft ■ Dougla* — 
Chss. Bice * Co. — Bnrn* ft Klasen — Fire ramlii'ss. 

DeXalb (First Half)— Ferdinand — Barton ft Hill 
— Manning Slaters — Mr. ft Mrs. Fred Thorns* — 
Senator Marphy. (Last Half)— BIcknell— Stewart 
ft Keeley — Ward ft Cullen — Joseph Remington ft 
Co.— Chlo ft Chlo. 

Warwick (First Half)— Josephine Davis — Lew 
Welch ft Co.— Wheeler ft Mickey. (Last Half)— 
Hurh Bros. 

Fulton (Flrat Half) — Hemmlngs — Davla ft 
Walker — Gypsy Songsters — Fox ft Cross — Sey- 
mour's Happy Family. (Last Half) — Dancing 
Demons— Sallv Seeley— Fred LaRelne ft Co. — "The 
Alibi" — Jim McWIlllaros. 

Palace (Flrat Half)— Sam Harris— Hudler. Stein 
A Phillips. (Last Half)— BasebaU Four— Joseph- 
ine Darls — Blgoletto Bro*. 

BALTIMORE. MD. 

Hippodrome — DelBadle ft Jap — Cooney Sister* — 
Davit ft Duval — Brown, Harris ft Fern — Smith ft 
Farnum — Randow Trio. 

BOSTON. MASS. 

Orphenm (First Half) — Gaston Palmer— Ward ft 
Shubert — Chisholm ft Breen — Burns & Lynn — 
Marie ft Billy Hart. (Last Half)— Sylpbonoe— 
Mabel Beat — Van ft Carrie Avery — Bayno ft 
Hoyt— "Garden of Mirth." 

8t. James (First Half) — Kenney ft LaFrance — 
Barnes ft Robinson — "Man In the Dark" — "Gar- 
den of Mirth." (Laat Half)— Duval ft Simons— 
Roatlno ft Shelley — Bush & Shapiro. 
FALL BTVER, MASS. 

Bijou (Flrat Half) — Sylpbono* — Duvsl ft Simons 
— Van ft Carrie Avery — Bush ft Shapiro. (Last 
Half) — Kenney ft LaFrance — Ward ft Shubert— 
Chisholm ft Breen— Marie ft Billy Hart. 
HARTFORD. CONN. 

Hartford (First Half) — Stanley ft Burns— Mabel 
Best — Wilson, Franklin ft Co. — Bayno ft Hoyt — 
Boralnl Troupe. (Last Half) — McDermott ft Wal- 
lace — Mercedes Clark ft Co. — Julian Bose. 
NEWARK. N. J. 

Majestle (First Half)— Bert ft Vera Morrlsaey 
— Helen Vincent— LaCosta ft Clifton — Fenton ft 
Green — Buch Bros. (Last Half) — Hemmlngs— 
Dellte, Stewart ft Harvey — Schwa rts ft Clifford — 
"Shot at Sunrise" — Wheeler ft Mickey — Lelanda. 
PROVIDENCE, B. I. 

Majestlo (Ftrat Half)— Roatlno ft Shelley — 
Julian Rose— Klukald Kilties. (Last Half)— 
Gaston ft Palmer — Burns ft Lynn- -"Man In the 
Dark"— Klnkald Kilties. 

TORONTO, CAN. 

Tonga Street — Gliding O'Mearas — Billy & Ada 
White — Bemivlcl Bros.— Dave Klndler — Harold 
Selman ft Co. — Bath Roye — Long Tack Sam Co. 

POU CIRCUIT 

BRIDGEPORT. CONN. 

Poll (First Half) — Four Southern Girls — Brooks 
ft Oakley— Burke ft Burke — Kane ft Herman — 
Cabaret De Luxe. (Laat Half) — Rive* ft Harri- 
son — Oliver ft Olp — Bave Roth — "Broadway 
Revue." 

HARTFORD, CONN. 

Palace (Flrat Half) — Primrose Fotrr. (Laat 
Half) — Foot Southern Girls — "The Punch" — 
"Darn Good ft Funny." 



Poll (First Half)— The Pelots—Mack ft 
Ruth Cuttls— Fadette Orchestra. (Last Half)— 
Arthur Lloyd— Emmie ft Effle Elliott— Wllklna ft 

Wilklns — George Damerel ft Co. 

Bijou (First Half)— Arthur Lloyd— RIvea ft 
Harrison — Four Comedy Phlends — Dave Rotb — 
"Broadway Revue." (Last Half) — BIcknell— 
Larry ft Sally Clifford — Norton Girls— Kane ft 
tier man — Odiva ft Seals. 

8CRANT0N, PA. 

Poll (First Half)— Sheets ft Eldrid— Lazar ft 
Dale — "At the Party." (Last Half)— Musical 
Christies— Levitt ft Lockwood — Seven Bracks. 

WATEB.BUHY, CONN. 

Poll (Flrat Half)— "Darn Good ft Funny" — 
Oliver ft Olp— Gallagher ft Martin — George 
Damerel ft Co. (last Half)— Sylvia Loyal- 
Senna ft Webber — Primrose Four — Cabaret De 
Luxe. 

WTLKES-BARKE, PA. 

Poll (Ftrat Half) — Musical Christies— Levitt ft 
Lockwood— Seven Bracks. (Last Half)— Sheet* ft 
Eldrid— Lazar ft Dale— "At the Party." 

WORCESTER. MASS. 

Poll (First Half) — Harry Tyler — Norton Girls — 
Wilklns ft Wilklns— Odlva ft Seals. (Last Half) 
—Burke ft Burke— Gallagher ft Martin— Fadette 
Orchestra. 

Plats (First Half)— "The Punch"— Emmie ft 
Effle Elliott— Sylvia Loyal. (Last Half)— The 
Pelots— Ruth Curtis— Msck ft Lee. 

W. V. M. A. 

ALTON, ILL. 
Hippodrome (Flrat Half)— Bootbhy ft Bverdean 
— Myrl ft Delmar. (Last Half)— Hoyt's Minstrels. 

CHICAQO, TT.T, 

Eedxie (First Half)— TransOeld Slaters— Silver 
ft Duval— Baall ft Allen— rlerbert Germalne Trio. ' 
(Laat Half) — Novelty Clintons— Harry Beresrord 
ft Co.— Olive Briscoe — Emerson ft Baldwin. 

Academy (Flrat naif)— Harry Dixon — Morgan. 
Fields ft Snyder. (Laat Half)— Arnold ft Paige. 

Windsor (Flrat Half)— The Clinton*— Jame* 
Howard — Harry Bcresford ft Co. — Emerson ft 
Baldwin. (Laat Half)— Harts ft Evans— Mason 
ft Murray — Morgan * Gray— Morrla ft Campbell- 
Herbert Germalne Trio. 

Avenue (First Half)— "Maid to Order. (Laat 
Half)— Island Fonr— Duffy ft Dunn — Allan IJebler 
ft Co. — Oscar Lorraine ft Co.— Frank Hartley. 

Wilson (Flrat Half)— Mason ft Murray— Glbba, 
Gardner Trio — Moore, Gardner ft Rose — Frank 
Hartley. (last Half)— Transfleld Slaters — Zeno 

ft Mandel— Kargan ft Shyman— Marie Stoddard 

Cal. Orange Packers. 

DULUTII, MINN. 
Grand (Flrat Half )— Taylor . Triplet* -Iretta 
Emily Darren ft Co. — Royal Toklo Troupe. (Laat 
Half)— Hopkins ft Axtell— Floyd Mack ft May- 
belle — Fonr Hards. • 

EAST 8T. LOUIS. ILL. 
Erber-s (First Halt)— Mildred Hayward— Force 
ft Williams— Hoyt's Minstrels. (Laat Half) — 
Five Sweethearts— Chss. Sweet— Klutlng's Ani- 
mals. 

FOND DU LAO, WIS. 
Idsa (Flrat Half)— The.- Lamplnla. (Laat Half) 
—Harry Watklns— Harrfa ft Nolsn. 

FT. WILLIAM, CAN. 
Orphatun (First Half)— A bolt ft Burton— Rod- 
way ft Edward*— Bijou Minstrel Mlsae*. 

GRAND FORKS, N. D. 

Grand (Laat Half)— Gene Weat— Dnmals ft 
Floyd — Raskins Russians. 

LINCOLN, NEB. 

Orphenm (First Half)— Akl Troupe— Thorndlke 
& Barnes— Mr. ft Mrs, Norman Phillip*— Grant 
Gardner — The Casting Lamrs. (Last Half) — 
Orton Troupe— May ft Kllduff— Dae ft Neville — 
Hlrahell Hendler — Winter Garden Bevue. 

Lyrio (First Half)— Falrman ft Patrick— 
Radium Model*. (Laat Half)— Byal ft Early- 
Three Lyres. 

MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 

Palace— Odonne — Freeman, Dunham & Co. — 
Lewla ft Leopold — Zeno, Jordan ft Zeno. 

OAKLAND, CAL. 

Hippodrome (First Half)— Anita Arils*— La 
Vere ft Palmer— Kubllck — Catherine Chaloner ft 
Co.— The 8katellea— Ward. Bell ft Ward. (Laat 
Half) — Le Doux ft Le Douz — Jermon ft Mack- 
Brown. Carstens ft Wuerl— Fonr Slickers — Tom 
Murphy— Oden ft Holland. 

OMAHA, NEB. 

Empress (First Half)— Conway ft Day — Dae ft 
Neville— Byal & Early— Three Lyrea. (Last 
Half)— Flske ft Fallon — Mr. ft Mrs. Norman 
Phillips — Falrman ft Patrick — Badlum Models. 
OSHKOSH. WIS. 
Majestlo (Flrat Half)— Harry Watklns. (Laat 
Halfl— Grandstaff ft Davis — Russell ft Bell — The 
Lamplnls. 

PORTLAND, ORE. 

Hippodrome (First Half) — Superb* — Mansfield 
ft Riddle— Johnson ft Rolllson — Msalrnff'a Gypsies 
—Lew FltxgibboD— Three Ankers. (Laat Half) — 
Moran Slaters — Cowles ft Dustin — Rotbrock ft Mc- 
Grade — Dougla* Flint ft Co. — Paul Poole — Four 
Charles. 



nVPNATICT Experienced. Will Assist Hyp- 

nirnviiai n oti*t. write PRor. pacxwa, 

2110 W. 47th St, Chicago, 111.. 

WANTED— QUICK 

Musicians for Band and Orchestra. Comets, 
Trombones, Baritone, Tuba, Violin and Piano to 
double Band. Specialty People who play brass. 
Three-day stand. Tent show. I pay all after 
Joining. State Salarv if ,vou want an answer. Must 
Join on wire. CHAB. E. WHAPLES. 41 Henry 
St., New Haven, Conn, 

Summer Theatre for Sale 

located at one of the most popular recreation 
resorts in N. E. 100,000 population to draw 
irom. 

J. W. GORMAN 

100 Boylston Sl. Boston, Mass. 

Theatre For Rent 

Stock, Viud«T.Ue. PJctuxr*— dtj 30.000—Qoo.i 
Summer town. Would con*Mer partner under 
Htandlng bunlnens end. Addreu "THEATRE,* ■ 
care of CLIPPER. 

Complete Tent Outfit For Sale 

Used Four Months 

Writ* for Full Particulars 
G. C. MOYER. Herkimer, Now York 

GARNER-MOORE STOCK CO. 

WANTED — Location for Summer 

Theatre or Park. 14 people; royalty plays. One 
or two bills a week. Percentage or guarantee. 
State full particulars. C B. CAlXlCOTTE. 
Boa. Mar., Hotel Kaakaskla, La Salle, Ullnola. 
P. S.— Always glad to hear from Al stock 
people. 

Up-lo-the-Mlnule" TCflUy IS 8 

Yankee Doodle Dandy" 

Mailed to any address for one dollar. 

Up-to-date Parodies atwaya on hand; also 
Monologues and Sketches. Address HENRY 
BERUNGHOFF, DcpL "G," Columbia Theatre 
BI.Ih . New York. 

PHILADELPHIA 

via New Jersey Central 

EVERY HOUR ON THE HOUR 

From Liberty St., I A M. to II P. M. 

and at Midnight with Singly 

II MINUTES OF THE HOUR 

From W. ZM St. 

YOUR WATCH IS YOUR TIME TABLE 

Consult P. W. HERO Y, E. P., Agent 
14*0 BROADWAY. NEW YORK 

Bal's Dreadnaught 




AT SUBMARINE PRICES 



%2»m 



Metropolitan (First Ilsin— Curley A Welch- 
Sidney A Townley. (last Half)— Foot Old 

Veterans. 



30 Inch J17.es M Inch 

S Inch II.** M Inch 

U inch IM0 140 inch 

42 inch $21.50 

WILLI AM B AL COMPANY 

145 W. 45U> St., N.Y. 4 W. SM St, N.Y. 

NEW CIRCULAR NOW READY 

Malt Orders FUlsd Sam* Day RacaaVad 

X Pmislt JUquirwd 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



May 16, 1917 



JIMMIE DOLLY 

SHEA, and McCUE 

Exclusive Material 



HERBERT 



LEW 



PIANO AND SONG COMEDY 

BOOKED SOLID 



Five Borsinis 

Novel Comedy Revolving Globe Spectacle 
BIG TIME ACT IN VAUDEVILLE 



A BREEZE FROM THE PLAINS 

NEBRASKA BILL & CO. 



WESTERN NOVELTY ACT 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



DIKE 



LEWIS 



THOMAS & CRADDOCK 



Singing, Talking and Comedy 

Of VAUDEVILLE 



JAS. & 



STANFORD 



ROBINSON and McKISSICK 



DIRECTION MAX OBENDORF 



THERESA L. MARTIN 



In Vaudeville 

N. V. A. 



AGENTS, LOOK US OVER 

TIIVIIVIOIMS and EDDY 

BACK IN TOWN 

Refined Singing, Violin and Piano 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



4 Ft. 8 

of Ragtime 

In Wm. a Friedlaniler's Inc., "The S uff r w tt* Rente. 
Under Person*] Miuimnt BART. H. McHUGH 



JOHNNY 



CORA 

DIRECTION SAM SHANNON 



FRANCES DOUGHERTY 



mtod by 

BOBBY LUCEY At Pi««o 

la A LITTLE BIT OF EVERYTHING Direction THOS. FTTZPATRICK 



BENTELL BROS. 

Acrobatic Dancers 

IN VAUDEVILLE PLAYING U. & O. 



JAS. E. 



ED. F. 



WORLD & PEAT 

SINGING, DANCING AND COMEDY IN VAUDEVILLE 



PHYLLIS EUGENE 

CURWOOD and GORMAN 

Before the Honeymoon and After 

By HERMAN KAHN 

Govt rijfh.te»d 



ROBERTS, STUART and ROBERTS 

FROLICS OF 1916-17 

BOOKED SOLID— LOEW CIRCUIT REP. SAM BAERWITZ 



JACK 



MATT 



CAMPBELL & MEEKER 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



BOB & PEGGY VALENTINE 

"Vital Statistics"— A New Comedy Act in "One 1 * 

IN VAUDEVILLE 

EMILIE SISTERS 2*^. 



Ray Lynch 



A BIG SURPRISE 



Arthur Clay 



FOUR AMERICAN BEAUTIES 

Fred Slater *~** *' wenonah m. tenney ^p^ 



THE^NOVELTY FOUR 

Slim, Elmer, Cy and Heinie send a Hello to their friends. 



DIRECTION MARK LEVY 



PHYLE and PHYLE 



Id Their Latest Comedy Success 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



FRANCIS 



FRANK 



WOOD and WARNOCK 



Novelty Act— In Vaudeville 



ETHEL MAE BARKER 



"KUBELK IN PETTICOATS" 



LINTON and WATSON 

Comedy TsJkta* Act, Entitled 

"Site Auto Know" 

VIRGINIA KELSY 

DOUBLE VOICE PRIMA DONNA 



HERBERT 



TRDUE 



HOEY and SMITH 



COMEDY— SONG— DANCE 



Direction, JACK LEWIS 



KEENE & WILLIAMS 

A Real Comedy Act in One. Special Scenery 

NOW PLAYING 



SAMMY— GOLD & SEAL— EU 

Those Champagne Boys in "BITS OF VARIETY*' 

DIRECTION ROSE A CURTIS 



May 16, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



29 



SIXTEEN MANAGERS FINED 

Memphis, Tenn., May 11. — Each of the 
sixteen managers recently arrested was 
fined $50 by City Judge Bates for keeping 
his theatre open on Sunday. This was 
the second time the managers were brought 
into the Police Court, fined and bound 
over. The grand jury ignored the charges 
filed by the city authorities. 



GARDEN THEATRE CO. CHARTERED 

Charleston, S. C, May 10. — A charter 
has been granted to the Garden Theatre 
Co. for the purpose of conducting the 
house now being constructed. The com- 
pany has not decided definitely the policy, 
but the theatre will probably be devoted 
to motion pictures and vaudeville. 



MOVIES REUNITE FAMILY 
Chicago, May 14. — William McCaus- 
land, a Baton Rouge banker, who was 
recently located by his wife through a 
moving picture, after being missing from 
home for a year, has effected a reconcilia- 
tion, and tbey and their three children are 
now on their way to Spokane. 



NORMAN STEIN INJURED 

Norman Stein, manager of the Lexing- 
ton Avenue Opera House, is slowly recov- 
ering from injuries received in a subway 
accident last Wednesday morning. Al- 
though Stein has resumed his duties at 
the theatre, it is necessary for him to em- 
ploy a cane to get around. 



MABELLE ESTELLE RECOVERED 

Mabelle Estclle has entirely recovered 
from her recent operation, subsequent to 
the illness, which suddenly terminated her 
tour in "The Girl He Couldn't Boy." 



STAINBACK BACK IN MEMPHIS 

Memphis, Tenn,, May 12. — Ben]. M. 
Stainback, who has been in Birmingham 
for the past six weeks, arranging for the 
opening of the Loew house there, has re- 
turned to the city. 



MANAGER IN TRAINING CAMP 

Charleston, S. C, May 10.— Fred 
Martin, who managed the Victoria The- 
atre here during the season just closed, 
left to-day for the training camp at Fort 
Ogilthorpe, Tenn. 



VIVIANI VISITS BERNHARDT 

Mme. Sarah Bernhardt received a visit 
last week at the Mount Sinai Hospital. 
where she has been ill for several week*, 
from M. Viviani, of the French commis- 
sion, now in this country. 



PAUL DURAND 



ANNOUNCES 



WILLIE 



FRANK 



FIELDS ! TAYLOR 



IN A NEW 
OFFERING OF 

VERSATILE 
VAUDEVILLE 



WENONAH M. TENNEY 



HLL1MD 



-:: IN A NEW ::~ 
SINGLE OFFERING 



ENTITLED 



"The Upright Jester" 




POOTLIGHT FAVORITES - 



'"jg^HyffiSS^,' 



America's Representative 
Dancers 

ADELAIDE 

and 

HUGHES 



WALTER 

DE LEON 

and 
MARY 

DAVIES 

"Behind The Front" 

D1R. MAX HART 



NAN 
HALPERIN 



Management 
E. F. Albet 



GEORGE M. 
ROSENER 

The Representative 

Character Actor 

of American 

Vaudeville 



CHARLIE 
HOWARD 



Management 
Max Hart 



ELIZABETH 

M. 

MUJRRAY 



Dir. AlJ. T. Wilton 



SOPHIE 
TUCKER 

and her 5 Kings of 

Syncopation 



M'z't Max Hart 



SYLVESTER 

AND 

VANCE 

in a skit by Wilhrd Mack 
DIR. PETE MACK 



ROBERT 

DO RE 

The Eminent Barytone 
Direction Paul Durand 



MYRTLE 

YOUNG 

and 
JACK 

WALDRON 

Dir. ED. S. KELLER 



EDYTHE 
& EDDIE 
ADAIR 

in 

"At the Shoe Shop' 

Miuiagtment 
STOKER * BIERBAUER. 



WILLIAM 

H ALLEN 



ETHEL 



HUNTER 

Direction— Pete Mack 



30 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



May 16, 1917 





DEATH KNELL OF SURPLUS 

EX CHANGES IS SOUNDED 

Captain Chas. E. Kimball Predicts a Revolution in die Film Ex- 
change Plan While Lee Ochs Claims That if Exchanges Were 
Unified, It Would Mean a $10,000,000 Saving Annually 



Through the speech of Lee A. Ochs at 
the testimonial dinner given for him at 
Healy 's Log Cabin, last Thursday, on his 
return from a trip across the country, the 
report printed in The Cupper, four weeks 
ago, of a plan to wipe out hundreds of 
unnecessary exchanges, became definitely 
verified. What Mr. Ochs told the assem- 
bled exhibitors and film men was exactly 
the set of facts previously obtained by 
The Clippee from Captain Charles E. Kim- 
ball, of the Hanover Film Co., and others 

Commenting on the speech by Mr. Ochs, 
Captain Kimball, the other day, declared 
the death knell of surplus exchanges had 
been sounded. 

"It's only a question of a short time 
now when exchange organizations will 
be revolutionized," said Captain Kimball. 
"The industry hag got to come to it." 

The next words from Captain Kimball 
expressed the most definite, constructive 
suggestion thus far obtainable. 

"The only obstacle in the way of unify- 
ing the companies, establishing of one 
string of exchanges in place of a dozen, 
concentration into thirty exchange centres 
instead of 100, is the lack of a leader 
big enough and neutral enough to handle 
the reorganization," he said. "Until now 
every man mentioned as a possible pro- 
moter of the coloBBal change has proved 
unavailable because of alliance with some 
particular branch of the industry to such 
an extent that his selfish interests inter- 
fered - with neutral action. 

; 3ut I believe there is one man able 
to bring order out of chaos and work the 
proper results. He is E. H. Horstman, 
president of the Mew England Exhibitors' 
League. 



Captain Kimball declined to say wheth- 
er actual steps had been taken toward the 
unifying of exchange service, involving 
Mr. Horstman's name, but it seemed this 
was not remotely impossible. 

Evils of the. present exchange system, 
previously recounted in The Clippeb re- 
port, were outlined by Mr. Ochs in his 
speech as follows: 

"In Salt Lake City there are eight the- 
atres and 14 exchanges; in Denver there 
are 19 theatres and 22 exchanges. Just 
think of it! We can all recall the Gen- 
eral Film days when each exchange had 
58 reels a week to release. Nowadays 
some exchanges have as low as five. Even 
the old General Film could not make two 
exchanges pay in Denver and Dallas. How 
much less a profit will the exchange with 
only five reels make? I know of one 
case where the gross receipts were $800 
a week and the expenses $1,400." 

Captain Kimball gives The Clippee fur- 
ther facts. 

"There are now about 600 exchanges 
centered in about 100 cities. All that are 
needed are 30 exchanges in 30 cities, serv- 
ing the whole industry. The violent com- 
petition that naturally rages between the 
present exchanges now pours excess serv- 
ice upon the exhibitor. It causes films 
to be dumped on the market for $5 and 
$10 a day. No producer can make money 
that way. 

"If the exchanges were unified it would 
save the producers from seven and a half 
ten million dollars annually." 

It is probable that if reorganization is 
not effected before, it will be brought 
about at the forthcoming motion picture 
convention at Chicago, July 14 to 22. . 



CIRCUITS GET "WITHIN THE LAW* 

A record in the booking of motion pic- 
tures was broken last week when every big 
Greater New York vaudeville circuit 
booked "Within the Law." Heretofore, 
these big motion picture theatre owners 
have refused to book any picture booked 
by a competing house, arguing that no pic- 
ture could be booked in almost adjacent 
and competing houses and obtain the max- 
imum box office returns for all hou ses. 

The circuits that have booked "Within 
the Law" are those controlled by Marcus 
Loew, S. Poli, William Fox, B. S. Moss, 
F. F. Proctor, Meyer 4 Snyder and B. F. 
Keith. The presentation of "Within the 
Law" on these circuits will start next 
Monday, and the booking contracts can 
for the presentation of the picture for one 
hundred and twenty days, to be played 
within the week after the first showing of 
the picture. 



MAYFAIR FILM PROGRESSING 

The Mayfair Film Company, a new pro- 
ducing organization, will begin recording 
its first production on May 21, in the 
Gene Ganntier studio, on West Fifty-fourth 
Street, New York. 

M. A. Schlesinger, who is well known 
in the European film market as the pres- 
ident of the African Film Trust, die 
African Theatres Trust and the African 
Film Products Company, is president of 
the new company. Peggy Hyland has been 
engaged to star in the first feature, which 
win be ' an adaptation from a story by 
Maravene Thompson. It will be directed 
by George Brabin, and undoubtedly will 
be released on the States rights basis. 



SELECT FIRST PARALTA STORY 

Oscar Apfel. the director, who will su- 
pervise the productions to be made by 
the J. Warren Kerrigan Feature Corpora- 
tion, in which "Handsome Jack" will star, 
has returned to Los Angeles. Mr. Apfel 
was in New York about ten days in con- 
sultation with Carl Anderson, president 
of Paralta Plays, which will release the 
Kerrigan productions. 

Mr. Apfel selected the first story for the 
first Kerrigan picture and opened negotia- 
tions for a second atorv, which is being 
held at a record high price. Mr. Apfel left 
the author thinking over what he con- 
siders a very liberal offer. Robert Brun- 
ton, the art and technical director, who 
will be identified "with the productions of 
the Paralta releases, returned to Cali- 
fornia with Mr. Apfel. 



"AUCTION BLOCK" NEARLY DONE 

"The Auction Block," the second produce 
Hon of the Rex Beach Pictures Company, 
is rapidly nearing completion, and the final 
scenes will be taken in a few days at the 
Weebawken Studio of the company. It is 
expected that the production will be ready 
for exhibitors about September 1. The prin- 
cipal roles are played by Ruby DeRemer, 
Tom Powers, Walter Hitchcock, Florence 
Deshon, Dorothy Wheeler, Florence Johns, 
Xed Burton, Charles Graham, Alec Francis, 
Bernard Randall and Francis Joyner. The 
handling of this feature of the Rex Beach 
Pictures Co. is still in doubt. 



NAME HOUDINI FILM 

The title of the photoplay which the 
Williamson Bros, are producing with 
Hondini as the star will be "The Sub- 
Sea Miracle." The picture win be released 
in the Fall, and is expected to be a great 
drawing card owing to the fame of 
Houdini 



HED WIG LABORATORIES EXPAND 

The rapid growth of the business of the 
Hedwig Laboratories has been so great 
that the company has taken over almost 
the entire fourth floor of the Godfrey build- 
ing. C. C. Field, W. H. Hedwig and 
G. W. Yates, president, vice-president and 
secretary, respectively, are all working 
along with the crews, and keeping the 
plant going day and night. 



WARREN ARRANGES SHOWING 

Edward Warren, producer and director 
of "The Warfare of the Flesh," has ar- 
ranged to give a special trade showing of 
the feature in Chicago this week 



JAMES AFTER MAJOR TITLE 

Liutenant Arthur James, of the Metro, 
is contemplating a trip to Plattsburg, 



PARALTA PLAN 



CPtas) 



(Plus) 



+ 



(Plum) 



(Plus) 



Y°U have been reading about the PARALTA PLAN 
* for several weeks. Now we are going to tell you 
something about the PARALTA PLAYS which are 
to be produced as a part of our original "SQUARE 
DEAL" system of distribution. 

Bat while reading about PARALTA PLAYS, do not 
forget what we have told you about the PARALTA 
PLAN, which will help you make money and save 
money the same day. 

A more effective system of real business thrift has 
never been thought out in connection with moving 

Jiicture exhibition — or any other enterprise. You can 
earn all the details of the PARALTA PLAN by send- 
ing us your name for our mailing list and studying our 
instructive literature on bookings and rentals. 

A MERCHANT cannot sell a kind of goods buyers do 
■** not want. Neither can an exhibitor of motion pic* 
tures. He must have the genuine thing — the Una of 
pictures in class and entertaining value that his patrons 
want to see— "REAL BOX OFFICE ATTRACTIONS." 
All PARALTA PLAYS will bear such trade marks and 
can be readily identified. 

A "REAL BOX OFFICE ATTRACTION" is founded 
on a story of genuine human interest. It must ring 
true in telling on the screen, or it will fail. One can. 
not fool a moving picture audience on this point. They 
quickly detect a crack in the bell — a story that lacks 
in human interest. PARALTA PLAYS will all be great 
stories by acknowledged great writers. 

A "REAL BOX OFFICE ATTRACTION" must also be 
complete in production — in the casting of characters, 
in locality of scenes and in technical and dramatic 
direction. The principal roles must be played by great 
stars of popular standing, wbo meet all requirements 
in talent and personality. All PARALTA PLAYS will 
be complete in every essential of cast and production 
that goes to make up 100 per cent, in box office value. 

THE story will be the thing considered "first, last and 
all the time. We will tell you more about PARALTA 
i PLAYS next week. We know you will be interested in 
I our "CAPACITY PLAN" too. 



PARALTA PLAYS, .« 

CARL ANDERSON, President ROBERT T. KANE, Vice-PresL 

HERMAN FICHTENBERG, Chairman Directors HERMAN KATZ, Treas. 

NAT. I. BROWN, Secretary and Gen'l Manager 

729 SEVENTH AVENUE NEW YORK CITY 




William A. Brady, Director-General. 

WORLD -PICTURES 

present 

ROBERT WARWICK 



GAIL KANE 

The False Friend 



in 
tt 



Story by WILLARD MACK 
Directed by HARRY DAVENPORT 






May 16, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



31 



Chart No. 1 



May 16. 1917 



A REVIEW OF REVIEWS 

FROM TRADE CRITICISMS 

Compiled by THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 

Cut out this chart and paste in scrap book for reference. Use our list of releases as an index. 



1 


Nunc of Film 


CUPPER 


WORLD NEWS 


TELEGRAPH 


TRADE REVIEW 


"THE SIXTEENTH 
WIFE" 

Comedy — Vitagraph. 
Five reels — Released 
May 14th. 

Star: Peggy Hyland 


"A joyous bit of 
frivolity — An entertain- 
ing picture." 


"A photoplay of uncom- 
mon merit. Shows author, 
actors and everyone con- 
cerned in holiday humor." 


"Will entertain im- 
mensely audiences in bet- 
ter class theatres." 


"More effective than a 
frankly played burlesque 
could have been." 


"A breezy comedy full 
of action and interest — 
Will amuse the very best 
of audiences." 

"Just about every- 
thing to make for 
crowded houses and the 
applause of eager pa- 
trons." 


2 


"ROMANCE OF THE 
REDWOODS" 

Western Drama — Art- 
craft. 

Seven reels. Released 
May 14th. 

Star: Mary Ficfcford., 


"It is a Mary Pickford 
picture in all that im- 
plies." 


"Moves along conven- 
tional, but well defined 
lines that give the star 
many effective moments. 
Detail and general direc- 
tion • • * are worthy the 
Artcraft reputation. 


"It would take a good 
many catch lines and pet 
press agent phrases to 
adequately convey the 
quality of Miss Pick- 
ford's performance. 


"The work of a master 
of the art of pictorial 
drama. Interesting even 
when the star is off the 
screen." 


3 


"HER BETTER SELF" 

Society Drama — Fa- 
mous Players. 

Five reels. Released 
May 21st 

Star — Pauline Freder- 
icks. Author, Margaret 
TurnbuU- 


"Has many gripping 
moments. Miss Freder- 
icks is convincing. Direc- 
tion up to standard." 
Telegraph. 


"A strong story » • • 
finely staged. A good pic- 
ture of New York Life." 


"Will please audiences 
generally. The incidents 
of the plot are splendidly 
handled by Director Rob- 
ert Vignola." 


"An interesting char- 
acter study. Full of 
action. Star at her best, 
and ably supported." 


"Theatrically effective. 
Miss Frederick and her 
associates make it accept- 
able to the audience of 
almost any theatre." 


4 


"YANKEE PLUCK" 

Political .... D r a m a — 
World Film. " 

Five reels. Released 
May 21st. 

Star: Ethel Clayton. 

Author: Willard Mack. 


"Several discordant 
ideas in the story, and 
an unsatisfying element 
in the acting. Ethel 
Clayton is at her best." 


"Moves along at a good 
rate of speed. It ranks 
well up in front" 


"Creates an average 
amount of suspense. Not 
equal to others on Mr. 
Brady's program — but 
very fair." 


"Attitude toward an- 
other race hardly appro- 
priate at this time. As 
a screen story, however, 
it is well constructed." 

(Review not available 
to date.) 


"Fulfills all the re- 
quirements of acceptable 
screen drama. But why 
should any producer de- 
liberately represent as a 
conspirator against the 
United States a nation 
which ranks as an ally. 


5 


"WILD WINSHIPS 
WIDOW" 

Comedy Drama — Ince- 
Kay Bee. 

Five Reels. Released 
May 20th. 

Star: Dorothy Dalton. 


"A picture that is well 
worth while — admirably 
directed and well acted." 


"Very tame. There is 
a most ingenuous absence 
of suspense. No strength 
in any of the characters." 


"Clean comedy. Nothing 
sensational, nothing ter- 
ribly exciting. A wel- 
come change from the 
ordinary." 

"Inconsistencies in the 
story and direction that 
are glaring — such a 
cheaply inspired offering 
that to attempt a full list 
of its fanlts would be 
somewhat foolhardy." 


"The moments that ap- 
peal have decided bright- 
ness and those * without 
interest are positively 
dull. la only a fairly 
good show." 


6 


"SOWERS AND 
REAPERS" 

Society Drama — Rolfe- 
Metro. 

Five reels — Released 
May 7th. 

Star — Emmy Wehlen. 


"The introduction of a 
motion picture within a 
motion picture is well 
done and enhances the 
value. Emmy Wehlen 
particularly good. Sup- 
port and direction admir- 
able." 


"Screen fiction in the 
purest sense of the word. 
The best thing in the pic- 
ture is Emmy Wehlen." 


"Presents material of 
uncertain value. Comedy 
possibilities obscured by 
much that is trite and 
improbable." 


(Review not published 
to date.) 




"The Jaguar's Claws," which is sched- 
uled for release by the Jesse L. Lasky 
Feature Play Co. June 14, marks the re- 
turn of Marjorie Daw to the Lasky studio. 

The Criminal Prison Hospital at Dan- 
nemora, N. T., has adopted motion pictures 
as a means of entertainment for its in- 
mates. Paramount pictures are shown ex- 
clusively. 

Bessie Barriscale has returned to Los 
Angeles. She was in New York just 
about one week. 

Oscar Apfel, director of Paralta Plays, 
Inc., and Robt- Brunton, art and technical 
director, have returned to Los Angeles. 

Naomi Childers, star of the TJ. S. Amuse- 
ment-Art Drama, "The Auction of Virtue," 
received word from Mrs. Clyde Childers, 
of Yuka, Cal., no relation, that sbe has 
named one of her recent twins after the 
star. 

Erbograpb Company announces that its 
next picture on Art Drama Program will 
be entitled "Charity Castle." 

Colonel Jasper E wing Brady has left for 
Universal City, Cal., to take charge of the 
Universal scenario department. 



"Who Goes There?" and "Anne's Bridge 
and Between Friends," probably will be 
two of the Robert W. Chambers' novels 
to be screened by Greater Vitagraph under 
its contract with the novelist. 

The Pallas-Moroseo releases announced 
for the month of June include Wallace Reid 
and Myrtle Stedman,- co-star in "The 
World Apart," Vivian Martin in "Giving 
Becky a Chance," George Beban in "A 
Roadside Impresario" and House Peters 
in "The Heir of the Ages." 

Thomas Meigban will play the leading 
role with Billie Burke in her first Famous 
Players-Paramount picture, "The Myste- 
rious Miss Terry," which is now in course 
of production under direction of J. Searle 
Dawley. 

Jack Gardner, who has been a headliner 
in comic opera, has been engaged to take 
the leading role in the three Essanay 
features "Land of Long Shadows," "Range 
Boss" and "Vigilantes," to be released 
through K-E-S-E. 

Captain Collins, of the Jefferson Bar- 
racks, St. Louis, Mo., has arranged to 
show two Paramount pictures each week 
for the boys who are preparing for military 
service. 



ARTCRAF'T 



PRESENTS 



MARY PICKFORD 

PRODUCTIONS 

"A ROMANCE OF THE REDWOODS" 

DIRECTED BY CECIL B. DE MILLE 

"A POOR LITTLE RICH GIRL" 

DIRECTED BY MAURICE TOURNEUR 

"THE PRIDE OF THE CLAN" 

DIRECTED BY MAURICE TOURNEUR 

"LESS THAN THE DUST" 

DIRECTED BY JOHN EMERSON 

Artcraft Pictures Corporation 

729 Seventh Avenue, New York City 

CONTROLLED BY 

Famous Players-Lasky Corporation 

ADOLFH ZUKOR. Pre..; JESSE 1_ LASKY. Vlc«-Praa.; CECIL B. doMILLE, Dlr. Can. 



"The Lad and the Lion," a Selig Red 
Seal Play, released in K-E-S-E service, 
will also appear in the All-Story Magazine 
for June. 



Sam de Grasse is the latest acquisition 
to the Douglas Fairbanks Co. now produc- 
ing its second Artcraft release, "A Regular 
Guy." 



32 



NEWS 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



May 16, 1917 



REVIEWS 

STATE RIGHTS 
INJURED BY 
HIGH JUICES 

WARREN RAPS "BOOSTERS" 



STATE RIGHTS 



RE LEAS ES 
FORUM 



Super pictures, exploited with a barrel 
of money in New York runs, are nails in 
the coffin of state rights, according to 
Edward Warren, of the Edward Warren 
productions. 

Mr. Warren's remarks formed a warn- 
ing to state rights buyers against paying 
fabulous prices for big films. He men- 
tioned several instances of super features 
released recently that "stung" buyers 
across the country and put permanent 
scars upon the whole motion picture in- 
dustry. 

"State rights buyers should beware of 
the film that is staged for a long show- 
ing in New York and then offered with 
high-powered advertising and salesman, 
ship for quadruple the ordinary price to 
territorial distributors," he said. "A man 
recently paid over $75,000 for the New 
York rights to a picture introduced on 
those lines, and it seems very likely now 
that he will not get back the money he 
paid. The buyer of such a picture at 
such a price, is beguiled into the belief 
he can get his picture across by fixing 
big show prices for the box offices where 
it is shown. 

"This is a mistake. The buyer should 
be cautious about depending on SO cent 
or $1 admissions to pay him for an ex- 
travagant investment. 

"If producers persist in forcing super 
productions at super prices on the market, 
they are going to kill the state rights 
game. If buyers are not warned against 
the hazard this practice puts on them, 
very likely certain producers will con- 
tinue it, and a graveyard full of dead 
hopes and ruined fortunes will mark the 
finish of such operations." 

Mr. Warren declared, however, that very 
likely the buyers would "tumble" to the 
danger of big ventures, and that extrava- 
gant state rights prices probably would 
be chloroformed. He expressed the con- 
viction that the best feature pictures 
could be made within reasonable cost 
limits, and sold to buyers for reasonable 
prices, insuring generous profits to both 
producer and buyer. 

H. Z. Levine, sales manager for Mr. 
Warren, supplemented the tatter's asser- 
tions with the statement that the state 
rights game was still a vast, undeveloped 
field. 

"The surface of this business has hard- 
ly been scratched," he said. "There is 
room for countless new buyers in the 
game and there's big money for all, if 
they will buy conservatively." 



O'HARA FILM SHOWN 

The Arizone Film Corp., of the Tower 
building. Chicago, is enjoying big success 
with the initial run of "Should She 
Obey?" at the La Salle Theatre, Chi- 
cago. Barrett O'Hara, head of the film 
company, was formerly Lieutenant Gov- 
ernor of Illinois. He undertook film pro- 
duction to convey sociological messages to 
the country. The films are being released 
to state rights buyers. 



BUYS HANOVER FILM 

The Pioneer Feature Film Corp. has 
purchased, through Nathan Hirsch, its 
president, the Greater New York and New 
York State rights to "How Uncle Sam 
Prepares" from the Hanover Film Co. Mr. 
Hirsch intends to market many prints of 
the film on an elaborate scale. The film 
is notable in that none of its scenes are 
lifted from any other war film. 



UNIVERSAL BEATS BELL 

Filmdom received a considerable sur- 
prise Sunday night when "The Hand That 
Rocks the' Cradle," a frank discussion of 
birth control, picturized by the Universal 
Film Co., was permitted to appear at the 
Broadway Theatre. License Commissioner 
Bell issued a ban against the picture Sat- 
urday, but the Universal lawyers were 
able to procure a quick injunction against 
enactment of the order. 

Mr. Bell ia reported to have withdrawn 
bis objection after seeing the picture at 
its opening. The success of this film in 
"getting by" is in marked contrast to the 
complete suppression of "Birth Control," 
a film featuring Margaret Sanger, pro- 
duced by the B. S. Moss Co. The films 
are similar in tone. "The Hand that 
Rocks the Cradle" will be reviewed next 
week. 



"TRIP THRU CHINA" SHOWN 

Supreme Feature Films, Inc., brought a 
treat to New York last week in the guise 
of "A Trip Thru China," a ten-reel motion 
picture presenting everything of interest 
in the Flowery Kingdom. The picture was 
shown to an invited audience last Sunday. 
It will have a regular run, beginning 
next Sunday, at the Eltinge Theatre, 
under the anspices of the Committee of 
Chinamen. 



MR. AND MRS. LEWIS TAKE REST 

Mr. and Mrs. Edgar Lewis have gone 
to Atlantic City to rest after the strain 
of producing "The Bar Sinister," the nine- 
reel feature which recently made such a 
notable impression in its initial snowing. 

Mr. Lewis is seriously debating whether 
he will begin work this summer on the 
multiple reel picture "The Golden 
Woman." 



NEW THANHOUSER SPECIAL 

Edwin Thanbouser announces the com- 
pletion of a new seven-reel special produc- 
tion. The picture is entitled "The 
Heiress." It required three months to 
make it. The cast includes Florence La 
Badie, J. H. Gilmonr. Gertrude Dallas. 
Wayne Arey, Richard R. Neil, Arthur 
Bower and Claude Cooper. 



FILM SHOWS UP BROADWAY 

Advance notices describe "The Devil's 
Playground," which is to be released by 
Fraternity Films through Abrams & 
Werner, as a remarkable expose of the 
dangers of Broadway. It treats of the 
demoralization the dance halls work upon 
young people. 



MISS LESLIE HELPS UNCLE SAM 

The Thanhonser Co. believes its forthcom- 
ing picture, "An Amateur Orphan," featur- 
ing Gladys Leslie, is going to aid Uncle 
Sam's "back to the farm" movement. The 
film is taken on the prettiest farm dis- 
coverable in New York State, and is illum- 
inated by some of Miss Leslie's prettiest 
smiles. 



"BAR SINISTER" OPENS SOON 

"The Bar Sinister," the big Edgar Lewis 
production, win be screened at the Broad- 
way Theatre, beginning May 27, for an 
indefinite run. Frank G. Hall, who con- 
trols the world rights, is conducting a big 
distribution campaign for the picture. 

MISS WILCOX PLEASED 

Ella Wheeler Wilcox has issued n state- 
ment expressing her intense delight «-ver 
the arrangement by which Warner Broth- 
ers have undertaken to film all her poems. 
The producers declare these poems lend 
themselves to remarkable film dramas. 



IVAN FILM HAS RUN 

The Ivan Fflm Co. super production. 
"One Law for Both." began this wrek a" 
highly successful run at the Lyric The- 
atn» 



NEW BOOSTERS 

HELP SHOWMEN 

TRY_F1LMS 

CHANCE IN STATE RIGHTS 



With the assertion in various terms that 
the state rights market is not yet half 
explored, that its surface is hardly 
scratched and that the market is in a 
splendid condition, several more pro- 
ducers joined, during the last few days, 
the fraternity of boosters who invite 
showmen outside the game to investigate 
the territorial rights division of the in- 
dustry. 

M. H. Hoffman, president of M. H. Hoff- 
man, Inc., 729 Seventh avenue, which is 
releasing 'The Sin Woman" and "Who 
Knows?" brought to New York a glowing 
story of the opportunities apparent 
throughout the country in his recent trip 
to and from the coast. 

"The state rights field is a tremendous 
one," said Mr. Hoffman. "The condition 
of the market could hardly be better. 
There is plenty of room in it for all the 
live, well trained and enterprising show- 
men who care to enter." 

Mr. Hoffman is preparing an analytical 
report of the state rights field in all its 
phases as a result of the investigation he 
made during his trip. 

B. P. Flneman, sales manager of the 
Ivan Films Corp., of 126 West Forty- 
sixth street, releasing "One Law for Both," 
also offered strong indorsement df the 
idea that legitimate showmen could find 
bright opportunities in the state rights 
field. 

"Up to five or six years ago the legiti- 
mate showmen were looking down with 
contempt on the film industry," said Mr. 
Flneman. "Since then, innumerable men 
from the legitimate theatrical field have 
deserted the latter to embark in films and 
have made many times more money than 
they ever did before. 

"A showman is naturally fitted to 
handle the marketing of films, by reason 
of his knowledge of how to conduct an 
amusement enterprise. He would find 
himself altogether at home in purchasing 
the marketing rights for a picture in his 
territory. He would know, for instance, 
what kind of films would go well in his 
territory, because he knows what kind 
of legitimate shows are acceptable there. 
"The showman knows by experience 
whether a "heavy vamp' production is 
what his clientele want, or whether they 
want light, frivolous material. The thea- 
tre-going public in each territory will 
manifest the same taste in motion picture 
matters as it does in legitimate theatrical 
affairs." 

Harry A. Sherman, of Sherman-Elliott, 
in a prepared statement to the motion 
picture press, expressed very much the 
same opinion. 

"The state rights system is here to 
stay," said Mr. Sherman. "Open booking 
is the sign post pointing to the ultimate 
goal. If the open market system should 
become the universal method, all short 
subjects will be marketed independently. 
T think that the two or three-reel drama 
is a dead_ issue, for a long time to come." 



BUYS "SUBMARINE EYE" 

Herman J. Garfield has bought the 
r ight s to "The Submarine Eye" from the 
Williamson Brothers for the states pf 
Ohio, Indiana and Kentucky. He intends 
to send five companies out with the film. 



GETS "THE CRISIS" FOR ILLINOIS 

Jones, Linick & Sehsefer have bought 
the Illinois rights to "The Crisis" from 
Sherman-Elliot. 



WIDE RANGE SEEN 
IN FEATURE FILMS 
FOR STATE RIGHTERS 

The names and addresses of feature film 
producers and titles of their current and 
pending releases that are especially suit- 
able for state rights exploitation, are : 

Corona Cinema Co., Los Angeles, Cal. — 
"The Curse of Eve." 

Arrow Film Corp., Times Building, New 
York (Sty— "The Deemster." 

De Luxe Spoilers Co., 729 Seventh Ave- 
nue, "The (De Luxe) Spoilers." 

Today Feature Film Corp, 1584 Broad- 
way, New York City— "Today." 

Sol L. Lesser, Longacre Building, New 
York City— "The Ne'er-Do-WeB." 

Benjamin Chapin Studios, Ridgefield 
Park, N. J.— "The Lincoln Cycle." 

Eugenic Film Co, 220 West Forty- 
second Street, New York City— "Birth." 

Williamson Bros., Longacre Building, 
New York. City— "The Submarine Eye." 

Frohman Amusement Corp, Times 
Building, New York City— "God's Man." 

E. I. S. Motion Picture Corp, 203 West 
Fortieth Street, New York City— "Trooper 

Gold Medal Pbotoplayers, 729 Seventh 
Avenue, New York City— "The Web of 
Life." 

Ones Film Co, 130 West Forty-fifth 
Street, New York City— "The Fated 
Hour." 

Flora Finch Comedy Films Corp, 729 
Seventh Avenue, New York City — "War 
Prides." 

Balboa Amusement Producing Co, 1600 
Broadway, New York City— "The Twisted 
Thread." 

Ultra Picture Corp, 729 Seventh Ave- 
nue, New York City— "The Woman Who 
Dared." 

Frank G. Hall Productions, Inc, Long- 
acre Building, New York City— "The Bar 
Sinister." 

Variety Films, 126 West Forty-sixth 
Street, New York City— "The Price of 
Her SouL" 

Ivan Film Productions, 130 West Forty- 
sixth Street, New York City— "One Law 
for Both." 

Intei-ocean Film Corp, 220 West Fortv- 
second Street, New York City— "The 
Manxman." 

Edward Warren Productions, 1482 
Broadway, New York City— "The Warfare 
of the Flesh." 

Cinema War News Syndicate, Longacre 
Building, New York City — "American War 
News Serial." 

Sheriott Picture Corp, 218 West Fortv- 
second Street, New York City— "The 
Black Stork." 

Hanover Film Co, Columbia Theatre 
Building, New York City— "How Uncle 
Sam Prepares." 

Graphic Features, 220 West Forty-sec- 
ond Street, New York Citv— "The Woman 
and the Beast," 

Grand Feature Film Company, 220 West 
Forty-second Street, New York City— 
"Rex Beach Himself." 

Enlightenment Photoplays Corp, 220 
West Forty-second Street, New York City 
—"Enlighten Thy Daughter." 

Universal Film Co, 1600 Broadway, New 
York City— "God's Law," and "20,000 
Leagues Under the Sea." 

Max Cohen Co, 729 Seventh Avenue, 
New York City— "The Fury of Civiliza- 
tion," "America Is Ready." 

HiUer & WiUr, Inc, ' Longacre Build- 
ing, New York City— "The Battle of 
Gettysburg," "The Wrath of the Gods." 

M. H. Hoffman Co, 729 Seventh Ave- 
nue, New York City— "The Sin Woman," 
"Who Knows?" and "The Seven Cardinal 
Virtues." 

A. Kay Co, 729 Seventh Avenue, New 
York City— "Terry Feature Burlesque," 
"Terry Human Interest Reel," "Golden 
Spoon Mary." 

Popular Pictures Corp, 218 West Forty- 
second Street, New York City— "A Woman 
Wills," "The Princess of India" "The 
Burglar and" the Lady," "The Little Or- 
phan" and "Ignorance." 



May 16, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



33 



HALL BUYS ANOTHER FEATURE 

Frank G. Hall, who Tecently bought the 
world rights to Edgar Lewis' "The Bar 
Sinister," has acquired the world rights to 
"Her Fighting Chance," a seven-reel drama 
depicting life in the Canadian Northwest 
and starring Jane Grey. Thomas Holding, 
who has appeared in many Paramount pro- 
ductions, Has the principal male role. 

HALL TO SHOW FILM 
The Frank Hall Productions, Inc., will 
give a trade showing at the Broadway 
Theatre at 10 -o'clock this morning, of "Her 
Fighting Chance," featuring Jane Grey. 
This is the latest production of the A. K. 
Jacobs Photoplays, Inc. It is a picturi- 
zation of "The Fiddling Man," by James 
Oliver Cnrwood. 



BRADY DIRECTS GORDON PICTURE 

Kitty Gordon's next picture play, "The 
Beloved Adventuress," now nearly finished, 
will not be released until mid- July. It con- 
tains, among other stirring features, some 
battle scenes which are said to be ex- 
tremely realistic. These, with most of the 
others, were produced by Director General 
William A. Brady in person, whose 
handling of crowds upon the speaking stage 
made him internationally famous long ago. 



GRIFFITH HAS WAR FILMS 



SUBSEA FILM TO RUN IN NEW YORK 

Williamson Brothers announce that 
"The Submarine Eye," their third subsea 
drama, will be screened at the Liberty 
Theatre in New York within the next two 
weeks, for an indefinite run. 



KITTY GORDON BURNED 

Kitty Gordon and Pinna Nesbit, were 
both burned as the result of a premature 
explosion of a bomb during the taking of a 
scene in a picture at the World Film 
Studios in Fort Lee, N. J., last week. Miss 
Gordon. was burned about the eyelids and 
Miss Nesbit about the arms and body. 
Both are expected to return to work this 
week. 



D. W. Griffith, who left the United 
States for England several months ago 
to secure motion picture records on the 
western battle front, in France, by courtesy 
of the English War Office, has concluded his 
work in this connection and is expected 
back in this country in the immediate 
future. Upon his return, he will commence 
activities on s new production ■ which he 
will later release through the Artcraft 
Pictures Corporation. 



TRIANGLE GETS H. O. DAVIS 

H. O. Davis has severed his connection 
with the Universal company, and signed 
with the Triangle Film Corporation to fill 
on executive position closely associated 
with Thomas Ince. O. L. Sellers, man- 
ager of production at Universal City, Col., 
has resigned, and is to be associated with 
Mr. Davis. 



EWAN JUSTICE SICK 

Ewsn Justice, head of the Fox Film Cor- 
poration publicity forces, is confined to his 
home as the result of a nervous breakdown. 
A. L. Selig is acting in his stead during 
his absence. 



WANTS TO TAX FILM FOOTAGE 

Habbisbtjkg, Pa., May 14. — In an effort 
to find means of makin